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  1. Consider this a little belated gift for the Summer Sun Celebration. Princess Celestia's best appearance was Horse Play. For the first time, FIM had a quasi-legit Celestia episode, and she was written very well. Despite being a country ruler, she had no acting experience and really showed how much she sucked at it. But when the play was on the verge of collapse in "celestial" proportions, Celestia leads the Mane 8 into saving it and becoming a nationwide success. This episode is a marvelous exercise in how to make a godlike presence feel human. So, what about her second-best appearance? That goes to The Return of Harmony! Why not Crystal Empire, A Royal Problem, or Twilight's Kingdom? If you don't know my history, I ratted on her appearances in each of them, so no Debbie Downers for this blog. Okay, so why is this her best role pre-HP? Three big reasons. Rightful pass of the baton. One common criticism I know of this series is her (lack of) inclusion or sometimes exclusion in the two-parters, usually for really stupid in-'verse reasons. Twilight's Kingdom, The Crystal Empire, To Where, and the film took the brunt of it, and justifiably so. This isn't the case here. Discord was an old foe of both Celestia and Luna eons ago, but turned him to stone after they discovered and bonded with the Elements of Harmony. Still, powerful the two princesses are, they don't possess them anymore. Only their rightful heirs can harness their true power and restore harmony to Equestria once again, them being the Mane Six. The confusion is very evident on the Mane Six's faces, especially Twilight, as you see here: Her interrupted line echoes her expression: But the camera's panning of the stained glass window — PNG from here — explains why, along with Celestia's explanation: Even though this scene is rather expository, Celestia sets the tone. The EoH trust the M6 into wielding the Elements and using them to defend and protect harmony throughout the land. Twilight promises her they'll reuse them to beat Discord. Therefore, Celestia trusts them, too. Controlled anger. Pay attention to how Celestia behaves when Discord confronts them. Previous appearances showed Celestia as calm, cool, collected, and not afraid to pull a trick or two on others to maintain a loose atmosphere. For the first time, Celestia is the opposite: demanding, hostile, and very angry. All for the right reasons. Thanks to her and Luna's broken link from the Elements, her old foe was released into the modern Equestrian world and can't do it by herself. Discord understands this and uses the priceless artifacts and Celestia's anger to taunt her. With the Elements lost, he can do whatever he wants at his own disposal while maintaining his own integrity. Scenes like this demonstrate how dynamic Celestia not only is as a character, but can be, too. Up to this point, she had a lot of potential, and this back and forth shows us what the writers — Larson here — can do with her if you write the right plot. Also, notice three things during this scene. Despite being angry, she never loses her control. Age carried a whole load of wisdom for her. She knows his mind games and gets tested, but crossing the line by herself is exactly what he wants. As long as she remains calm, he can't really do anything with her. Twice, she extends her wings, once when she yells enough and once when she warns Discord after he toyed with the EoH. Emphasized a degree of majesty and warns Discord to take her and the new Bearers seriously. Before the camera pans to her face, Celestia paws the ground forty-five seconds aggressively into the video above. This shot is no accident. Rarely, a horse will forcefully drag their hoof across the ground to indicate anger, threatening to charge. Here, she warns Discord to not cross the line or hurt the Mane Six, or else. But since they each know she's no threat to him, that's really all she can do. Help from afar. Discord's powers are so great that they influenced her friends and brainwashed them into their polar opposites. Even though she retained her optimism and hope they'll return to normal, their lack of cooperation over her the reference guide made her frustrated and angry, causing a nasty brawl and effectively ending their friendships between each other. Dash's lack of presence (foreshadowed by Celestia's backstory early in Part 1) caused the Elements to backfire and result in Twilight believing that perhaps the Magic of Friendship truly isn't enough. Finally, she couldn't take any more manipulation, discolored, and decided to leave everyone but Spike behind. But who didn't? Celestia. At Twilight's lowest moment, she knew it still wasn't too late to help her or her friends. By returning her friendship lessons to her, she reminds her of her growth since first moving to Ponyville. Every friendship lesson she learned was important, and Celestia won't let her forget it. As Twilight recited them, the Twilight of old recovered, and no longer was she Twilight Quitter anymore. This scene here reinforces RoH's main moral: The Return of Harmony was the most perilous situation the M6 ever experienced. But Elements or no Elements, Celestia knew how to help tell Twilight from afar how important her friendships with the RM5 are. All without telling her, too. But this moment also enforced a secondary moral, which is just as powerful: Almost seven years after RoH first aired, it still rings so true in the old library, don't you think? Conclusion. Despite writing Twilight as the lead, Larson maintains the importance of their whole friendship. All six matter, and he writes the episode as if they matter. Secondly, Princess Celestia had her best role of the series that wouldn't be usurped until Horse Play. Depending on how she's written, she can be a major force to be reckoned with in the story and have a tremendous impact on the conflict and resolution. Despite appearing in Part 1 and briefly to conclude Part 2, she maintains her presence at the most critical times and was there to help Twilight when she was about to quit. Both parts of The Return of Harmony respectively premiered on September 17 and 24, 2011, and Larson's strokes of genius age brilliantly.
  2. Dalkrin-the-Wanderer

    Deconstructing Cutie Marks

    Cutie Marks are an important aspect of the show. They serve as a shorthand to help us immediately understand core aspects of a pony's personality or role, even if they are not given a speaking part in the story. They are often the most recognizable part of a character, to such an extent that when we see a familiar mark on an unfamiliar pony, we tend to take notice. Obviously this is a failing of the medium and not meant to be taken as significant but as a nerd and a Brony, I take it upon myself to be overly analytical of my perky pastel ponies and their society. While it's clear that very little thought was put into the overarching principals of Cutie Mark design by Lauren when she was Show Runner, I expect that some system can be established that can give a general overview of a pony simply by interpreting their cutie mark. I've been met with limited success in this venture so far in my post here but I feel like I'm missing some key aspects. So far, I have accounted for some basic elements of the Cutie Mark, namely the symbols and their position relative to one another but there is more I could use here. ultimately, I want to distribute this system to the four corners of the internet so that content creators can use it to create deep and complex characters with consistency, and to help stem the tides of the dreaded Mary Sues that plague our fan fiction. I intended to begin establishing meanings for Layouts, Color choice and contrast, Imagery and the circumstance in which the mark was earned. All of these things will help creators to home in on their Pony's personality. That said, I can't just make these things up willy nilly and expect them to work. I'll need to set up a database of cutie marks, both cannon an original to create datapoints which I can account for. Obviously some things will simply defy my attempts but I'm still game to try. I hope to conclude this project with an intuitive system that anyone can use. For your perusal, I offer an example of the kinds of things that this system could reveal about a character. I give you Shining Armor! His Cutie Mark is a Dark Blue Heraldic shield with a pink Six-Pointed Star nested inside. This star is Echoed from his sister, Twilight Sparkle. Above the Shield is a Triune of powder blue Five-Pointed Stars which are inherited from his mother, Twilight Velvet. A Shield is a clear indicator of protection and with the Six Pointed star Nested inside, this meaning is reinforced. The six-pointed star has a double meaning in this case as it is simultaneously a strong indicator of Magical talent and Mirrored by his younger sister which indicates her as very important to his talent in some way. The Triune of Five-Pointed stars would normally indicate some interest in astronomy, in this case, since they are Inherited from his mother, their Triune arrangement reinforces a strong affection for her. Taken as a whole, Shining armor appears to be a pony with a strong talent in magical protection who is very protective of his sister and loves his mother dearly. This system is still a work in progress and I hope to have more information to add to it soon! I'll keep you posted!
