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Found 990 results

  1. Depending on the Outcome (Box Office Wise), I could see a 2nd Theatrical Film coming out of this. However, if we were to be real here, I say the most realistic logical choice would be Direct to Video to release a sequel on. Now as far as a story goes, I could see a story were we "finally" could have a crossover between The Friendship is Magic Mane 6/7 and The Equestria Girls Mane 6/7, and find out the true connection between both worlds. I could also see a story were we get a "Passing of the Torch" , were the Mane 6 would have to seek out those that they believe Can carry on the Elements of Harmony from them, along with the Rainbow Power. I could also see a story were it Centers around the "Guardians of Harmony" line. And Finally, I could see a story were we get the "Return of Tirek", who by using some kind of magic along with the Generation's take on the Witches from the G1 film, helps resurrect The Storm King. And The Mane 6/7 have to come together with some new power bestowed upon them/or they have to unlock to try and stop this group of villains from destroying Equestria. But those are just my thoughts on how I feel a sequel could be released and my thoughts/ideas on what kind of story we could get out of it. But what about you, how do you think it could be released, and what kind of story do you think we could get as a result. And do you anyone agree my thoughts on the whole thing? Let me know down below. Thanks and God Bless -bwrosas
  2. This was just a quick Fanfiction that I did involving the so-called Waifu thief Flash Sentry, along with Twilight, Rarity and Discord. Why is Rarity twiterpated over Flash Sentry? https://www.fimfiction.net/story/400739/flash-sentrys-heart-and-hooves-nightmare
  3. This is a Source Filmmaker video that I did involving Flash Sentry as the Heart and Hooves Waifu Thief. Little does he realize, someone wants to make him his Husbando
  4. Yes, from what I was able to count off, for a season that's main selling point and focus is the School Of Friendship, there's only 10 episodes focusing on it. While the other 16 are more along the lines of what we've seen in pervious seasons when it comes to the Mane 6-7-8. And honestly , I think it works. I mean you still get to focus on the selling point of the season, that being the School, but you still get to (for majority of the season) keep the Main Focus on the Mane 6/7/8 and retain what made the show what it is to begin and what brought it to the dance in the first place. So what are your thoughts on this? God Bless!
  5. After watching "Analyst Bronies React: Season 7 Finale "Shadow Play", I can understand many of the points that they made. However, if you really think about it, Starswirl was just as much to blame for what happen as Twilight. Now you may ask, "How can that be?" Well, when you think about it, if he had placed a note in his journal, telling whoever came across it, not to reverse the spell, maybe the Mane 6 would've been more cautious about it. Now let's say Twilight still wanted to reverse the spell, she could've done it in a way, that like in the S4 premiere , she could've put her own spin on it, and like later on in Part 2 of "Shadow Play", assumes she's figured out a way to bring the Pillars back without the Pony of Shadows, only to have it backfire, for example, when it at first it seems to have work, and even Starswirl seems impressed, but as they start to leave Ponhenge along with the Pillars, that's when the lighting hits and the Pony of Shadows emerges, and as they all turn around and see this, that's when Twilight realizes her own spin on the spell failed. Another thing is, if they wanted to involve Celestria and Luna a bit more, they could've had Starswirl teach them (back in the past) not opening or reverse any kind of spell that's meant to protect Equestria, and then have them pass it on to their future students. One thing some fans have taken issue with, is Starlight being the voice of reason, and basically being the one that saw the bigger picture of the situation and realized that there was possibly more to this than what was being telegraphed. And the reason that was, was because she was using her past experiences as an antagonist and what she had learned as Twilight's Student to realize that they were only getting one side of the story and not the other, and when they finally did get that side of the story, the reaction of the Pillars and StarSwirl was one of, "Oops! We Fu**Yeah** upped! Because they realized that hear their friend out on his reasoning for taking their items, and his reasoning, was because he wanted to help them in battle. And Starlight's reaction towards when this revelation was made, was one of, "See, Stygin was ready to talk and explain his actions" One other thing, is some fans may not like the fact, that it took towards the end of part 2 for her friends to stick up for Twilight, but my guess, is they love and respected Twilight enough, as to not confront Starswirl's berating of her, that was until he didn't even get a look see or consideration to her proposed plan/spell, and guess that was moment that the rest of the Mane 6 were basically "Enough of this berating crap of our friend!" So overall, yes!, "Shadow Play" was/is possibly one of the best Season Finale's the Show has done. But yet there are issue's here and there, that some members of the fanbase will take issue with, either positively or negatively. But those are just my thoughts. What did you guys think of what I had to say? Take Care!
  6. In this sequel to Wrath of an Angry Prince, Spike enlists Rarity and Fluttershy to help remake Twilight's dresses that she wore as a unicorn to help remind her of the most important events in her life as part of an effort to help Twilight get over the loss of her library. Meanwhile, Discord also joins in, determined to get on Shining Armor's good side by remaking Twilight's best mare dress. *Special thanks to Pastelights for editing. https://www.fimfiction.net/story/266451/dresses-for-a-princess
  7. I'm sure most of you are aware of the leaks from a month or two back, but I just found out today. One of the supposed leaks is concept art for the gen 5 mane 6. While it's not set in stone being years in the future and is obviously subject to change or may not even be legitimate it looks pretty official. What do you all think about it? They turned my Twilight into a Earth Pony! 😠 mlp
  8. Good evening, everypony, and welcome back to another edition of "Batbrony Reviews"! Well, I have some catching up to do on a few very important reviews, and what better place to start than with the momentous "My Little Pony: The Movie" (2017). The first feature length film featuring the canon ponies of Generation 4 (not counting the previous first Equestria Girls film that had a limited theatrical run, though it is worth pointing out that those were not considered canon when first released, but rather only just confirmed as being in continuity as of the Season 7 finale), "My Little Pony: The Movie" is a testament to the remarkable run that G4 MLP:FiM has had as well as the sheer size of the fandom it has generated. It is undoubtedly by this point one of the most popular and profitable media franchises owned by Hasbro, and even though Transformers may be more profitable still (though their box office returns have been dwindling quite a bit as of late), MLP is undoubtedly one of the most, if not the most, critically acclaimed television or film media currently being produced by Hasbro. Thus, a film was inevitable, and many were actually surprised it took this long to put one out into theaters, but it finally happened, and thus, just before the conclusion of MLP:FiM's seventh season, well over 150 episodes into the show, we finally got a theatrical feature for MLP:FiM. Was the wait worth it? Well, let's find out, without further ado, this is "Batbrony Reviews: My Little Pony: The Movie." WARNING: This should go without saying, but there are indeed LOTS of spoilers below. If you haven't seen the movie yet, this is your last chance to turn back now if you don't want it spoiled. A short disclaimer before I begin. Unlike many of my reviews, which either focus on specific characters involved or dissect every intricate detail of an episode, this will be a far more general review, even compared to my season finale/season in review blogs. My reasoning? Simple: this movie is 99 minutes long, packed with more actual content than even any episodes ever have been (including two-parters), though that is not to say it necessarily has more depth than any MLP episode ever has. But the film, I believe, must be analyzed as its own property within the MLP:FiM universe, not necessarily how it relates that much to the continuity of the show itself since it's not required to watch the show to understand what's going on (at least, not entirely). It is a part of the show, it is a part of the show's universe, but it is still it's own story, and while there is some chance we may yet see characters or species even introduced in the movie end up in the show, the movie in the long run will only have so much of an impact on the show itself. Therefore, I'll break this review down into five simple categories: Story, Characters, Music, Animation, Themes. That should give a solid enough overview of every important aspect of the film without becoming overly long or tedious. With that out of the way, let's begin. Story The story follows a familiar pattern for longtime fans of the show (at least in its general structure), but in its set up serves as a solid format for introducing newcomers to the show, in a sense. The Mane 6 and everypony else in Equestria are putting on a Festival of Friendship at Canterlot, and Twilight, of course, is nervous as hell about making sure everything goes right. After her friends reassure her that everyone will come together and do their part, Tempest Shadow, the right hand mare of the Storm King, arrives with a large part of his fleet of airships and attacks Canterlot! Three of the princesses are magically imprisoned, Twilight escapes with her friends, and they go on a number of adventures to enlist the aid of the Hippogriffs, who turn out to be hiding away under their traditional homeland beneath the sea as Sea Ponies. While their plans do not go as hoped, they still manage to make some new friends and allies, and in the end, take down the Storm King, reform Tempest Shadow and many of his defeated forces (namely Grubber), and free the princesses, Canterlot, and the rest of Equestria from his tyrannical grip (not to mention everyone else he'd been terrorizing for some time). Lessons were learned, friendships were made or reaffirmed, and fun and adventure was had by all. The End. Let's get this out of the way right now. This is not the best story that MLP has ever had, and if you're expecting that, you're going to be disappointed. Long time fans, in my opinion, should not go into it expecting this or even wanting this. The nature of a film based on such a long running series as MLP:FiM is not to be the pinnacle of the series itself. That is a disservice to both the fans of the show and moviegoers who have never seen one minute of the show before. Instead, a movie based off of a cartoon show that has been running this long (though I suppose it should apply to any show that has been running this long, even if others may have to deal with fitting into their show's continuity more depending on the nature of the show