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Measurement Explanations


Northern Star

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So I use the US Standard System. This is different from the Imperial and Metric System.

Common explanations for measurements.

A bushel, to make it easy here, is 60 pounds. Yes it does vary from crop to crop. It is a measurement of volume + weight.

lbs is pounds. # can mean lbs or 100 pounds. CWT is a "hundred weight".

A ton is 2000lbs

' means foot/feet. " is inches.

To make this easy, an Acre is about the size of a North American Football Field, and there is about 2 acres in a Soccer/Football field.

Everything in the US and Canada is in acres, while Canada does use metric now, everything there was originally surveyed the same way the US was.

Everything here(and Canada) is divided up into sections and townships. 36 sections a township, 640 acres per township. Sections can be divided up into 160 acre quartes or whatever is required. A section is a square, with its side being a mile long each.

-40 is the same, 32F is 0C.

I believe that covers everything I will use. I'm sure most already know, but for those who don't, here you go.

Edited by TheGleaner

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Can you clarify

# can mean lbs or 100 pounds. CWT is a "hundred weight".

Are you saying 5 # can mean 5 pounds or 500 pounds? And what is a hundred weight?

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13 hours ago, Metal Brony 42 said:

Can you clarify

# can mean lbs or 100 pounds. CWT is a "hundred weight".

Are you saying 5 # can mean 5 pounds or 500 pounds? And what is a hundred weight?

Yes...in North America, before social media and such, it was called the pound sign. It's official use is to mean pounds, as in 5# is 5 pounds. Its slang/shorthand use is the "5# means 500 pounds" and that is somewhat regional/industry/use specific, as in "feed the 7# calves 5# of corn and 15# of hay per head per day" where there 700 pound calves makes sense, but 500 pounds of corn does not, neither does 1500 pounds of hay. I will try to avoid using it here for that reason, but when you use it every day, it will slip by. Wikipedia has a decent write up on its origins and history under "number sign".

A CWT, or hundred weight is 100 pounds. The Roman Numeral C is 100 and WT is WeighT. In my experience it is used in things like selling cattle, as (most of the time) you do not bid per pound or per head, but you bid per hundred weight, per 100 pounds. So if you were bidding on a 850 pound calf and you bid $125, 850(weight of the calf) /100(hundred weight)=8.5*125(the bid) =$1062.50 per head, but most of the time you are bidding on a pen full, so they take an average weight(they do sort them to be in like sizes before hand).

I believe its use comes from the past when beam and similar scales were more widely used and you had to add weights instead of sliding them when measuring heavy things, ex "adding another hundred weight to the scale".

I hope this helps and clears it up.

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The thing that drives me crazy is 1 # can mean 1 pound sometimes and 100 pounds other times, in the same sentence. Metric system is far better in every way.

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18 hours ago, Metal Brony 42 said:

The thing that drives me crazy is 1 # can mean 1 pound sometimes and 100 pounds other times, in the same sentence. Metric system is far better in every way.

Like I said, the "1#=100" is very industry and region specific.

Metric has its problems too.

In my experience, it seems that people will just use "K". 

"You have to go 50k then turn but don't go over 40k and 30k , they'll pull you over and give you a ticket for speeding and being over weight." That there is just as bad, perhaps worse, and that was on a recent trip to Canada.

I really do not want this to turn into a "Metric vs US vs Imperial" but I will say from a mechanic, land, and bulk product stand point, US is much better. Less wrenches and bolts plus the bolt head always equals the same size bolt, acres and the US system for applying product works so nice, and measuring things by weight sucks. For example we order 8 & 3/4 tons of fertilizer. Sometimes it will fit in one truck. Others we have to scramble and find another to put the rest in. Bushels is a measurement of volume with weight. If we could order 250 bushels of fertilizer, that would work alot better.

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6 hours ago, TheGleaner said:

You have to go 50k then turn but don't go over 40k and 30k , they'll pull you over and give you a ticket for speeding and being over weight

That is only bad because it is incorrect and meaningless. That is not the fault of the system. I assume it means 50 km, and 40 km/h, and 30 k tonne? I worked in Canada and I know the metric system quite well.

 

6 hours ago, TheGleaner said:

I really do not want this to turn into a "Metric vs US vs Imperial"

Darn! :ButtercupLaugh:

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18 hours ago, Metal Brony 42 said:

That is only bad because it is incorrect and meaningless. That is not the fault of the system. I assume it means 50 km, and 40 km/h, and 30 k tonne? I worked in Canada and I know the metric system quite well.

 

Darn! :ButtercupLaugh:

Switch the 40 and 30 and you got what I was aiming for with the example as what we were told was:

50km, 40,000LBS, 30KM/h.

Welcome to Western Canada where it's too hard to decide so you combine them. That's been my experience with metric...which is great :D...some odd laws and ways for sure but oh well I'll live, kinda have to with us looking at farming both sides of the border in a few years.

If you mean the k is not the fault of the system...then neither is the #=100...if I'm reading that correctly...as the #=100 is the same thing...

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