  3. This is an example of the thought process one can use to reach a conclusion with knowledge we already have, but did not think to consider. It just takes some time and patience. If the brain can store massive quantities of data, why do most people not consciously recall it all? Its because people do not try. All you need is spare time, and recognition of an almost order of operations of logic. In this example I start by asking a question that most would think has no definite objective answer. Then I keep going through a self-critical process of proposals based on reflections and the knowledge it brings to the foreground that I already had but did not know I had. So to simplify. 1. 'unknowable' question 2. reflection 2.a knowledge from reflection 2.b applying the knowledge into the equation 2.c rule it out if it doesn't objectively answer anything 3. repeat 2 til it does objectively answer something 4. add this into the equation permanently 5 repeat 2-5 as needed til the first question is answerable. 6. The answer and its objectively true within the assumptions that 'the world is real'.
  4. My Name Is Sunset Shimmer

    Underused characters

    Hi! Sunset shimmer here~ today id like to talk about characters who go underused or are never used (ie moon dancer or characters who are used for a episode plot or never appear again except for cameos There are characters who go unused in the show and unlike Background ponies they get forgotten about:( some of the characters do get reused once or twice yet there's potential to keep them around for many episodes (ie daring do) in the case of moondancer there could of been a plot where moondancer sticks around with twi or help her in finding important books or being another student for twi too teach. Just a thought That's about it Thanks for reading! Sunset shimmer out~
  5. Feedback on how I could improve would really help!
  6. It's amazing how as an adult you can look at animated movies and really wring out all the great lessons and characterizations in the movie itself. The MLP Movie was certainly no exception. Perhaps a few of the greatest examples I can pull from the movie are Tempest's painful past playing a role with her current role as the Storm King's sidekick Twilight's desperation interfering with her friends Not forgetting who you are and what you're made to do Let's go over the first. So...in the movie when we first see Tempest, we see the familiar villain archetype: wanting surrender, wanting power and wanting to complete tasks for selfish gain. We get a hint of something due to Tempest's broken horn. Fast forward to Tempest's Song "Open Your Eyes", and this is where we learn the full story of what happened to Tempest. The pain of losing her horn caused her to become bitter and angry, because her horn was what made her so special. She loved to create beautiful sky displays...but all of that was taken away from her due to the Ursa Minor slicing off her horn. Even when Twilight saved her, she still felt remorse and sadness. She could not see herself as "complete" without her horn. Nonetheless, as the movie conveyed, "You are still you, perfect and beautiful, no matter what happens or what you look like." The next deep point was Twilight's desperation in wanting to save Ponyville over her friendship. This scene was honestly very hard to watch. After a delightful and joyous song "One Small Thing" by the Mane 5 and Princess Sky Star, it was discovered Twilight was trying to steal the pearl. This costs the Mane 6 their new seapony transformation and a banishment from Seaquestria. Twilight and Pinkie get into an argument, which results in Twilight stating she doesn't need her friends, paraphrasing. This was the big moment where Twilight realized she had become too desperate in the need of an item to save Ponyville and Canterlot, and completely forgot about the worth of her friends. This was where Tempest wanted Twilight, alone and with no one to defend her. This is perhaps the hardest lesson to swallow in the whole movie, because it teaches that you can't rely on physical objects to help you complete a task. In the end, it's the people/ponies/friends that matter the most that will help guide you through whatever you need. The last deep point I bring forth is one that has been repeated in countless movies, one of the first being "The Lion King", "Remember who you are". Returning to that hard scene where Twilight was desperate to save Ponyville, she forgot who she was. She forgot that she was the Princess of Friendship, and in that one scene where she confronted Tempest in that small cell, she said "Friendship didn't fail me...I failed friendship.". Friendship is an abstract idea. It is what brings us together. And in this world today, with all of this hate and stuff that's going around, we can easily get swept away in the vortex and forget who we really are, and in that moment, friendships can disappear with a poof. But alas, this quote has another meaning. Remember the pirates that the Mane 6 met who were supposedly henchmen of the Storm King? Remember how Rainbow Dash reminded them who they were and what they were meant to do with that one song "Time To Be Awesome?" Well, the same principle applies here. You can't let anyone steal your mojo and your charisma. That all belongs to you. To conclude, looking at the MLP Movie from an adult perspective really made me think about my journey through life thus far. It made me ask a lot of questions...such as: Do I know who I really am? Are my "friendships" really true and honest? Am I dwelling in past events too long? Has the past influenced my emotions? Am I letting people take advantage of me and making me forget who I am? Am I blaming other people for my wrongdoings when I am too desperate to complete a certain task? There are a lot more questions out there. In the end, looking at the MLP Movie from an older perspective can really help you evaluate yourself from all points and make you think about what has been successful, and what you need to work on, so you can become the best you can.
  7. I guess we all remember what Twilight Sparkle once said, "All the ponies in this town are CRAZY!" I can see why she might think that. Is she actually right though? Yes, most of the ponies she met are kind of strange, but is there something more to that? Yes, My Little Pony is a children's TV show, but i like to believe that alot of the character, show symptoms of serious mental disorder. It is actually very obvious if you look at it in a certain way. Are the ponies indeed have some form mental illnesses? Let's find out Ironically, the pony we know most about her psych is the same pony that declares the others crazy -- Twilight Sparkle. Her character throughout the first season and into the second was one that was relatively reclusive, untrusting, and bookish. She felt a huge obligation towards getting things done right, and getting them done on time. These are all symptoms of Avoidant Personality Disorder, a mental imbalance characterized by actively avoiding social contact, out of fear of being ridiculed. People (or in this case, ponies) with AvPD aren't afraid of social interaction, per say; they simply believe they're any good at it, and would just make things bad on themselves and others. They do however generally strive for a social life, which it is shown that Twilight did in fact wish for at the end of the season 1 opener. Victims of AvPD use fantasy or unorthodox habits as a form of escapism, which Twilight exhibits frequently with her profound love for reading and her not-so-slight OCD. Though they are withdrawn, they read a lot into body language and intonation, more often than not coming to a pessimistic conclusion. At first glance, you wouldn't believe