itself) is to give an accurate representation of what the show itself is all about. What are the core themes, who are the main characters and what are they like, and what is the general nature of the show as a whole and how it is executed. An older example of this (which, appropriately enough, our beloved Lauren Faust was closely involved with, having written the screenplay) is "The Powerpuff Girls Movie" from 2002, directed by Faust's husband, Craig McCracken. McCracken, Faust, and their team set out to accomplish the same exact thing that MLP:FiM: The Movie does, give audiences a general idea of who the Powerpuff Girls are, what they do, and why the show as a whole is worth watching, and they did it splendidly. This movie does the same about as well as the former did, in two important respects: it is a general enough affair that most general audiences could at least find something positive out of it without complaining about not knowing the show's continuity, but at the same time it does not compromise itself inordinately for the sake of newcomers, to the detriment of long time fans of the show. This is unashamedly an MLP:FiM movie, and it embraces every element that the fans of the show love, and that the creators of the show KNOW the fans love. It simply presents all of these elements in film format, not for television, so the pacing is slowed down, there are some longer conversations, and at times a tad bit of redundancy since, let's be honest, this crew is not used to creating something this long, but never in a bad way. The beats and general progression of the film are fairly predictable, but again, this is not bothersome if you accept the movie for what it is, something that is more interested in executing itself with its own unique identity as opposed to its structure being original or unique. The core themes of the show, at the end of the day, remain at the film's core, tying everything together: the power of friendship, adventure, humor, perseverance in the face of insurmountable odds, fun, exciting, and exotic settings, both old and new, and the capacity for new friendships to either emerge from hardship, struggle, and even hatred and conflict, and for old friendships to survive true adversity and trials. These were all there, and since they were, even if it was hardly the most nuanced or complex story ever presented by MLP:FiM in any format, I was still completely satisfied by the experience for what it was, especially because it was so confident in what it was and sure of itself. Overall, this was exactly the story this movie needed to deliver. Characters Unlike the aforementioned Powerpuff Girls Movie, "My Little Pony: The Movie" actually opted to add a bevvy of new characters, many of whom we probably won't see in the show again (though I know there's more than a few I wouldn't mind seeing again). This was probably mostly to help fill more of the film's running time, and that's fine, because they never felt like that's all they were doing. Every new character served a purpose and was very enjoyable to watch in their own way for unique reasons. Capper was a delightful, suave con artist who went through a nice redemption arc, Captain Celaeno and the Sky Pirates were a lot of fun to watch and not nearly as awkward as they appeared they could have been in some of the trailers, fitting into the overall flow of the movie just fine, Queen Novo was fun when she showed up but sadly didn't feature more (and was also pretty believable as another one of this world's rulers along with Equestria's princesses given how ardent she was in looking out for her people), I cannot rave ENOUGH about Kristin Chenoweth's Princess Skystar, who was every bit as adorable as I thought she would be (not to mention the added bonus of getting some Chenoweth vocals in MLP: The Movie did not hurt one bit), Songbird Serenade, by far the least developed of the new characters, still served her purpose well enough with some smashing great vocals from her VA, Sia, Grubber was surprisingly quite funny and even though he was clearly there just to be a comedic foil, it never got irritating to me, and the Storm King, while not nearly as threatening in demeanor as Tirek, Discord (when he was still a villain), Queen Chrysalis, or even Nightmare Moon, was the perfect villain for this movie, and hats off to Liev Schreiber for genuinely having fun with his performance. The standout of the new characters was, of course, Emily Blunt's outstanding Tempest Shadow (a.k.a. Fizzlepop Berrytwist), who serves as the primary villain for most of the film before the Storm King shows up near the end and she completes her character arc of getting reformed. This character is undoubtedly where the movie's writing is at its strongest. Unfortunately some might draw lazy parallels between her and Starlight, but the fact of the matter is that, even though their backstories and redemption arcs have some broad similarities, the specifics are far more different and nuanced. Starlight didn't believe in cutie marks to begin with, but never expressed a desire to be a loner until her revenge plot against Twilight (even then, her working by herself was more circumstantial than anything else). She wanted to be a part of something special, hence why she started her "utopian" community in the first place; she wanted a place to belong to that she felt functioned as an ideal home and society should. Tempest, on the other hand, by the start of the film has completely turned her back on ponies in general, not just an aspect of pony biology or what it means for pony society. She's far more anger-driven than Starlight ever was, and her purpose is singular: she wants to feel like a real unicorn again. She's extremely self-conscious, even troubled, by the injuries she sustained as a foal at the claws of an Ursa Minor that disfigured her and, most notably, cleaved off most of her horn, and she is willing to do anything, even doom all the other ponies of Equestria - since in her mind, none of them were able to help her anyway all these years, so why should she care about them now when they never cared for her - to get it restored and feel whole again. It's quite a tragic backstory, a little more on the nose than Starlight's, but still relatable, especially for anyone who has disabilities or disfigurements of their own and has ever felt like an outcast or not whole because of it. She even was willing to turn to the Storm King for help just because she believed even he of all people actually would help her, and clearly even the slightest chance that anypony cared about her was what she wanted more than anything else; unfortunately, as it turned out, not only did the Storm King end up betraying, but he really couldn't have cared less, and that flippant attitude of his actually really made his betrayal of Tempest all the more hurtful. He didn't do it out of purposeful maliciousness, he just didn't give a shit to begin with, and for a pony like Tempest, so desperate for any measure of love or care, such a glib attitude about her problems had to hurt more than even deliberate hatred from him would have. Thankfully, through a combination of words and deeds, Twilight and her friends are able to show Tempest the light by the end of the movie, and she in turn turns her back on the Storm King and helps them all save the day, finally finding a place among her kind, even without her horn restored. Of all of the new characters who should make a return to the show, Tempest is by far the one I'd like to see the most, though I'd certainly love to see them all at some point again (aside from the Storm King of course, considering he kinda caught a case of "death-by-shattering-into-a-million-pieces-of-stone-itis"), including Grubber, the Sky Pirates, Capper, and most definitely Queen Novo, Princess Skystar, and the other Sea Ponies/Hippogriffs (one has to wonder now if they'll end up all becoming hippogriffs again now that the Storm King is no longer threatening their land). Every single one of their celebrity voice actors, from Emily Blunt, Liev Schreiber, Kristin Chenoweth, Michael Peña, Sia, Taye Diggs, Zoe Saldana, and Uzo Adaba, all did a smashing good job, did not sound in the slightest like they were phoning in their performances, and seemed to genuinely enjoy playing these roles, and I commend them all for that, especially Blunt, who probably had the hardest job of the bunch in having to play as serious and straight of a role as Tempest Shadow. Other children's television shows and movie adaptations, take notes, THIS is how you make great use of celebrity guest actors; you give them actually important, well-written characters to work with, not just sloppily put together and poorly thought out roles that solely exist to make room for the celebrities themselves (I'm looking at you Disney, wasting Kristin Chenoweth of all people in dreck as bad as Descendants, FOR SHAME!!!). As for the returning cast, most of them had strong showings and all of them were exactly in character as they should be. The two exceptions are Fluttershy and Applejack; while both of them had a few moments here and there, neither of them had too much time explicitly devoted to featuring them, especially Fluttershy, and that's a damn shame. It wasn't bad enough that I think the movie's creators did them wrong or anything, not at all, it just felt like when it came down to picking who they were gonna focus on, they took the easy route and chose the more flamboyant and energetic characters from the Mane 6 with the biggest fanbases to feature, so it's just disappointing that longtime fans didn't get to see Fluttershy and Applejack really shine in a feature length film and first time viewers didn't get to see what makes these two characters so very special. That said, they had enough moments that I was sated with what we got, and they probably still got more moments than Spike did (who oddly enough probably had fewer major moments than Grubber did, which is just weird, but he had his moments too nonetheless). After that, Rarity probably had the 4th most amount of screentime of any Mane 6 character, and while she didn't get her own solo song number like Pinkie Pie and Rarity did, she still sang a few times and did get a wonderful scene where she got to display her generosity to Capper, which started his path to reform in a quiet and very nicely handled way. She also got some of the biggest laughs of the movie, more so I would argue in her visual humor than in any of her lines; I mean don't get me wrong, Tabitha was as funny as ever, but the animators made full use of a character as flamboyant as her and gave her some wildly funny expressions and visual gags (my personal favorite being her checking her appearance in a mirror in the middle of falling to her doom, good Lord that was perfect ). Rainbow Dash had a very strong showing for the most part and got about as much screentime as I'd expect her to get in a movie like this, but thankfully it never felt like they were egregiously turning the movie into "The Rainbow Dash Show" just to sate or please her huge fanbase, and her shining moment in inspiring Captain Celaeno and the Sky Pirates felt perfect for her, so I can't fault the writers for giving her that. Intriguingly enough, not just Twilight but Pinkie Pie as well were the two most important members of the Mane 6 here, and while for one that's hardly surprising, for the other it is slightly more so, but I think I know why. Twilight featuring front and center for the Mane 6 isn't surprising at all, and I long