Twilight to exhibit this, but she shows it blatantly in Lesson Zero, where she fears that Princess Celestia -- arguably the only pony Twilight trusts completely aside from her brother -- would send her back to Magic Kindergarten. Therefore, it can be concluded that Twilight had been slightly traumatized during her years in Kindergarten, likely the result of bullying and ridicule. Fluttershy as well shows a fear of social interaction; hers, however, manifests in a rather severe case of what is called Social Anxiety Disorder, or social phobia. Many people assume AvPD and SAD to be one in the same; however there are many specific differences between the two, the main one being that social phobia is an actual fear of social interaction, whereas AvPD is simply an avoidance. The main symptoms of social phobia is a pervasive and consistent fear of talking to, being talked to, or otherwise interacting with a person or persons. There is also a withdrawal from society, sometimes even to the point of hermitry. All of these, Fluttershy has exhibited on more than one occasion (though significantly less in season three). There are also several physical symptoms associated with social phobia, such as blushing, nausea, and stammering -- all of which Fluttershy has at one point or another shown, stammering being extremely prevalent. Panic attacks may also be present; and indeed, Fluttershy has a panic attack when Rainbow Dash pushes her to show how fast she can fly in front of hundreds of other pegasi. It is shown in her cutie mark flashback that she had been bullied throughout her school life, which is one of the more common causes of social phobia. Rainbow Dash's pushy nature might also be a contributing factor, but her loyalty and companionship is one that Fluttershy considers indisposable. In this, she seems to exhibit several symptoms of Dependent Personality Disorder as well. This is reinforced by the fact that comorbidity between Social Anxiety and DPD is relatively common. The pony that is more often than not considered the craziest is of course Pinkie Pie, the perplexing pretty pink party pony. Her bubbly, energetic personality is a classic case of vivacious subtype of Histrionic Personality Disorder. People with HPD are defined as impulsive, hyperactive, and have a notably low tolerance for negative emotions, even ones not necessarily aimed towards them. Her element, Laughter, is pretty much a light-up sign indicating her intolerance for negative emotions. Victims of HPD have a deep-seeded craving for attention as well, which Pinkie shows rather blatantly in Party Of One. Her spontaneous party throwing can be considered a manifestation of her subconscious need for attention, which is reinforced by her persistance in trying to befriend Cranky Doodle (even to the point of breaking into his house). A possible cause of her mental deficiency is familial abuse. Having grown up on a rock farm and working day-in and day-out as a mere child undoubtedly poses severe mental health problems. The dysfunction termed Hypomania is characterized by a larger-than-life self-image, racing thoughts, and dangerous activity -- all of which can be used to describe one Rainbow Dash, arguably the loudest and most self-possessed pony in Ponyville. A major indicator for hypomania is what is called psychomotor agitation, a reflexive need to move. This is often characterized by restlessness when sitting still, pacing, or biting lips. In Rainbow Dash's case, hovering or extending and retracting her wings are strong indicators of psychomotor agitation. She also exhibits extremely dangerous activity on a daily basis, pushing herself to the brink of her ability to perform death-defying tricks and one day ultimately join the Wonderbolts, a famous team of expert stunt pegasi. Rainbow has a major egocentric personality, continually places herself higher on the pedestal than others; however, she wouldn't hesitate to help her close friends, even to the point of her giving up her dreams in order to help them in a time of need. This lends to the opinion that her hypomania is in no way destructive, except for her edge-of-the-seat lifestyle, and in fact has a positive effect on her and the people surrounding her. Applejack is a hard character to describe, much less diagnose. She's a hard-worker who hates handing the reigns over to anyone else, she never censors herself, and loves to help others who are in need. In this, she seems rather sane, but if you squint really hard you can see that she seems to exhibit several characteristics of Self-defeating Personality Disorder (aka Masochistic Personality Disorder). She deliberately puts herself in harms way throughout the series: Applebuck Season, where she decides to harvest the entire apple orchard by herself; The Last Roundup, where she moves out of town to get a better paying job so as to raise money and fix town hall; and Spike At Your Service, where she saves Spike not only from a pack of hungry timberwolves, but also a giant timberwolf at the end of the episode. She even went so far as to walk all the way around a mountain with another pony on her back, simply because said pony was too scared to climb it herself. This show of altruism definitely points towards a virtuous form of MPD, but she shows a complete lack of the feelings of deserved gratitude. This loans to somewhat oppresive tendencies, since she expresses genuine feelings towards everyone and everything (she is the element of Honesty, afterall), even if those feelings are negative. However, she doesn't have the self-pitiable nature that commonly accompanies the oppresive subtype; this could possibly be due to her altruistic tendencies. The final character we are going to go over is the element of Generosity, Rarity. She, like Applejack, is more than willing to sacrifice her time, money, body parts, etc., on other people without hesitation. Unlike Applejack, however, she is willing to gloss over unsavory comments, instead favoring to soften the blow. She has a tendency to overreact to situations and she is a professional "whiner". On several occasions she's shown to place other people before her lifelong dreams, notably in Green Isn't Your Color, where she would rather help Fluttershy become supermodel than for Rarity to become a world-famous fashion designer. She appears to exhibit characters not unlike the appeasing subtype of Histrionic Personality Disorder. Whereas Pinkie Pie's vivacious HPD focused more on being hyperactive and neurotic, Rarity's appeasing HPD focuses more on brushing away bad emotions, instead focusing on giving unto others and making them happy, as a way to avoid dealing with her own problems. The main difference between appeasing HPD and virtuous Masochistic Personality Disorder -- which we went over with Applejack -- is that there is no feelings of deservation with HPD, and there is no repressing of emotions with MPD. Self-sacrifice is a hugely defining symptom of appeaseful HPD, and Rarity's entire being is dedicated to such. This might seem like nothing but a benefit to others, however it can be extremely detrimental to the victim of the illness. Repressed emotions can cause serious health risks, and given the selfless nature of those exhibiting it, the risks might go unheeded. I think it is safe to assume that Twilight was right in her statement that all the ponies were indeed, "crazy". But we attach too many negative connotations to that word; a more accurate word -- and one that would sound less negative -- would be "disturbed". This is a very unique show, in more ways than one. We've had The Big Lebowski ponified, we've had government conspiracies, we've had international espionage -- If you ask me, it's not too surprising that we also have mental deficiencies.
  8. Note: Credit goes to @ChB, @King Clark, @AlexanderThrond, @Jeric, WaterPulse, and Razgriz for this review. FIM (and by extension, bronydom) is close to seven years old. Over the years, the characters grew into lovable role models and inspirations. Each has their own reasons for watching, loving, and sticking with the show. Through thick and thin, FIM's overcome turbulent times, yet succeeded. How long it'll last is to be determined. By extension, the brony fandom grew, underwent a whole bunch of drama, and grew some more. While Slice of Life was a love letter to the fanbase, Fame and Misfortune takes their own frustrations and responds in a really lazy, broken way. It's the Rainbow Falls of Season 7. Strengths: Glimhorse = Awesomehorse! All season, Starlight's been the best-written Mane character. In every episode she's been in, her roles make sense. She continues to grow into her own and is more and more one of the Mane cast. Even when the episode isn't as good as it should be, she's usually the best part. This episode is her best post-reformed appearance. Everything about her role fits perfectly. While the RM6 wrote in the journal, she was absent and had no knowledge about it. So the journal is new to her, and she can look at what's going on with a fresh mind. Simultaneously, she's treated like an actual, genuine part of the gang, not an ancillary member that the writers can plug in when the episode calls for it. Her best moments occur in two places: At the restaurant after Rarity ran away wailing after two patrons denigrated her behind her back. She took Rarity's reaction and what they said about her really hard. The chilling part is her bitter tone as she replied to Twilight: Combine that with her nasty glare, it's perhaps the angriest the audience has seen her. As Twilight went off to Sweet Apple Acres with AJ, she stayed behind. Her mannerisms and worried expressions show how much Rarity means to her and doesn't want her to get hurt. Moments like these implicate to the audience how much she values her as a friend. When I first began writing this review, I read a comment offsite accusing her of acting like a Deus Ex Machina, a criticism that makes no sense at all. If she's like one here, then she wouldn't be established until the climax or resolution and pops open an idea that wasn't established at any point in the series. Starlight was an important secondary character since the opener and had a major impact in all four acts. Just before she temporarily departed in Act 3, she told the ReMane 6 (and by extension, us) that she'll be back with something important. Coconut Cream & Toola Roola. These two fillies, based on their G3/G3.5 depictions under the same names, are good characters. What makes them strong is, yes, they argue petulantly, but they argue like children. When Twilight stops them, she shows them an important moral to learn from and decide to try. Even with the little screentime, they grow in each successive appearance. Whether they'll appear or not anytime soon I don't know. Personally, I hope they do. This may depend on the VAs (who are kids) themselves. Strong melody. The melody for We're a Work in Progress is really good. It's positive, uplifting, and inspirational. All the qualities that help hone the welcoming backdrop and make FIM's world so endearing. Weaknesses: Handwaved continuity. There are at least four continuity errors, two of them major. Like my RF review, instead of a brief summary, here's a fuller list: They learned that lesson from Return of Harmony. The season 2 premiere. The journal didn't debut until season four. Unless they stated to add them in later (which they didn't directly), it should be only S4 lessons, not a mesh of all four together. The fact that everyone suddenly wanted to know about what they learned. Once they published it, they became popular and unpopular. Why does this not make sense from a continuity perspective? Ever since they defeated Nightmare Moon, Ponyville and Canterlot revered them as celebrities. Sure, other episodes within the earlier seasons had this type of occurrence before, ala 'Shy from Green Isn't Your Color. But Green is from season one, when the characters and world still grew. At the time, it was mostly Canterlot, Ponyville, and the Everfree Forest, So the writers could get away with that. Nowadays, the Forest has no more plot utilization, and the world has expanded beyond not just Ponyville and Canterlot, but Equestria altogether. In RoH, Celestia rewarded their victory with a celebration and stained-glass window. They saved The Crystal Empire from Sombra. Twilight became a princess. After defeating Tirek and saving all of Equestria, they and Spike became responsible for spreading the Magic of Friendship across the world. You get the point. If this was a early-season episode (seasons one through two), then their sudden popularity would be believable. This is season seven. They're international celebrities. If they were interested in the journal and lessons, they would've done so long ago. Particularly the ponies from Ponyville. More about this later. The CMCs' sudden popularity makes no sense, either. They dipped into popularity contests twice (Confidential, Twilight Time). In Flight to the Finish, they were awarded the spot representing Ponyville for the opening ceremony. After Lost Mark, they became permanent celebrities and are sought for advice whenever they wonder where to either find their Mark or reconnect with it. Hell, they remark about their history of success during Forever Filly: So, why would they suddenly become really popular again now? And why would they conveniently skip over Twilight Time's lesson, which SB wrote in that same journal? In the Equestrian world, Daring Do is nothing but a figment of A.K. Yearling's and the Daring fandom's imagination. The RM6 know she's real, yet they respect Daring's/A.K.'s boundaries. She wants nothing but to be remembered as a quality children's storybook series. The entire Daring Do con is commemorated specifically for Daring the character, her world, and overall cast. The ending of both Don't and Stranger imply they (both the ReMane Six and Quibble) keep her identity and privacy a secret. But the RM6 out her in their journal. Not one of the seven, especially Dash nor Twilight, pause for one second to reconsider the consequences of unsolicitedly revealing Daring's secret identity — how big it'll be in the Daring fandom after reading something that should never have been revealed. They just go, "Screw common sense!! We'll publish it, anyway!" The continuity error's even worse when Dash directly references Don't after SG magically published several clean, refurbished copies. Dialogue, you disappoint me. A good chunk of the story's believability lowers considerably when the dialogue is often forced, and that's what happens here. Even though the RM7 and CMCs act in character and the two new fillies are portrayed like kids, sometimes the lines are mechanical, turning fully-dimensional and relatable characters into robots. It happened in many episodes prior, including Rainbow Falls, Trade Ya, Newbie Dash, and Buckball Season. Same thing here. Starlight, Toola, and Coconut spoke the most natural here. The most annoying points come after they remind the audience of the lessons they learned and, in particular, after Rarity ran off: Thanks, Twilight, for reminding us everything we all just saw seconds before. And loud enough so the snobby couple a few feet away could hear (yet didn't react due to plot contrivance). It gets worse when the ponies exposit, and there's a lot of it here. What's the golden principle in entertainment? Show, don't tell. In "children's" entertainment, even more crucial. By expositing so much, much of the seriousness and humor are sucked out, leaving behind an arid story. The tone will be mentioned later. But a repeated flaw in this show (and episode in general) isn't: A Whole Cruel World. The entire setting is really, really cruel. One or two days ago, the Mane Eight were among Equestria's biggest celebrities. Once they published the journals, they became pariahs. A group of leaders that (in the townsfolk's POV) deserve nothing except abuse. Wherever the script went, the RM6 felt miserable. And the more Twilight witnessed their pain, the more and more pain she felt, too. And how did all of Ponyville (or Canterlot) react? Selfishly. Rarity (the diner): Two background ponies talked shit behind her back. Neither of them clearly understand anything what the journals were supposed to say and went off on nothing except baseless assumptions. After she ran away, they feel oh so proud of themselves and pretend like it's no big deal. Not even Starlight's scolding through their thick heads worked. It's really unclear what they're supposed to portray. Is it supposed to be a jab at people for criticizing the writing within the episodes, missing the point in an episode, or hating Rarity's character? Any of the above, all, or none? Whatever the case is, it fails for five reasons. The lack of clarity already explained. The "stuck-up rich bitch" stereotype is enforced. Rarity underwent major trials that completely transformed her as a character. We as an audience saw that ride…but all they read is the result. To echo @Jeric in a chat with me, both RTM and Simple Ways showed her at really low lows. When all they read is how shitty you behaved, then they may have an