ago accepted that she will always be the main character of this show (even if one could argue she was not the most important character in certain seasons like Season 7). For a movie, it makes perfect sense that the centerfold character should feature more than anyone else. What was somewhat annoying was that we went through very old Twilight problems in a large amount of this film, like her worrying too much about a special event going correctly, or her losing faith in the power of friendship and trying to do things the easy way instead. Despite the size of the threat, and it was a major threat, make no mistake, it still felt a little tired to go through these problems for Twilight between Season 7 and Season 8, and it kind of reinforces arguments that this movie should have come out sooner; if this had happened in canon anywhere from Season 3 to Season 5 I probably could have bought Twilight being this insecure about these things, but she hasn't been such a worry wart in quite a long time now. I believe it was mostly so that newer audiences could get an idea for what things Twilight tends to worry about, as well as simply because it gave the film some more conflict for the Mane 6 itself (not to mention it tied Twilight's arc somewhat into Tempest's as well), so for the most part its forgivable enough, but it definitely feels redundant at times. However, Pinkie Pie as the second most important member of the crew was not an issue at all. At first glance it seems fairly obvious that she'd be one of the top 3 most featured characters of the group considering she has a large following, is very recognizable, and is already the funniest pony out of the bunch, or at least the biggest source of comedy (as she easily is here). But interestingly enough she was NOT just comedic relief, and that's where her performance was truly outstanding. Pinkie Pie, while not stupid by any stretch of the imagination, has in my opinion the simplest and most basic belief in the power of the friendship between herself and all her friends. That's not to insult her understanding of it or anything, it's just not really nuanced or complex for her (not taking some of her past insecurities into account, of course); she knows it's a wonderful thing, she believes in it more easily than any of her other friends, and she never loses faith in it or what it can accomplish. Facing as big of a threat as they do, that faith is incredibly important, and Pinkie frequently keeps the group going and does her best to bolster spirits however she can without largely ever batting an eye, and this is best displayed in two scenes. First, she tries to get exactly what they need from the sea ponies simply by showing them that the ponies are worth caring about through the simplest of actions, showing that they themselves care about the sea ponies and are willing to give them their time, even as their home is threatened and in terrible danger, enjoying the simplest of activities with one another because the sea ponies could use it, having had it pretty rough for some time hiding away from the rest of the world. And the best part is that was all going to work, before Twilight tried stealing the sea ponies magical pearl behind their backs and got the group banished. Afterwards, her next most important scene happens when Pinkie finally angrily confronts Twilight about her losing her faith in their friendship and trying to do things the wrong way, and in that moment she is the perfect choice for expressing the entire group's feelings towards Twilight. It's a rough scene to watch, but it makes sense why she's so angry seeing her longtime friend completely turn her back on doing things the right way, the way they know will work even if it's not always easy. It's raw, it's powerful, and it's one of Pinkie's most mature scenes ever. So her serving as the heart of the group here worked just fine by me, especially when one considers that this is but one of their dozens of adventures that they've had by now, and that all of them have had different moments to shine in each and every one. Someone is always stepping up when the moment calls for it, and this time it just so happened to be Pinkie, who as far as I'm concerned had the best arc of them all, especially since Twilight's was a little more standard and predictable for her and this kind of movie. That said, on the whole I thought that all of the Mane 6 (and Spike) had as a group the movie they needed; like many of their earlier adventures, this was most definitely more ensemble performance of the group as a whole than any one character (besides Twilight and to some extent Pinkie) dominating most of the screen time, and seeing as for many people this would be their first exposure to the Mane 6, it makes perfect sense that this is how the movie's creators would want to portray them. The nuance and complexity we longtime fans know is there for all of them is for the show itself, while here, we got mostly the basics, but also enough information that it was clear there's a lot of history and complexity to these characters beneath the surface. I'm having a hard time imagining how it really could have been better for them, so as far as I'm concerned, this was exactly the showing we deserved from our favorite group of ponies. As for supporting characters and background ponies, believe it or not, they didn't have nearly as much to do as we usually have come to expect from them. I suppose the princesses getting into trouble was nothing new on their end, but even the background ponies didn't do much in their cameos aside from look miserable a lot once they'd been enslaved by the Storm King's forces. Overall this wasn't terribly surprising given that the movie had so many new characters to introduce (who had background characters themselves, including an adorable sea pony foal who had some incredibly cute cameos). HOWEVER, there was a big, big, BIG exception to that general rule, one that pleased me GREATLY! That's right, in a giant love letter to the fans, none other than the greatest background pony of them all, Derpy Hooves, quite intentionally took a figurative bullet for the team when she desperately shoved Twilight out of the way from a magically enchanted item that Tempest had thrown at her to turn her into stone, saving Twilight's life and pretty much saving the day in doing so. Sure she spent the rest of the movie encased in stone, but by the end of it she was released and back to normal, good as new! It's an awesome shoutout to the fandom and lovers of Derpy like myself, and of all the background ponies to get that kind of love, she deserved it more than anypony else. Music The music in this movie quite evidently channels the general sound and feel of more Broadway-esque Disney showtunes of the past, particularly the grandly staged numbers of the Disney Renaissance. That doesn't mean like it ever feels like Daniel Ingram straight up lifted any tunes from Disney, oh no, it's just clear what his inspiration was. On the contrary, the music is great as ever, and each piece (unlike more thematically consistent Disney pieces) feel very unique and like they could be in a different movie altogether, but here it works since they're usually staged in radically different settings. The biggest exception to this rule, of course, is Sia's number at the end, but even that works just fine for what it is, even if it sounds the least like a song we'd expect to hear in this show. We Got This Together - The first number is a fun and fairly standard Mane 6 ensemble. Nothing particularly notable about it aside from it having a very pleasant tune, and I never complain about all of the Mane 6 singing together (which happens in most song numbers in this film, but it is most deliberately centered on them here). In fact I actually think the most memorable thing about this song is that it really was one of the first points where the movie truly got to show off its animation. Sure we'd already seen how different it all looked for about 10 minutes by that point, but this gave us a fun tour around Canterlot for about three and a half minutes, and all with a fun song playing to go along with it. A fun, solid opening number to be sure. I'm The Friend You Need - THIS song is where the movie's soundtrack really began to shine. "We Got This Together" is a great number in its own right, but it also sounds very familiar for the show. "I'm The Friend You Need," however is a tango sung by a male character (male characters of note being rare as it is in the show, it's even rarer one getting to sing), a style we've really never gotten to hear on the show before, and goodness me is it deliciously fun. Taye Diggs's vocals especially sell the number, and its visuals are quite fun to boot, with the ponies unsettling settings delightfully contrasting their Equestrian-selves. Time To Be Awesome - "Time To Be Awesome," in my humble opinion, is actually Rainbow Dash's single best song ever. It's kind of the anti-"I'll Fly" of her song numbers - while that song, from "Tanks for the Memories," has a good tune, it's also about her not giving a buck about how her trying to keep winter from happening is going to buck everypony else over all so she can just spend more time with Tank. The message never sat right with me or many other Rainbow Dash fans, not because the show was trying to sell it as the right thing, but because by making it such an upbeat tune, they kinda made it sound like the Element of Loyalty quite literally stabbing everyone else in the back was a good thing. "Time To Be Awesome," on the other hand, is the polar opposite. It has Rainbow Dash channeling all of her best qualities to lift others up and remind them that if they're willing to do it, it's not so hard for anyone to be awesome. That's Rainbow's loyalty at its best, when it inspires other to be their best selves. It doesn't hurt that both Ashleigh Ball and Zoe Saldana absolutely kill it on their vocals, and the kickass Celtic/Gaelic instrumentals (at certain points, sometimes mixed in with a dash of pirate-tune instrumentals to give it a swashbuckling feel when some of the pirates sing their own verses, including one voiced by none other than Nicole Oliver) are quite awesome as well. By far one of the best original tunes in the movie, it's only slightly soured by the fact that Rainbow Dash completely bucks everypony over, including the sky pirates she just inspired, when she hilariously unnecessarily does a Sonic Rainboom at the end, drawing the attention of Tempest Shadow and her forces. But ah well, that's RD for ya, and we love her for it. One Small Thing - BY FAR my favorite song of the entire. This song is catchy as hell. Repeat after me. This. Bucking. Song. Is. Catchy. As. Hell. It is everything I would ever want musically out of an MLP movie number. Memorable lyrics, a bouncy and deliciously fun tune, fun instrumentals, and bucking operatic singer Shannon-Chan Kent as Pinkie Pie and MOTHERBUCKING GEM OF BROADWAY Kristin Chenoweth as Princess Skystar. Holy shit, that is a delicious duo of amazing singing voices that absolutely delivered 1000000%, seriously, my choral singing self was so pleased by this. The second I heard Kristin Chenoweth was gonna be in this movie I could not wait to hear her sing in MLP and knew very well that her song could easily end up being my favorite of the movie, and my instincts were bucking right. She and Shannon-Chan were gems together and the song itself is insanely fun. On top of that, as with "Time To Be Awesome," it was yet another Mane 6 member