awful impression of you regardless of outcome. Daisy, a well-known background pony from season one with a sweet (yet overly-dramatic) personality, bashed Rarity. For her to act like a snob is very out of character of her! The newspaper. Observe the 1.5/5 score in the shot linked above. The pony who read it really disliked it, and the couple's dissing only piled everything on. That one shot further muddles the point. Pinkie: It's one thing if they're tourists meeting Pinkie for the first time and wanting to get acquainted with her. All five — Carrot Top, Cherry Berry, Sassaflash, Berry Punch, and Coco Crusoe — are long-established background ponies dating back to season one. We've seen them help each other out so everyone's lives improve. They were seen at one point or another during The Smile Song; all but Coco and Sassaflash not only have very dedicated fanbases, but also actively followed, smiled, sang, and danced with her. Pinkie's presence was more than enough to make them all happy. Glad you said this, Pinkie, 'cause that doesn't make this scene okay! In fact, it makes it worse. Them knowing her for years and suddenly laugh AT her like complete jackasses does nothing but implicate that their happiness before and after Pinkie brightened their days is a façade. In fact, hold that quote. Dash: Bratty pegasi continue to pressure Dash and refuse to leave her alone. It's one thing if they truly were eager to hear more about her stories and adventures. It's another to rip out Twilight's lessons gleefully, pretend Twilight isn't even there, and act all smug about it. Dash wasn't happy with how poorly they treated her friend, but was forced to put up with it, since her "fanclub" is too stubborn to listen. Fluttershy: Several big problems: Like every other pony before them, all four adults are assholes. Or to be accurate, worse than just assholes. They're abusive, gang up on Fluttershy, and then put up a shoddy, lazy excuse just to be awful people. "Entitled to know"? "Why can't I be in the book"?! ARE YOU FUCKING SERIOUS?! There's NO excuse to gang up on her, period! One of the ponies here is Lemon Chiffon, who debuted in Mare Do Well. Previously, she had two hearts as her cutie mark. Here, a half-full glass of water mark along with a snooty, "masculine-sounding" voice. She resembles a lot like Lily Peet, a MTF brony "pundit" with a history of bashing bronies. I don't know or care if she laughed from that or not. If it's intentional, that's a line you never cross. Why? When you parody specific fans, it comes off as tacky at best and self-indulgent at worst. It tells the audience you have a very hostile opinion on not only specific members of your audience, but also the people you're trying to reach out to. Personally, if I'm parodied like this, I'd be really offended, because I'm treated like a caricature rather than a real person. If it's unintentional, then while the line ain't crossed, her attitude, voice, and mark are supposed to mock the "entitled fan" stereotype when FS stands up to them, three qualities Chiffon can't control. Sometimes intent doesn't equate result, yet the possible transphobic implications remain. This "gang" resembles PYHD's market scene, one of the worst of the series. Unlike the former, all of them debuted previously. These four characters and their so-called "personalities" are designed for this episode only. Good chance some or all of them will either never make an important appearance again or (hopefully) change to a more likeable personality. @AlexanderThrond brought up a great point in his review, and I'll expand on that. Fluttershy is used as a vessel to respond to the "criticism" (read: abuse in the episode's context) of their struggle to develop her, completely contradicting their intentions several seasons ago. From Luna Eclipsed until right around Rainbow Falls, her character stagnated, and her shyness was often reduced to comic relief. It looks even worse following an episode where she learns a very valuable lesson. When you flanderize a character like her after she underwent significant development in season one, you reduce her from three-dimensional to one-dimensional. Any long-time brony understands how this valid criticism of her didn't come out of thin air. During season four, DHX attempted to write better stories surrounding her, even when they aren't quite up to snuff: Bats!, Breezies, and Filli Vanilli. The following season, that criticism blossomed, and the flanderized Fluttershy has been absent ever since. The one episode showing Scaredyshy in S5 wasn't written as a daft joke: It expands a pointless scene from LE and explains why she hated Nightmare Night so much: She hates being pranked, and NMN without the pranks isn't fun. Without reading the valid criticisms, understanding them, and putting forth solid effort to fix this flaw, the Fluttershy we see today won't exist. Season five was great for her. Seasons six and seven are her best to date. It conveniently ignores It Ain't Easy Being Breezies. She had to assert herself through a very difficult action that she hated to make: kick out the breezies so they can continue their journey home. In her journal entry, she marks down how she had to learn that tough message. It's her very last journal entry that we witnessed, and it'd make sense if it were her last one in the journal, too. Not one time is it referenced, and it's ignored in order to continue using that journal as a forced plot device to dissuade. To handwave one of the most important episodes and subsequent lessons in her entire saga just to drive a point home makes the meta reference and payoff very deceitful. Rarity (boutique): The context behind the jump scare pile onto the torture. But why would Lemon Hearts (one of Twilight's friends from Canterlot) even be a part of the anti-Rarity hate mob in the first place? She'd know how much Rarity (and the rest of her friends back in Ponyville) mean to her, and she'd respect that. If she got upset, chances are she'd write or talk to Twilight. Applejack: No, they didn't bash her, pretend she didn't exist, laugh at her, or gang up on her. These are huge AJ fans. They're still assholes. Every single one of them show up at Sweet Apple Acres unannounced, immediately declare themselves to be part of her family without any consent, and force them to accommodate them, whether they like it or not. Big Mac, AJ, AB, and Granny not only moped as they slaved away for trespassers, but were actively distressed. Obviously, they want nothing to do with them, yet can't do anything about it since they're so outnumbered by this mob. All of them are terrible, but since she's my favorite character, the FS scene is my least-favorite. Oh, and Twilight? She's her own section. "Comedy." What this show does well often is the comedy. The jokes, timing, and corresponding tone can really make an episode funny. But when the jokes make no sense, forget it. The jokes suck for varying reasons, ranging from missing the point to the story's tone to hypocrisy of the meta "humor." The biggest offenses are the following (in airing order): Fluttershy writing her journal entry minuscule and nervously using the excuse of leaving room for others. This joke is very vague. Is it to reference her Timidshy past, or something? The mashed, rotten apple used to indicate AJ's lesson. Why the hell would she even smash an apple in there to begin with? She may not be the tidiest pony, but c'mon, man. Lemon Chiffon's voice and attitude so the audience can laugh at the "entitled fan" stereotype from all four who brigaded FS. This jump scare: By far the worst joke in the episode and second-worst grossout face of the season to this: If it's a jump scare, it's supposed to be a surprise. Rarity has a history of exaggerated faces, and both Twilight's and Starlight's distress/grimaces clue the audience that they'll hate what they'll see from her. Credit to @ChB for pointing this out. It takes up a good amount of the frame, and is drawn in exaggerated detail. The slowly-dripping mascara and level of intricacy for her mouth are no accident. It's done to be disgusting. The context surrounding it. The couple bashing her behind her back, reading the bad review in the newspaper as they dissed her, and Canterlot boycotting her in front of her boutique took a toll. Of the six who were tortured, Rarity had it the most devastated reaction. The entire scene with AJ is supposed to be a meta reference to her lack of popularity in the fandom and how little she appears in merch compared to the others. Unfortunately, what's supposed to be a gold mine for excellent meta jokes (including parodying the short end of the stick she received by the showrunners since Mane Attraction) is turned into a major missed opportunity. Just about every character who invaded SAA is established as far back as S1, including Cherry Berry (again) and Dinky Doo. This scene reinforces one of the episode's fatal flaws: the sudden treatment of the RM6 as celebrities. Context is key. If this was the first or early joke in order and rewritten a bit to make it seem like it's tens and eventually hundreds of happy tourists from abroad flocking in line at the entrance to meet her, then it's possible to make it work. Instead, every pony other than a specific few leading up to this scene live in town and trespass because of plot convenience. These ponies reinforce that context. AJ's statement of not liking the newfound popularity understates the chaos from SAA and their insufferable behavior. That line (and who it represents) is an imbecilic straw man. People complained about Twilight in season 4, because her characterization was boring, and rising her into princesshood put her on a much higher pedestal compared to the rest. Turning her into a princess means she takes part in ruling the kingdom and making sure none of her actions hurt Equestria. The Twilight of old appeared in Castle Mane-ia, yet what made her so lovable and her status played hooky until Twilight Time. Later episodes, Twilight's castle forming a round table (thus equalizing the Mane Six and Spike), and season five since rectified that, and the criticism has since dwindled considerably. So, how many jokes were successful? Two. Pinkie's party favors popping out of the journal once Dash opened her journal page. Twilight's face becoming flat as a pancake after AJ accidentally smashed her into the wall. Her exaggerated scowl and glare made it funny. Best joke of F&M. *closes "Twilight"* Even though this is an ensemble episode, Twilight receives the most focus. Each time she witnesses a caricature of fans attack/stalk her friends or is completely ignored herself, Twilight's confidence gets beaten down more and more. Like the others, she's tortured by the townsponies just to create a payoff (whether it's the punchline to a joke or otherwise), but the torture pornography helps ruin it, among other things. "Among other things" being the littler details. Recall how I called the dialogue a flaw: There's more to this problem generally. On two specific instances, the dialogue helped ruin the story. Here, Twilight both affirms and doubles down on an absolute viewpoint of what the journal and results should be: If you don't take the friendship lessons to heart, you're not to be listened to, even if you enjoy it. There's no homogenous way to enjoy a product. If there are ponies out there who enjoy the journal, but isn't fully invested in absorbing the lesson, so what? There's no one right way to enjoy it. I'll return to this point soon. … … … Where do I even start with this shit? F&M is FIM's third meta episode of the series. Only this time, the characters are portrayed as the showrunners' avatar, and those who are abusing the ReMane Seven represent the fans they're retorting. It's self-referential and doesn't hide it. When we as an audience criticize the Mane Eight, we don't usually do so because we hate the characters or expect the worst. We criticize because we know that this show is very good and has done great, yet can do better. As an audience, we relate to them in some way or another. It can be a mane pony, secondary, or background. Everyone has a preference of who they like and dislike. Nobody looks at a character exactly the same way. Guess what? That's okay. At the end of the day, we still love the characters as a whole and appreciate the show and staff for what they do. This "parody" is completely inaccurate in message, conflict, and theme. This exchange is the worst dialogue in the entire episode and causes the whole conflict to fall apart. They're characters, not real people. They exist only on screen, on paper, or within our own imaginations. It's the creators' job to flesh them out and make that character become high-quality and memorable. Neither the avatars nor antagonists are real. But in the universe, the characters ARE real and conquer major trials. Each time they wrote in the journal, they changed for the better, even after the episode sometimes doesn't work. Fluttershy after Breezies, Dash in Equestria Games following Rainbow Falls, Rarity after Simple Ways, etc. In canon, the characters aren't dictated by a writer's pencil or keyboard, because there, they don't exist. On the other hand, the antagonists see the autobiographical lessons as fiction and those who wrote them as fictional characters. Neither the antagonists nor protagonists are on equal conflict ground. The ponies questioning, bashing, stalking, and abusing the RM6 are treating them not as real people, but as either characters that we as readers want to replicate on paper and recreate or property that we can recycle. How the hell can the reporter — probably the one who released the 1.5/5-star rating, though that's just a guess — honestly believe the RM6 are fictional characters when he's talking to them directly? Once more, why do ponies from within their inner circles suddenly begin to see them as celebrities when they've known them for so long, anyway? This small exchange does nothing except tell the audience that all of these "antagonists" are straw men. Characters written to be proven wrong in order for the main characters to have the upper hand. What makes them so bad is that you're taking what could be valid points and eliminating them so the protagonists have the upper hand in everything they do. You're making what should be a complex conflict completely one-sided, thus telling parents that the episode — and show, if they watch it for the first time — is trying to emotionally manipulate children into viewing the plot through a black-and-white mentality. F&M uses real talking points from within the fandom, checks them off, and morphs them into abusive caricatures of fans rather than taking the good, bad, and recreating them into what fans as a whole truly are — people. In layman's terms, what could be a good lesson is morphed into a bad one. Straw characters helped ruin the Fluttershy Micro, Root of the Problem, Spice Up Your Life, AND here. NEVER use straw men to teach a lesson! Good melody, poor lyrics. While the musical melody for Work in Progress is good, the lyrics make the song the worst of the season. (Yes, worse than the duel between Big Mac and Stereo Pop.) The song (and by extension, the "we're not flawless" moral) is a loaded statement. Everyone knows the characters are flawed and how important the combination of both strengths and weaknesses makes the characters appealing, relatable, and memorable. Sometimes, the characters make really terrible mistakes, but what makes them work or not is whether these mistakes make sense or not. Sometimes the showrunners make sloppy, careless, or lazy mistakes, and people criticize the execution of the characters and story, because they love the show and know the writers can do much better, hope they learn from their mistakes, and hope these mistakes don't happen again. The "It's flawed" excuse is as stupid as "It's a kids' show." Flawed characters don't make up for poor characterization, worldbuilding, or writing overall. When you're a moral-driven cartoon with huge focus on likeable characters like this one, your reasons for characters (especially ones designed to be role models to children) to act like jerks must make sense. "In character" and "flawed" don't justify bad behavior. Think through your implications! Time and time again, the show has a history of not thinking through the unfortunate implications. Sometimes they're small and don't affect the story so drastically. Other times, they completely affect the entire story and moral. See DQ, Mare Do Well, OBA, and Hard to Say Anything. Here, the implications (in story and out, small and big) are abundant. The RM6 out Daring Do as real, invading her privacy. Pinkie's laughed at by ponies who's known her since at least season one, implying that their appreciation for her and friendships together are lies. The implications surrounding Lemon Chiffon. The fact that ponies from Canterlot and Ponyville suddenly become enamored at the idea of the RM6 publishing the journals. I wrote it earlier, and I repeat it. Place this episode in season one, adjust the story to remove the implications, and write better jokes, this is passable. Why? Because we still haven't fully acquainted with the Mane Six and Ponyville. But have Ponyville and Canterlot act like they never knew them from the beginning in a season-seven episode? A time when where they're celebrities and help spread the Magic of Friendship abroad? Nonsense! Do they genuinely care about the ReMane Six, or was their appreciation for them prior to F&M a waste of time? This moment, when White Lightning walks away, hurt by Lemon's insults of FS: This is supposed to represent how sometimes very vocal negativity can drive a wedge in discussion and may make people fear to express themselves. It becomes even worse when the person is brigaded by many like-minded negative people, creating a very toxic atmosphere. Toxicity goes both ways. "Toxic positivity" is as true as "toxic negativity." As far as the scene itself's concerned, the characters' fans and haters both attempted to trespass on Twilight's property, and it's assumed WL's part of that crowd. It's very difficult for me to pity her when she behaves as poorly as everyone else. The moral is really clunky. It's supposed to be about how despite a whole bunch of people trashing the work, as long as some enjoy it, the effort's worth it. But there's a difference in what you're trying to say and what you're saying. After the song and friendship speech, both sides resumed their bickering and feuding. The lesson paints all of the abuse as merely an obstacle of their next friendship quest. However, this isn't merely an obstacle. These fan clubs and haters are willingly or accidentally ruining their livelihoods. Rarity's boutiques remain boycotted; AJ still can't figure out how to