at their best, this time Pinkie Pie getting to show how much just showing ponies a fun time can mean so much to them. She helps an entire city of exiled hippogriffs come out of their shells and simply enjoy themselves without even asking for anything in return, and until Twilight was caught trying to steal the sea ponies magic pearl, it was going to actually turn the sea ponies/hippogriffs into their allies. The way Kristin Chenoweth sells her own vocals, you can simply feel how much everything that Pinkie is doing for them means to them. A song like this is MLP in its purest form and one of the biggest reasons I have always loved the show, and definitely ranks up their with some of Pinkie Pie's most legendary song numbers like "The Smile Song." This song is pure joy and I love it so much!!! Open Up Your Eyes - This is, objectively speaking, probably the best song in the movie in terms of what it does for the plot itself. "Open Up Your Eyes" is not just a villain song, but a song that tells a story. Tempest's story. In it we get her entire worldview laid bare, and it's rather heart wrenching once it is all laid bare before us. Tempest is simply a loner who, by and large doesn't put her faith or trust in pretty much anyone at all after feeling dejected for so much of her life as a result of her injuries and dangerous broken horn. She only trusts raw power and those with it who she believes might actually care enough to help her, or at least give her what she wants if she does enough for them first. What comes next for her after she fixes her horn, who knows? We never get that far, and it doesn't seem clear that Tempest knows either what she ultimately wants. First and foremost, she just wants to feel whole again, because she feels like that's the only way her life might mean anything again. It's tragic, utterly tragic, and the soft visuals when her backstory unfolds make it even more so. It looks like the memory of a child laid bare, something innocent that goes so terribly wrong because of one accidental moment that never should have happened and changed so much for her. So as far as villain songs in general go, it's very unique. It's not a villain just cackling out their plan in song, or how evil they are or how happy they are that they're about to win. It's Tempest just telling Twilight a story and telling her to stop believing that her idea of Equestria and friendship is right, that the world is just a cold, dark place that will crush you if you let it, and the only way to keep that from happening is to crush others first. Tempest isn't exactly happy about this, she just wholeheartedly believes it, and when we see that, we see just how tragic as a villain she is. It's probably the best villain song that MLP has ever had and easily blows "This Day Aria," out of the water, though again, I must emphasize that it is hardly a traditional villain song, and may not even entirely fit that category. Rainbow - Sia sings a Sia song in MLP. That's it. What else do you want me to say? I mean it's a good song, even if it is radically different from the rest of the movie's soundtrack. I think what I most appreciated about it was that it was slow, like the movie was exhaling. It could've taken an easy route and been faster and more upbeat, ya know, a kind of party dance tune like so many kids movies these days end with, but instead it went for something a bit more emotional and quiet, and I really liked that. It doesn't feel like the ponies are moving on from a frantic climax to a frantic party, but instead are just breathing easily, enjoying one another's company quietly after saving the day yet again, and that everything is going to be OK, even for Tempest. The single most disappointing thing about it really is simply that Sia's character was literally in this movie just to sing that song. I mean, she shows up to Canterlot, sings some kind of awkward pop-jail number for 10 seconds (seriously, that was a weird scene and I have no idea why she of all ponies gave Twilight a meaningful look when she got back to Canterlot given that they'd known each other for a total of five bucking seconds), and then sings this song at the end. Honestly I think it would have been better if she just straight up showed up at the end of the movie for the first time, like her travel was delayed or something. At least it would have felt more honest then as opposed to her showing up at the beginning of the film. But anyway, yeah, I liked this song a lot and had no trouble with it being at the end of the film. There's about seven other songs on the MLP: The Movie soundtrack, and I can't speak to all of them since I haven't heard all of them yet. Some of them are covers of older songs, like their "Thank You For Being A Friend" cover (which is deliciously hilarious in concept but also is actually quite lovely the way they did it), and some are original numbers, like Lukas Graham's "Off To See The World," which you may have heard in the MLP: The Movie trailer and credits (and as much as I hate to admit it, I actually quite like the song, despite hating Lukas Graham and his annoying, smug Danish ass himself - seriously, who has a shoutout to themselves in one of their own songs about how humble they're supposed to be in the face of fame, that's so bucking stupid and asinine?!?!). Overall, I'd say pretty much every soundtrack number from the movie itself is more than worth adding to your music library, and if you haven't done so, you really should, they're all quite excellent and perfect for this particular project, definitely some of Daniel Ingram's best work to date, especially given what he was asked to do in making music so different from MLP's normal fare. Animation The animation in "My Little Pony: The Movie" is radically different from the normal fare we're used to in the show. The show utilizes about as advanced of Adobe Flash animation as one could possibly hope to achieve with that technology, but even so it is still distinctly CARTOON animation meant for television. The movie, on the other hand, uses Toon Boom Harmony, which has been used by movies like "The Princess and the Frog" and television shows like "The Simpsons" (at least since the mid-2000s). According to art director Rebecca Dart, they wanted to keep to the look and feel of the television show, and the use of Toon Boom Harmony enabled them to add "simple yet impactful changes" to the designs for the big screen, such as depth and shadows for their eyes and ears, and the impression of heart-shaped indentations on the bottom of their hooves. Some CGI models are sprinkled here and there, especially for some of the larger ships or objects, and while they look a bit out of place they looked overall much better in the final product than they initially did in some of the early trailers. Overall, while this animation is hardly groundbreaking or revolutionary, the distinctive look for this movie is very appreciated and very much sets it apart from the show and other MLP productions as its own uniquely animated feature. It's so polished that you can't help but appreciate how much hard work the production crew put into bringing this movie to the big screen using a completely new animation style, and is one of the most apparent testaments as to how sincerely this production crew worked to make an actually, objectively good movie and not just a quick cash grab. Themes As I've said throughout this review, a movie based on a show as long-running as MLP:FiM has to try to encompass the most general, basic elements that have garnered the show as much of a fandom as it has built up through the years, and this applies to the themes of the movie as much as anything else. They're probably the simplest part of the movie if I'm being honest, with the most complex elements entering in Tempest's story. Just because they're simple, however, doesn't mean they're not delivered well. The biggest theme that sits square at the center of the movie is just a downright simple, steadfast faith in the power of friendship to overcome all sorts of troubles that life may throw your way. The Mane 6 don't just embody this in how they stick together throughout the film, but also in how everywhere they go, they affect someone else's lives with their friendship. From Capper being reformed from his con artist ways after being touched by Rarity's simple act of generosity in fixing up his clothes, the Sky Pirates loyally standing by the ponies after Rainbow Dash inspires them to take up their Sky Pirate mantle once more, Pinkie Pie giving the sea ponies a day of joy and revelry like they haven't had in quite some time, and Twilight herself going out of her way to save Tempest even after all Tempest had done to almost destroy Equestria and her friends and loved ones. Sure, this movie doesn't exactly create the wheel, but it is utterly confident in what its theme is, sticks to it, and executes it as proficiently as it could. That right there, that focused and very clear-cut theme that is repeatedly reinforced through the movie, is very much worth commending given that so many children's films these days seem incapable of even justifying the reason for their existence and seem downright as aimless as they are pointless. Concluding Thoughts This was the movie I wanted. I'm not saying everyone else has to think of the film exactly as I did, but for me, a guy who's been a brony since 2012, this was exactly the feature length, theatrical film version of MLP:FiM that I have wanted for years. It didn't try to do too much, but it also had a point and purpose for its existence. It wasn't revolutionary, but it was clearly ambitious and well-crafted all the same. It was mostly made for fans, but invited first-time viewers just enough that some might be willing to come back for seconds in the show itself if they paid attention closely enough. Most importantly, it accurately reflected and embraced everything we've come to love about the show itself through the years, but simply did so in a film format. At the end of the day, no matter how different it looks or sounds or how much longer it is or how many celeb voice actors it had, "My Little Pony: The Movie" is distinctly, unmistakably as much a part of that universe as anything from the show ever has been. No compromise, no watering it down, this was a pure, unadulterated MLP:FiM experience, a love letter to Generation 4 of My Little Pony and all of its fans, and a true testament to how wildly popular this show still is and how loyal its fans remain to both the show itself, but more importantly, its core themes and messages. As the old saying goes, if it ain't broke, don't fix it, and the creators of "My Little Pony: The Movie" clearly recognized that they didn't exactly have to change all that much in translating this television show to the big screen. I thank them for that, for embracing this show and all of its elements, and for giving us a truly memorable, fun, and downright thoroughly enjoyable cinematic experience!
  9. Tried to ponify the reference pic in the corner using fashion pony. Ran into trouble when trying to translate the legs of the woman. I don't think there's any feasible way for a pony to sit and have their legs positioned like that. So I settled for this: Where one legs is on the stool going straight out and the other off the stool straight down(sorta like the pic.) Which sucks because the legs were a really cool part of the pose Also the Celestia painting was originally a stallion in the reference, it was actually really fun getting her pose in there.