eject her freeloading fanclub; Dash will still be nagged by brats in the sky; haters will still stalk and verbally abuse Fluttershy; and old friends will continue to treat Pinkie like an automatic laugh track. Only Twilight can deal with her problems post-credits. What happened here is not okay and shouldn't be handwaved for the sake of a cheap gag. Coconut Cream and Toola Roola are (apparently) a metaphor of the show's assumed primary demographic: young girls. Because of how self-referential Fame is, how those two fillies are the only ones not the ReMane Seven who are sympathetic, and how they're the only ones who actually the lessons to heart, it sends an unintended message that little girls who take the morals to heart are the only people who matter. What makes this toxic? Let's go back to Twilight's quote from before: Parallel this to the brony fandom and FIM. Would anyone want to take the lessons to heart if they're not entertained first and foremost? FIM's educational entertainment, the emphasis intentional. Everyone wants to be entertained when watching the show. But answering the question as this is a generalization. Critically think why you like the show. Why are you entertained when watching it? What entertains you about it? For some, it's easy, not so much for others. Bronydom is a fanbase of millions. Like human fingerprints, each reason why each brony — yes, little boys and girls count as bronies, too — watch the show and what they value most in the show is very individual. Could be the stories they tell for one, the colorful cast another. One may like the Mane Eight equally, some more than others, or have a dislike of at least one of them completely to the point where they can't stand 'em. For others, could be varying degrees of heart, humor, storytelling, and so forth. For another, how both kids and adults alike can watch it without shame. Hell, the morals of friendship they teach may be the primary reason a few watch it. How much they personally emphasize depends on their preference. Earlier this season, A Flurry of Emotions hinted this moral in the background; whether it's intentional or not doesn't matter. Spearhead creates abstract pieces of art with intent of witnessing other ponies' reactions and emotional experiences once they see them. He understands how each one reminds Cadance and SA of Flurry Heart and dearly missing her and that someone else will react really differently. He's explicitly open with this fact. No one watches the show the same way, either. To echo, Twilight and the entire premise affirm that if the ponies don't learn the friendship lessons and grow from them, then whether you like the journal or not, you're not worthy of being listened to. The moral in itself implicates this by using two fillies as tokens. Combine that thought to bronydom, and it implicates that you're only a fan if you take the friendship lessons and morals to heart; if you don't, you don't qualify for a fan. I doubt that's supposed to be that way. But from how the story's themes were presented and what the characters believed, it makes sense why many take it that way. Because that ideal, accidental or vice-versa, is dishonest in every facet. Some may love aspects of the journal, some may hate it. Others may have equal or less sharp reactions. You can control the content you put in, but not how they feel when they view it. How you, the ones who publish it, respond to it is up to you. Likewise, to repeat from before, no one will react to any FIM episode, comic, short, or EQG film/special the same. No professional material (episode, movie, comic, short, etc.) is free from questioning. Do they miss the point sometimes? Absolutely. All of us have done that, myself including. But when the characters behave out of character, you paint an uplifting and likeable world as cynical and mean-spirited for the sake of the story, and/or teach dishonest and hurtful messages, then criticizing and bashing the story's integrity is fair game. For that matter, and this is a message to everyone reading this review, people regardless of age are entitled to like and love the show how they see fit. People are entitled to dislike and even hate episodes. People are entitled to criticize episodes if they suck. People are entitled to take NO lessons to heart! Does any of this make them lesser of a fan than others? If your answer is yes, exit the page now. Aside from the mane characters, CMCs, and the other two fillies, everyone is a quarter-dimensional, abusive caricature of specific groups of fans. Each set Twilight encounters includes the entitled fan, collector, hate mob, brat, and freeloader. Swap lines within their groups, and their personalities are exactly the same regardless of who's speaking. There's no redeeming quality in anyone here. But what makes this really sad? a. Both kids and adults combined represent these stereotypes, including ALL adult fans. The fact that all of them are false representations of who fans are regardless of age talks down to not only adults who watch the show, but also little kids. The episode paints a broad brush on every antagonist by turning them all into one-note bullies. Every adult (both the lovers and haters) acting so petulant hurts the episode's themes, messages, and reinforces awful geek-centric stereotypes. On their own, the stereotypes are bad enough; it's even worse when using them to try to teach a moral to children. b. F&M doesn't isolate the criticism from the abuse and reacts very defensively to valid (and dated) talking points. Fans (including big Fluttershy fans, like myself) criticized her, because we know they can write her better. (We're seeing this now with AJ and her flanderization.) Ironically, the past three seasons are among her best of the series, thanks to the criticism. Even though he wasn't in the episode, Spike wouldn't have his best season last year had the fanbase not hammer them for their poor treatment of him for so long. c. As written before, these caricatures are straw men. d. Recall the quote: It applies to everyone, not only Pinkie. Most of the characters have been present since the pilot, a large chunk (i.e, Lyra, Bon Bon, Daisy, Lemon Hearts, Twinkleshine, Rose, Amethyst Star) with canonical characterizations prior. The background characters became beloved from their antics, spawning ideas, theories, and other creative forms of imagination. When characters do something with the mane characters, like help, sing, or dance, they tell us how much these ponies care for one another. Slice of Life works in so many ways, one of which is how much they care for each other and see others as part of Ponyville's soul. They actively helped Matilda and Cranky prepare an impromptu wedding and fussed little. The moral and animation presentation make it feel like they accomplished something. So, what do they accomplish here? Becoming ungrateful bastards. That's not what the show stands for. It's so out of character of the show's welcoming atmosphere and progressive morale. Rebuttals to some/common/eventual defenses for this episode. When all we see is everyone from Ponyville or Canterlot behave like assholes, you're telling us to assume that everyone from both towns behaves like this. The same logic applies to bronydom. When 99% of all the audience sees is badly-behaved fans, you paint an impression that this is not only the norm within the brony fandom, but that almost everyone who's a brony is some kind of "manchild." You're guilting people by association. If you're trying to suggest that it's only a portion, either SHOW a portion or clearly dictate that that these jerkasses, while very loud, don't represent the whole. Don't use real talking points. Consolidate the assholes to a spare few, while making the characters recognize throughout that kids and adults — not just two kids — do care about the journal and their well-being. Two episodes apply your defense much better than Fame: Spike's Search from G1. Stranger Than FF. Yes, Quibble can be an elitist and sometimes a bit of a jerk. But he's also a fan of Daring Do like the rest in the con, and the ep never lets you forget it. Just a fan of the first three books. It's very clear to the audience that he was only one bad apple within that entire con, yet the episode treats him as a genuinely good person who just got caught up. On top of that, he learns his lesson at the end. This entire episode is very laid back in tone, so the writers are able to get away with cartoony shenanigans, the satire, and a bunch of the humor. The Daring Do con is a satire of fandom conventions and their quirky charm. It shows us how dedicated many Do fans are, but the con is written in a way so the audience knows it's in good fun. We as people see ourselves in that con, but its accuracy and good-nature comedy make it funny. We laugh at ourselves by simultaneously laughing with the writers. BTW, thanks to Fame, I respect and appreciate Stranger now. Though I stand by on Quibble being OOC in the second half, I was wrong to call him a stereotype, and I was really unfair towards the episode the entire time. Self-deprecation comes primarily not at the audience's expense, but at their own. We're not laughing at ourselves, but at the situation the comedians are in. Rodney Dangerfield was amazing at it: He always never took himself seriously, knew that the audience and he were going to have a great time together, and was just an all-around