  10. Giving my theory on why this ship is teased by the show, and why IMO , they will go with it in the future. Comments are Welcomed
  11. Hello everypony, So according to the rumors, G5 will come up and the bases and the drawing lines and styles of the ponies are already ready. Here is how some of our characters from G4 will look like in G5 version according to rumors; What do you think? Are these rumors true? Do you like these styles? If not, would you appreciate if this was a thing? Thank you for reading! <3
  12. This is my first PMV, and of course it centers around Rarity x Spike (Sparity) of My Little Pony : Friendship Is Magic. Song used is "Hello" by Lionel Richie Comments are Welcomed
  13. Okay, so ponies wearing socks has been a thing for a while now (since mid 2011). WHY SOCKS- and How did this all start?!?! Ponies already have hooves!!. (I know that goofiness has to be at least part of the whole socks thing) Supposedly in early 2011 EQD posted a picture of some random MLP socks for sale at Target, which inspired someone to make this picture: Which launched the fandom's pony sock factory explosion... But WAIT THERE'S MORE... Supposedly G3's pony Minty (Voiced By Tabitha St. Germain) really liked socks in some Christmas movie... Tabitha currently voices Rarity... ...WHO... HAS SOCKS!! ??????? (Shown in Sisterhooves Social, which coincidentally aired at the beginning of the fad, but was animated before it.) SO... why am I bringing this up now? Well, It's something that I've wondered about off and on for a while. A couple days ago I was watching a blind reaction by someone new to the fandom who currently doesn't look into much fandom stuff to avoid spoilers and this happened... https://youtu.be/ueH320Dny3k?t=4m57s And I was like THAT'S ENOUGH ALREADY!!! ANSWER TIME! Personally I don't care for the ponies with socks thing. I just find it visually jarring and weird looking most of the time, with some exceptions. I don't hate it, I've always found it really odd. Part of it is a carry over from real life. Long socks, tights, stockings, etc, on girls for whatever reason are just like nails on a chalkboard to me. I just hate how it looks- major turn off. The funny thing is I have no idea why either! Oh, and I just HATE those socks with the individual toes. Enough about my ranting: So do you know anything more about how the fad started? What's your opinion on the sock thing? Has your opinion changed over the past couple years?
  14. I really hope they do. Twilight really couldn't have become an alicorn without them. Also, Twilight will never die and the rest of the mane six will grow old and go to pony heaven. I mean, there's a place for them in her castle and if they passed away... Anyways, what do you think and/or hope about them becoming alicorns? Alicorn mane six- http://www.fimfiction-static.net/images/story_images/5291_r.jpg (I don't own this! Just Googled it, saw this and thought it was 20% cooler than what I could draw!) Sorry, the link doesn't work. But if you type it in it should.
  15. So let me start off by saying that I do NOT intend to start a flame war here. I'm just trying to figure out what seems to be the most canon ship in the entire show. (then again, I've only just watched up to episode 10 of Season 2, so there's still stuff I'm still not aware of) There's nothing really wrong with the whole thing, right? But yet, there does seem to be a problem with it. I still can't help but think it's strange.Forgetting that they're different species (that doesn't really matter), I can't help but wonder; wait, Spike's a baby dragon, right? And I'm going to assume Rarity is a filly or something close to an adult, right?Now perhaps being a baby dragon means he could be closer to fifteen or sixteen when it comes to human years, since dragons in most fantasy settings tend to live for thousands of years. But even still, something about how small he is coupled with the fact that he is constantly referred to as a baby dragon kind of bothers me. All the innocent kissing is fine, but honestly after watching that episode it really seemed like it was a little more than that. I mean, he was going to confess his love to her right when he thought they were going to die. That was pretty intense.Bravo to the writers for doing something like this in what started as a children's cartoon. And honestly, I do like the whole Spike x Rarity ship. I love it in fact. But at the same time, I still can't help but find it strange.No flame war intended, and I hope I am not the only one who feels this way. I am still kind of newborn brony after all...
  16. Well, alot of people are talking on the "Will Sparity ever happen?" post, and a majority of you say it ain't happening. Well, how about this? Do you think Spike's crush on Rarity is ever going to END on the show? Or, do you think something else will happen like Spike will become a pony and grow older for a day to finally date her? I think the former is the logical choice. It's gotta happen sooner or later. It's been 3 years in-show time, and the crush is STILL going on, and Rarity is still taking advantage over it to make him do stuff he might not actually wanna do! Would give Spike some much-needed development on the matter, and I dunno if their relationship can grow any higher than just agreeing to be the best of friends! Whether Spike gets a new crush or not, Spike decides to let Rarity down, she decides to let him down, I don't care how they do it! I just know this subject will be mentioned! What do you think is gonna happen, and if you don't think Sparity is happening, do you think it's gonna end eventually?
  17. Before I made it to Equestria LA, I went and did another Splatfest and decided "Ya know what? I'm gonna take one and choose Fantasy over Sci-Fi." I was able to reach Queen Level before departing. And I came back in time to learn that Team Fantasy won. To celebrate, here's Rarity as the Queen of Fantasy(Not that kind of Fantasy you silly) Stay tuned tomorrow. I'll have the Equestria LA drawings up.
  18. This is a digital art I made of the fabulous Rarity and the adorable Sweetie Belle together, based on the episode Sisterhooves Social. It was made on the program GIMP using a digital tablet and took 211 minutes to make. I hope you enjoy and feel free to offer any thoughts you have on it.
  19. So, anyways, Nightmarity was made a purchaseable character in the gameloft game recently (FOR TWENTY FREAKING DOLLARS at that). To my knowledge, prior to this there have been no comics only characters sold in the gameloft game, they've all had to be in the show or movie first. Think this is just them grabbing a popular comic character, of possibility of nightmarity in the future?
  20. With any film based on a comic book, a novel, or a live-action or animated tv show, there's going to be nitpicks from fans about certain characters not being used correctly, to the main cast being ooc, etc... With the MLP Movie, it's no different, and here I'm going to discuss 4 of them, that I touched upon in my video version of this topic. 1. The Princesses (minus Twilight) being useless again. Now let me (IMO) tell you why this happened. As a kid of the 80s, I've seen Hasbro do this before (Transformers : The Movie, G.I. Joe : The Movie, Etc..), and the reason they do this is to put focus on The "MANE" group of characters that the film needs to be focused on. For if they had all 4 Princesses out and about, pretty much any fan knows that if they combined their powers, this invasion wouldn't last very long. So they had to figure out a way to basically pull a "PRIME/DUKE" moment with Celestria, Luna, and Cadance, and did so, by having Tempest use that green orb thing to turn them into glass stone. By doing this, it puts the focus on Twilight and friends having to find a way to save the day (ala, 1986 TF MOVIE and 1987 JOE MOVIE). So for anyone that was upset by this, well hopefully I gave a good reason on why this happened. 2. Twilight acting OOC. This seems to be a topic from the film, that has many fans up in arms. Well, let me explain why Twilight was like this:. You see Twilight was already putting a lot of pressure on herself by putting together this first-ever Friendship Festival, then all of sudden this hostile takeover from The Storm King happens, her Mentor's and sister-in-law get turned to stone, and the only clue she has to save their home, is "hippos". And if that's not enough, it seems her friends weren't taking this too seriously, from trusting someone, who originally wanted to sell them into slavery to pay off a debt, to befriending pirates, by helping them get their mojo back, and then doing a Sonic Rainboom, when they shouldn't have, to finally the last straw being, that the one character that Celestria had mentioned could help, turning them down, thus causing Twilight to attempt to steal the hippogriff's transformation orb, to her friends calling her out on it, while discovering at the same time that Twilight was just using them to make Skystar "happy" so she could try and attempt the thief. So as for Twilight acting OOC, you really can't blame her. I mean even in real life, if someone is going through a lot and has a lot on their mind at the same time, and it takes one little moment or comment from someone to set them off, of course their going to lash out and say things that they don't really mean. And that's exactly what Twilight did, everything just came to a boiling point, and Pinkie calling her out for what she just did, that was the straw that broke the camel's back. But what you see afterwards (off/on screen), is both regret the blow up they had, and both sides realize that they should have worked together, not against each other. 3. The Storm King not being a good villan. As I said in the video version of this, I think when fans see this character, they see this film's equvenlet of Starscream from Transformers. Being a long-time fan of the Transformers, I saw Starscream as a usurper that wanted control of the Deceptions from Megatron, but was always foiled in the end, and the reason was because Starscream was shown as not being ready to yield such power or knowing what to do with it, once he had it. That is somewhat how some fans viewed the Storm King, Tempest promised and gave him the power he craved, but he really wasn't ready for it and like Starscream in several Transformers incarnations, it cost him his life in the end. 4. Where were the other characters, like Discord, Shining Armor, etc...?, Well since this was made around seasons 4-6, they could have been incorporated into the film. But they (the writers) wanted the main focus to be on the MANE 6 and yes even the Newer characters. Besides, as I meantiond with the Princesses above, if Discord was around, we probably wouldn't have much of a takeover would we, and who's to say he didn't suffer the same fate as the 3 Princesses (but off screen), I'm just saying. And if you must know, this is a staple of any Hasbro and Toy-based animated features, certain characters will be involved in the film, but mostly off-screen (ex. '86 TF Film, had several Autobot deaths off-screen), so just because we don't see them doing something on-screen, doesn't mean that they aren't part of the story in someway. But that's all have to say in this written version of what I said on video about Nitpicks some fans have with this film. Let me know what you all think. God Bless and Take Care.
  21. Josh Haber extended his résumé quite a bit since joining FIM back in Season 4. During that time, he published and edited a combination of the good, the bad, and the average. He wrote really good episodes like Re-Mark and Bloom & Gloom, yet edited Season 6, the worst of the series, and helped write To Where and Back Again, FIM’s worst finale. For most of Season 7, he was absent while working on another show. One week ago, he made his return joining the Lady Writers as editor for Daring Done? In his first written episode since To Where, Haber showed his growth and wrote Season 7’s most surprising amethyst. Strengths: Colorful characters. Ponyville’s charm comes from its cast. With the tertiary and background characters, Mane is no exception. Just about every character in this episode is very likeable. Filthy Rich in his desire to find the right flower bouquet for his Spoiled wife. Mr. Breezy and Davenport in trying to improve customer service and sales. The flower trio using Rarity’s advice to select and sell bouquets easier. Townsponies weren’t only interested in listening to Rarity’s advice, but also receptive to each other. It feels like the town actually likes each other and wants to help one another. Pay attention very closely to two very clever continuity nods in the background. As the flower trio sold out, Granny and Grand Pear were next door in the booth the entire time, cluing those who watched The Perfect Pear they put the past and feud behind them permanently. In the beginning shot, look very closely: Apple Bloom and Burnt Oak conversing. >BM and Sugar Belle… Seriously, good to see the show continue building the relationship after a massive screwup. One of the ponies to catch my eye most was Daisy and how receptive and kind she was to Rarity the entire time. Only a few episodes ago, she and Diamond Cutter denigrated her behind her back and was part of the anti-Rarity boycott. It was one of the most out-of-character moments of the entire show, ’cause this normally sweet pony bashed a supposed friend. Here, it’s like none of that happened, and everything returned to normal. Thank Mama Celestia! However, the background characters share their role. Fluttershy, Dash, AJ, TS, SG, and Zecora do, too, in their own ways. Zecora: Over the years, she has appeared very sporadically, sometimes only making two appearances for an entire season. In her first speaking appearance since Re-Mark, she clearly points out which item is which. True, Zecora could’ve labeled them, but the conflict and accident aren’t her fault whatsoever and, thus, not a flaw in the episode at all. She pointed with her hoof which is the shampoo and which is the remover potion. Rarity’s accident caused the mix-up. Telling Rarity to conclude Act 2 she can’t brew a potion in time is a breath of fresh air, particularly in a show where magic’s sometimes considered the be-all end-all. To conclude Act 2 or the episode as a whole with Zecora saying she got one available right now would be as anticlimactic as Dragon Quest. Fluttershy, RD, and AJ: Like any good friend, they try fixing Rarity’s mane as a last resort. Each of their choice for wig works, because they’re familiar with the items they share with her: tree leaves, cloud moisture, and straw. Rarity desperately wants to be in the photo shoot, but can’t with her mane so messy, and with their last resort being a failure, it leads to Rarity having to cancel. Why does this work? Because they’re doing whatever they can to help her. Their wig creations are intended to help Rarity, and both she and the audience get it. Twilight & Starlight: They, too, tried their best to help. Alas, it wasn’t meant to be. Although there was a clever callback to Re-Mark: More about them a little later. Of the RM7, the character that got my attention the most was Applejack. Over the past few seasons, when they communicate, it’s if they can’t stand each other rather than the opposite (Made in Manehattan exempt). Here, after Rarity sulked to the point of downing tubs of ice cream, AJ turned on the light and had enough. This is exactly who she should be: honest to the point of saying the uncomfortable truth, yet do so because she cares for her. Now, a good episode doesn’t require background ponies to be involved in the episode. But when done right, it makes Ponyville feel more like a town and community. It does that here. Rarity. It ain’t a good episode if the star isn’t written well. She was written well here. Every line she spoke oozed with personality: confident, sassy, vain, unsure, hopeless, upset. She reacted to specific situations she was involved in, whether it’s having super-sticky string bound to her body, accidently applying remover potion on her mane, and so forth. One criticism I noticed of this episode from an analyst is he called the salesponies in the town dumb for not recognizing Rarity under her black cloak. There’s a problem with the argument. Rarity completely covered her entire body aside from her hooves and face with a large cloak. When Rose tried to peak underneath, Rarity shyly refused from fear of ostracization and embarrassment. A few times, she pulled her hood down, once after opening Mr. Breezy’s door and as she headed to Davenport’s auction, possibly to keep her identity hidden. By how the episode was structured, Rarity apparently looked forward into taking part of Vanity Mare and Photo Finish’s photoshoot. How long? Not stated. Although you can guess it was scheduled well in advance. Her self-assurance was obvious throughout the opener by how she used her mane proudly during the three scenes. Being no shortage of ego, it ain’t a surprising for her to flash or focus her proud locks. The accident was so sudden and so close to the date of the shoot that she was desperate in trying anything to fix it. Borrow a Crystal Pony’s glass-like mane, mask it with a beautiful dress, use a cloud or straw, have Zecora quick-brew a potion to revert the mane to its original state. When her wig options dried out, she was forced to cancel her shoot, which she longed planned for and visibly upset her. From all the buildup and the RM4 worrying about her wellbeing, her iconic meltdown isn’t treated as a joke. Her disappointment and sadness are real. Nothing is exaggerated. Consider this: If by chance you lose your hair through some kind of accident before some kind of important event, how would you feel? It makes sense in Rarity’s character to be so upset. Good for DHX and Haber to treat her situation seriously. When life gives you lemons, make lemonade! Getting back to Starlight and Twilight, some lines grabbed my attention: How significant are these lines? Very. A magical boundary within this world is established. It doesn’t matter how rich the world of ponies is. Without rules, you arbitrarily pull solutions out of your basket. Worldbuilding is fun, but it’s equally important to sit back and cut off possible shortcuts. Look no further than Twilight having only a few minutes to become one with a book and griffons never getting cutie marks. Twilight, Starlight, and Zecora (from earlier) inform and remind her that magic doesn’t come out of thin air. You need something of substance to create the magic. Rarity’s mane is so shredded and damaged by Zecora’s remover potion that re-growing her mane with magic’s even riskier. So, what about the mustache and poison joke? The mustache temporarily grows above the lip. At some point, it either disappears or falls off. Rarity pleaded to grow her mane back to what it used to be as a permanent solution. Rarity’s mane and tail were fully grown when the poison joke made dreadlocks out of her fur and hair. With most of her violet hair missing, there’s no guarantee if she’ll be poisoned the same way. Once more, the poison is temporary; a bath reverts the joke. Mane sticks to their established guidelines of Equestrian magic. Like Zecora’s quick brew, finding a spell to revert the potion’s effects is anticlimactic and contrived, neither of which this episode needs. More importantly, they set up the platitude expressed by AJ and FS: Older than time, but its truism helps circulate it and not expire. Rarity is one such pony capable of turning around a worst-case scenario. Just two questions: How can she overcome this horrific problem, and what can her friends do to help her? Twilight answers the latter: With Rarity at her lowest point in a few years, comforting her makes sense. This trek commences this conversation chain, including feeling guilty for canceling her photoshoot and believing to be a fad the entire time, her friends reminding her of the goals she accomplished, and Twilight nudging a lesson of self-confidence to get by her difficult situation. Here, we’re reminded of one important detail: Throughout Act 2, she assumed that ponies looked at her differently because her mane is missing. Again, that’s not true. Everyone she came across knows her for her pizzazz, ability to help others, and inherent command for attention. How big of an ego does the Element of Generosity have? Really big. Yet, they never ostracized her for not being pretty. She isolated herself and desired to blend in, an act they see as out of character of her if they knew it was her. Rarity was so shy around the merchants that she refused attention. The townsponies weren’t acting like jerks at any point. So, with the barriers of what ponies can’t do with magic, Rarity’s desperation and depression, and their words of encouragement, what do you get? Three things: Reinvigoration of Rarity’s self-worth. Kickass Rari-punk mane. And one of the cleverest and smartest resolutions of the series. Although she canceled the shoot, her decision worked out for everyone. Rarity’s lavender order was left over, so Filthy was able to give his spoiled wife bouquets of her flowers for Mare’s Day. Mr. Breezy relocated his large fan outside his shop, allowing traffic to interact with it firsthand. Davenport’s chaise is sold. Everyone picked up the best possible. (Good for the show to have Rarity’s mane grow naturally.) Yet, if that wasn’t enough… Warm cup of karma. Although Rarity canceled the shoot, Photo Finish took pictures of her as she ventured through Ponyville, courtesy of her friends. Sure, this ending is sorta Hollywood-ish, but Rarity underwent a literal bad hair day and then attached her newfound look to spread goodwill to everypony that having her front and center of Vanity Mare magazine makes sense. Negotiating with Photo reinforces how much they care for Rarity and will do anything to make her feel better. Mane comes full circle with the ending. Good at what it doesn’t do! Back when I first heard about Mane, I was concerned. Coming to the episode, my two biggest fears were: Rarity’s worst personality trait reemerges: her judgmentalism. Occasionally, sound bites of prejudice spew out of her mouth, most notably her racism towards Zecora in Bridle Gossip. Witnessing one of the most groundbreaking characters in the series showing a prejudice to bald ponies would seriously damage her rep. An unfortunate implication of the story belittling cancer patients. How would that be represented? Rarity or any pony treating somepony bald or becoming bald differently than folks with a full mane. Ponyville treating Rarity differently for losing her hair. Magically growing her mane back after melting down for losing it. The idea of baldness as the worst possible thing. Neither happens. Her mane grows back naturally a few months later. Rather than vanity or prejudice, self-confidence during the heat of a sudden crisis is Mane’s overarching theme. Rarity assumes ponies will treat those without (good) manes differently. Instead, no one insults, shuns, or intentionally shames her. Self-embarrassment by her destroyed locks causes her to cloud her own judgment and believe her own livelihood is a lie. After Twilight reassures her that her lost mane shouldn’t destroy her self-worth, Rarity takes what should be the worst-case scenario into the best. Until here, Rarity’s confidence was never tested, and this plot rounds her character more. Credit to @Jeric for helping me provide info for this section. Weaknesses: Clean Up on Aisle 19! Every episode can use a cleanup, and Mane ain’t no exception. The dialogue can use some better editing and more varied vocabulary. How many times does the episode use the word “mane”? Forty-one. That’s way too much! Dash herself said the word “awesome” thrice. Varying the word choice and cutting down the repetition will allow the dialogue flow a bit more. If you ask me which bothers me more, it’s Dash’s “awesome.” These days, that word has become a catchall identification for her, when she’s more than capable of using others. At least, multiple ponies rather than just one used “mane”. The script’s repetitive vocabulary also made the moral of shining from the inside out really heavy. Saying it once as Rarity changed into Punk Rarity is fine. But to do it twice more pushes it. Shake off the excess. The opener takes too long to establish some level of conflict. Usually a minute long, the theme song doesn’t play until three minutes in. For a 22-minute episode, that’s excessive and slow. The message can begin more effectively by either rearranging the song’s placement — perhaps after ordering the lavender bouquets — or trimming some of the runtime in the market. Mane-ly forgotten. After Pinkie accidentally applied Zecora’s shampoo on Pound and Pumpkin Cake, the episode focused the entire time on Rarity. No mention of her at any point until a few minutes before the end. Considering she was the catalyst for the conflict, her absence left a gap in the story and felt like she was re-inserted to tie it all up. Nevertheless… Nice ‘do. Conclusion: Well, well, well, what a pleasant surprise. Out of every episode in the second half, this one worried me the most. Prior to Daring Done? (the episode preceding Mane), I was looking forward to DD more. Why? Blame the synopses. That said, the actual story is something very different. I’m really surprised by how I enjoy Mane more, Mane is (in over quality) better than DD?, and none of my fears came true. In Haber’s first story since co-writing To Where and Back Again, he shows his FIM touch. Rarity has easily one of her best appearances in quite a while. The rest of the mane cast is also well done, especially Applejack. Zecora’s first speaking appearance since Re-Mark brings her to the familiar role, yet at the same time showed how she can’t solve all problems. No background or tertiary character is a jerk, reviving and sticking true to that refreshing (albeit familiar) welcoming atmosphere the show proudly presents itself in. A guideline of magic was both established and stuck to, providing Rarity (and the episode itself) the opportunity to twist the story’s formula. Mission accomplished!
  22. It Isn't the Mane Thing About You had Rarity cancel a big shoot with Photo Finish. And to do that, she said she would call her. That's what she told Fluttershy right before the Mane Six went to her place to lift her up. There's no other way to interpret what calling somebody is. You simply can't do that without a phone. I don't think Equestria has the technology sophisticated enough for ponies to walk around with cell phones, but at the very least, there should be landlines. And not once have we seen a pony use one anywhere in the show. They do have electricity. So what gives? Is this an oversight on the writers' part?
  23. Hey everypony! I didn’t see that this was already made but I’m wondering if anyone in my area, Orlando, FL, specifically near Disney, will be going to opening day of the movie? Where, when, if you’re dressing up (bounding or cosplay) and if you want to meet up! I’d love to meet up with fellow bronies and pegasisters and I’m thinking about dressing as Rarity or Celestia. Feel free to post your area to see if people will be near you to meet up as well!
  24. As should be VERY evident in this thread, the fandom artist community pretty much exploded after this episode Good evening everypony, and welcome back to another edition of "Batbrony Reviews"! First of all, apologies for getting this review out so late. Just been having trouble making time for it over the last few days on account of a whole lot of exciting real life stuff that's been happening. But that will be saved for another day, for now, onto the episode itself! Without further ado, this is "It Isn't the Mane Thing About You." So first things first, I just have to say that this was an odd duck of an episode. Like, not a bad one, far from it. In fact in execution this is a perfectly good episode, and in tone very much in the same vein as predecessors from Season 1 or Season 2 of the show. But that said, what did stand out to me as apparent was the fact that this was a Season 7 subject in an episode executed like a Season 1 or Season 2 episode, and that threw me for a bit of a loop. Unlike last week's episode, this is not so much a bad or disappointing thing as simply an odd thing to ponder. I cannot help but find myself asking "What if this episode had been executed differently?" and in fact will do just that at the end of the review. But for now, let's delve into what we got here. To start, Rarity kicks ass here, and I don't just say that because of the end. This was undoubtedly a Season 7 Rarity performance; while the character has never been completely self-obsessed or shallow I cannot help but think that if this episode had debuted in Season 1, she would have displayed far less grace or restraint in how she handled things than she did here. Instead, we got a Rarity who, while more than understandably upset at her predicament, did not come across as particularly shallow at any point; if anything, we actually readily understood how being unable to fix such a situation could truly devastate her without it feeling forced. Rarity doesn't just put a premium on maintaining good looks to make herself feel better, she does it to make an impression on ponies both in her own dealings as well as when she's lending a helping hoof to them, as evidenced by the opening scene of this episode where she's going around town lending assistance to various businesses and establishments. This does have a practical effect in that, well, without sounding too shallow, if there's one thing folks love more than practical-minded people, it's practical-minded people who look radiant. Politicians like John F. Kennedy, Ronald Reagan, Barack Obama, etc. all had good looks and distinct images, and this applies to business as well. A great example that comes to mind is who will folks always associate as the face of Apple, Jobs or Wozniak? Jobs of course, and not just because he was the better PR guy and knew how to connect to what customers wanted, but because eventually he developed a distinct image that, while not Hollywood-handsome, was its own kind of handsome within the Silicon Valley world. Point is, Rarity looking good isn't just something that she shallowly does to make herself feel better; at this point, it's simply a part of who she is and how she carries herself about, and there's nothing really wrong with that. She doesn't think she's better than other ponies because of it, she doesn't really even flaunt it, she just enjoys looking fabulous and using that part of herself to help others try to realize their own potential to be fabulous in their own ways. When you're just having one of "those" days This makes her reaction to losing most of her mane more than believable, even if some of her bits during her most panicky moments are hilarious. She doesn't just focus on getting it back (even if that is her top priority), she really does try to go about her business as well but just finds at first that she can't. She also doesn't blame Zecora or Pinkie Pie, and tries to have as much of a stiff upper lip as she can. Let's also consider that this isn't just something Rarity would freak out about; she may freak out more than most would, but evidently losing one's mane or tail is something that most ponies dread and understand magic can't fix easily, if at all. Even her sadness is, eventually, oddly subdued; normally we'd expect to see Rarity having a grand and fabulously over-the-top display of drama when she's especially feeling low, but here her lowest point is Rarity just... well, not being Rarity. She truly feels at that moment like she's not her true self, and can't even muster the ability to lament her current state as grandly as she normally would. That was a nice, subtle touch and Tabitha St. Germain's handling of the subdued, restrained Rarity in that moment was very effective. The ending of course was fantastic, and Rarity rocking the punk look all over town was as unexpected as it was delightful to watch, especially when she kept acting like herself again, it contrasted the punk image so wonderfully! And her learning to always believe that she was always fabulous no matter what she looked like, so long as she still behaved fabulously and channeled that into everything she did, was a great lesson for both herself as well as those who may be most affected by this episode, and a nice continuation of part of the lesson from Rarity's own legend of Mistmane which she recounted just a few episodes ago. So all in all, I really have no complaints about Rarity's performance here or how she was written; I still enjoyed her turn in "Campfire Tales" more personally, and for me that's still her highlight of the season, but this was a splendid turn for her all the same. Zecora coming back (in the first of back-to-back appearances, how about that!) was a welcome return, and unlike Daring Do's performance last week, Zecora's appearance here was not, thankfully, botched. I was honestly a little disappointed we didn't get to see her just shoot the shit some more with Pinkie Pie and Rarity when she started talking about manes and how tricky they are to handle with magic, but that was mostly because an unfortunate truth about Zecora is that she's usually there for the purpose of plot devices more than anything else. Most of what she says is either exposition about something that will be critical to the plot, or words of wisdom tied into the lesson learned. Make no mistake, I still enjoy her as a character and think she was used well here, but it is something I've noticed about her over time, and really it's a big reason we should see more of her, so that she's not just being used in such formulaic and predictable ways. Also, I can't help but think she should have taken a little bit more of the blame here for what happened to Rarity; she may not have gotten the bottles mixed up, but she is partially responsible in that she had no labels for two VERY different potions that look exactly the same. Overall, however, it was just nice seeing Ponyville's resident zebra once more, and I'm sure it'll be even better seeing her in this week's upcoming episode! Pinkie Pie, on the other hand, kind of annoyed me here. Her performance was nowhere near "MMMMystery on the Friendship Express" levels of bad or anything, but the best way I can put it is that they wrote her unnecessarily stupid here for the purposes of the plot. This is not the first time this has ever happened to Pinkie Pie as her over-the-top nature is often exploited by the show to create some kind of foil or plot device that gets everything else rolling, and many times it too has come off as lazy writing for this character. Pinkie may hardly be the brightest member of the Mane 6, but some of the shit she was doing in this episode seemed to be stuff that a five year old could figure out. Her spraying of that ridiculously sticky silly string EVERYWHERE in sight felt like something she'd impulsively do in a bad MLP fanfiction, not an actual episode; her repeated suggestion to simply use any cupcakes she salvaged from the silly string rather than bake new ones came off as both lazy and inconsiderate to the Cakes or their customers (even if it was a funny gag at certain points); and she seems to have spent at least an entire afternoon, if not one or multiple days even, simply trying to clean Sugarcube Corner up with the wrong potion, and you're telling me that in all of that time she never realized that this might be shampoo and not a magical cleaner??? All in all, hardly Pinkie's worst showing, but not exactly a flattering one either. She did, however, admittedly look rather adorable at the end of the episode after the shampoo debacle The rest of the Mane 6, on the other hand, were phenomenal, especially at the end. Twilight and Starlight (honorary fill-in for Spike here as far as I'm concerned) did admittedly get off to a bit of a rough start, mostly in that they, once again, couldn't resist messing with the laws of nature by trying to do something with their magic which, not a second before, they had said they shouldn't when they tried to assist Rarity with her mane through their magic. Now look, I get that they were just trying to be good friends, but (1) they've both made this mistake enough times with often near disastrous consequences that they should know better by this point, and (2) Twilight's first attempt in particular was a really shitty thing of her to do. They're trying to help their friend get her mane back, or some semblance of it, and what does she do? Why steal another pony's mane of course, much to that poor bucking crystal pony stallion's horror! I don't even get how the writers thought they could play this for laughs when they literally just gave this guy the same exact problem that Rarity was contending with the entire time, except I doubt he has a group of friends that includes a bucking Equestrian princess to help him try to get over such a dilemma. That'd be like doing a high school drama episode where, in order to help a friend who was anorexic, her friends tried somehow "passing" her anorexia onto someone else. Not a solid solution guys, not at all! At least the rest of their magical attempts weren't harmful to anyone else, and it was fantastic hearing them at least say no to attempting using time travel to fix things, but still, it was kind of ridiculous that those two made as many attempts as they did when they were so sure to start out that it wouldn't work. Besides that, however, Rarity's friends were great. Fluttershy, Rainbow Dash, and Applejack in particular tried their best to come through, first in trying to come up with whatever kind of wigs they could (in all honesty Applejack's was probably the most likely to work, even if Rainbow's looked the prettiest, but dear Lord Flutters I don't know why you thought Harry the Bear's green plant wig would work at all... even if it was hilarious and adorable seeing Harry working on it), and second in trying to bolster Rarity's spirits and help her regain her confidence to channel her inner fabulosity no matter what she looked like. Applejack in particular had some very personal lines of encouragement and support, a nice dose of Rarijack and reminder of how close those two in particular are in a season where we haven't seen a whole lot of it outside of this and one other episode. Probably her best line was when she hearkened back all the way to their very first adventure, reminding Rarity of when she did her first major act of generosity among her friends in giving up her tail to Steven Magnet; this was not only a critical element of Rarity's own nature to remind her of, but also highlighted how close these two are in showing how much of an impression this memory in particular must have left on Applejack. In the end, their support and friendship was exactly what Rarity needed in order to regain her confidence. Ponyville itself was very much alive in this episode, again in a way reminiscent of Seasons 1 and 2. The Flower Sisters, Roseluck, Daisy, and Lily, in particular had great showings and even showed shades of character growth; while they came close to panicking like they were so wont to do in early seasons, they ultimately kept their cool (with some assistance from Rarity) and did some smashing business with their flower sales while they were at it. They also treated Rarity the least different of any other business associates around Ponyville after her mane fiasco, simply unable to help her when they couldn't see her mane, which felt like a far more natural reaction than the other two. Speaking of which, fan pony salesman and Davenport, the owner of Quills and Sofas, were not nearly as charming. Fan pony store owner was relatively harmless, but he came off as a really inept business owner seeing as he was hurting his own business... simply because he had all of the fans in his store going at once, which made it hard for any pony to even enter his store. Pretty stupid move on his part, plus his later comments about "non-fabulous" ponies seemed a bit... superficial, at least how he delivered them. Davenport, however, was far worse in that he wasn't just stupid for not having wider variety in his sofas to start out, but was also a complete jackass! Dude made a business arrangement with Rarity, a very simple one at that; she gave him VERY sound business advice that helped him improve his sales, and in return all she wanted was a custom-made chaise lounge. Hell, as far as we know she was even going to pay for it in bits as well, so the fact that he was willing to break that agreement just for a few more bits is dickish beyond all belief. If I was Rarity, I wouldn't do business with a guy like that ever again! How can you really trust a guy like that in any type of business arrangement if he's willing to straight up break his word when it comes to his own business?! Aside from that, we had some fun appearances from Filthy Rich, Caramel (who may or may not now be a father of a filly via Sassaflash, who he was dating back in Season 2), Granny Smith and Grand Pear (who could be spotted in multiple scenes selling apple and pear products at a shared stand in the Ponyville Market), Apple Bloom conversing with Burnt Oak (again, another great bit of continuity from "The Perfect Pear," even if it would have been cooler seeing Big Mac talk to him), Big Mac and Sugar Belle taking a romantic walk at Sweet Apple Acres (something which I missed in my first viewing, though to be fair they showed it sooooooo briefly that it really is easy for anyone to miss), and Derpy at both the beginning and end, including rocking the ONLY one of the Rarity-inspired punk manes that looked as fabulous as hers did! Seeing so many different faces from Ponyville showing up in notable roles here was great, and something that is far too rare at this point in the show. Mannnnnnnn, the Flower Sisters are SO CUTE!!! As you can see, all of the elements we had in this episode easily add up to a good, perfectly likable episode. So you're probably wondering in what way I think it possibly could have been better? Well, odd as it may sound, I really do think this episode, by virtue of its subject alone, could have been far more daring if it wanted to. Allow me to explain. The elephant in the room with the subject of an episode like this is twofold. Rarity lost something which she believed is fundamental to achieving her own identity. Not in a superficial way (mostly), but this is a character who loves being fabulous and sharing that side of herself with others in any way she can, so it's easy to understand why this situation would be so personally distressful for her. Obviously, this episode can easily be relatable for two groups of people: (1) more generally speaking, anyone who has lost due to unfortunate circumstances something about themselves they consider to be a defining trait, or (2) more specifically, people who have lost their hair, especially due to a medical condition of some kind. That's a pretty heavy real world parallel for any MLP ep, and there's no way the writers weren't aware of it. So how could they have pushed the envelope just a bit more with this one? In just a few little ways, really. For starters, even though Rarity's mane eventually grew back, we didn't need to see that at the end of the episode; it needlessly minimized what she'd gone through, as well as the triumph of how she'd just rectified her situation as best as she could. Going even further, she didn't even necessarily need to fix her mane at all; as awesome as the punk mane was, I couldn't help but wonder (1) why it didn't occur to her to do that in the first place, and (2) how she had enough hair to do that? For her it was a wonderful fix, but in real world parallels, lots of people can't always do such a fun solution as Rarity did. Some may have no hair to spare at all (though of course wigs are always an option), and for others the lack of hair may even be the least of their problems. So what could have happened instead? Well, I say, what if the Mane 6 hadn't been able to really help Rarity? What if no one at first could, and she herself couldn't simply fix it by going with a different mane style? What if eventually, she came across somepony who in many ways had it even rougher than she did? This could either have been somepony with some kind of medical condition, or if the writers wanted to be less serious, a character like Derpy who has been the town klutz for years and has had to always live with that. In either case, she could have simply talked with this pony, asking in awe how they've managed to stay positive or their chipper selves despite their struggles and challenges in life. Their answer? They never let whatever bad conditions or circumstances they had in their lives define who they were. They always stay true to themselves and never, ever let any limitations they face keep them from remaining who they are, for their own sake as well as for the sake of those they love. Doing it doesn't mean it's easy, just worthwhile. Such an example would have been inspiring to somepony like Rarity, and led her to concluding the same thing she did in the episode as it is, simply in more dramatic fashion as the result of a far more serious experience. Now again, I must reiterate that this episode did not disappoint me. Executed as it was, it was a very good episode. But I still strongly believe that it could have been more if it wanted to be, and can't help but regret that we'll never get to see what it could have been if treated just a tad more seriously, even if what we got all around was good itself. That's all I've got for you everypony, until next time this is Batbrony signing off. I'm off!!! *cue dramatic exit* Let's close this thread with, what else, a shitload of Punk Rarity pics!!! I won't lie, if this had happened, it would have easily been the most metal thing ever!!!