good guy. You know who was great at making the audience laugh at themself? A hint: he just passed away. Don Rickles. He could deliver any type of insult at you. There was no line he couldn't cross. So why was he funny? Again, Rickles never took himself seriously. The lighthearted tone in his routines loosens the atmosphere and makes the audience more receptive to the jokes. Rickles knew how to insult you without getting personal. He put in the effort to make you laugh through his performance. If they laughed, then he succeeded. He roasted everyone and made them laugh so hard that they couldn't breathe. Despite his act on stage, he was an excellent person behind the scenes. The stories people tell about him show how good he was as a person. When he has that good of a reputation, the audience knows his insult routine is all in good fun. Some of his best roasts were to people he respected or were close friends with, like Sinatra and Reagan. In short, guilt-trip someone who's insulted to laugh at themself, the joke is neither good nor funny. It failed. To double-down and accuse them of being part of the problem is hypocritical. Like "SJW," "fanbrat," "fanboy/girl," and "alt-left," this pejorative jumped the shark. In fact, I hated it ever since I heard it. Why? Because it mocks people just for being able to feel. You're directly trolling people for sharing an emotional response. You mandate that people should act like robots or live in some kind of hive mind. Humanity doesn't work that way. Diversity helps shape up our world. You can't control people's emotions. Ironically, calling people "snowflakes" or "sensitive" is hypocritical, too, 'cause you're emotionally reacting to their emotion. "But why do you love Cutie Map, when it's one of the most cynical settings of the show?" Glad you asked, my imaginary questionnaire. This setting is completely confined into that town only, and both its presentation and Mane Six's reactions make it clear that what they see around them is not normal. Everyone's happiness is completely controlled. Starlight continually brainwashes Our Town's inhabitants into sticking to her ways, or else. Starlight was a ruthless, calculated control freak. Not to mention she was the villain. Something folks like her should do. If she wasn't so evil, then it won't make any sense. It was also very well written. DHX very carefully planned everything about that episode from beginning to end, and the Mane Six figured out how to solve a life-threatening friendship problem very cleverly. In short, TCM's about celebrating diversity and free will, not the opposite. It's cynicism done right. Congratulations for answering your own question. There's no place to treat real people and groups of real people like stereotypes in any show, especially one with intent to educate to children. The fact that we teach kids that (ageist) stereotypes are A-OK in entertainment makes me take it very seriously. This show is way better than this pandering schlock. The better the show, the more it respects kids. And, yes, kids DO care about lore/worldbuilding. If they don't, then why is magical thinking so important in children's development, and why do psychologists and high-quality children's educational shows (i.e., Arthur, Mister Rogers', Sesame Street, Shining Time Station, Magic School Bus, Dragon Tales) value it so much? In a June 2017 interview from The Hollywood Reporter, Hasbro CEO Brian Goldner admitted that boys make up 30% of FIM's TV audience, and they no longer allegedly aim toys to a specific gender. Observe the recent trend of FIM being marketed to boys AND girls over the past year-plus. With Let Toys Be Toys campaigning for the desegregation of toys, Audi's Spanish branch publishing a car commercial satirizing gender roles, and companies like Target, Toys R Us, and TJ Maxx (for clothes) de-sexing aisles, this trend is only (hopefully) continuing. Focus that back to MLP. Zacherle founded the franchise as a unisex toyline, and MLP & Friends was for all ages regardless of gender. Faust and crew published FIM as an all-ages, gender-neutral show, too, and it's been that way since. The family-friendly approach and refusal to apply gender and age barriers onto their stories and world are two background reasons why the fandom became so enormous and boisterous. The point? "It's for kids" is a stupid excuse. Being for children shouldn't affect the quality of your product. To use it regardless of circumstance talks down to kids and treats them like idiots. Apply this to "it's for little girls," as well. Labeling FIM as for (little) girls shoves gender roles upon our children, segregates genders into categories, applies different standards of quality to girls when it should be universal, and treats girls as tokens to excuse misogyny and misandry. Being a "good girls' show" shouldn't matter. Be a good show, period. It's odd how no one has come forward to claim credit for the aired product. Larson repeatedly disassociated himself from this episode, both in ToonKritic's podcast and on Twitter. Big Jim was unaware, too: I don't know what happened behind the scenes, but given the visual and audio evidence, the theory of it being a lighthearted poke either originally or after submission to Hasbro deserves the benefit of the doubt. However, for the aired product, it's ridiculous to claim it's lighthearted when Ponyville and Canterlot treat them like crap and the characters become emotionally distressed and scared as a result. Unlike Best Night Ever, Slice of Life, and Stranger, the meta conflict and character reactions are supposed to be taken seriously. The tone and mood are played straight; both sides treat the matter as a really big deal. Laughing and grimacing at the stereotypes don't a satire make. That's why The Good, The Bad, and The Ponies isn't a parody (despite its intentions), and the same applies here. Razgriz made an excellent point last month when criticizing Fame, and I echo my reply on Discord to here with changes: You can't have a show without an audience. People watch and follow the show out of interest, admiration, and so on. They don't watch to get called out. It's a bad move to taunt any portion of the fanbase, because it can come across as an attack on the people you're not attacking. "Lighthearted fun" or "a portion" makes no difference. If you're going to respond to any group of fans, you BETTER know what you're doing. Rickles knew what he was doing when roasting people. Whoever ghostwrote this script didn't. If you have that thought, erase it. There's no excuse for anyone to abuse the showrunners, and I never condone it. I'm on record of being against it, sometimes replying to users angrily when they do. No matter how angry we get at episodes from time to time, these showrunners, animators, and editors are people. They earn as much respect as everyone else here. The criticism, even the harsh ones, are aimed at the product. If I criticize the company or showrunners, it's for their lack of effort if applicable because I know they do better, releasing something with stereotypes or harmful morals (since kids are impressionable), or their behavior if they cross a line (which I've done to no one but IDW's Ted Anderson for his sexism). But I don't get personal; that's a no-no under any circumstance. At the end of the day, DHX is an entity full of people like you and I. That "argument" is the most obvious self-fulfilling prophecy I've heard within fandom in quite some time. One thing the show does very well is it creates and enforces a very uplifting, inviting atmosphere. The pastel colors, likeable mane characters, likeable background ponies, idealistic solutions to friendship, and proactive approach to solving friendship problems tell the audience this isn't supposed to be that type of world where "realistic" doesn't translate into stereotypical cynicism. This was one of the themes when the show started, and it's shown by how Ponyville and Pinkie actively welcomed Twilight in the Golden Oak Library. Sometimes even when the episodes don't do as well, it stays true to its tone. Think about this. When were the episodes at their best? When it shoots up. Hurricane FS, Winter Wrap Up, Perfect Pear, Lost Frickin' Mark! Even when it doesn't do as well as it should, like A Friend in Deed, it still capitalizes on that welcoming, confident setting. OTOH, what are some of the biggest flaws in Mare Do Well, PYHD, Ponyville Confidential, Bats!, Filli Vanilli, 28PL, Newbie Dash, and Owl's Well? The mean-spirited tone. Everything about it is not only completely cynical, but also done in a way that completely beats down on the mane character and makes it act like the entire world is out to get them. When the setting dials up the mean-spirited tone, it makes the world they're living in very unpleasant to watch. Do so with an idealistic, uplifting world like FIM's, then it's done for no other reason than to serve the plot. If you're gonna present something mean, make it feel organic. Each time the series turned up this level of contrived cynicism, the quality of the atmosphere and overall story degrades. You're piling on cruelty again and again just because. Fame, to repeat it, has that same flaw. Ironically, it's similar to one of season 2's worst, which Larson wrote and took credit for: (Link to poster.) Replace the gossiping theme and CMCs with fandom and the ReMane Six, respectively, and you get the same episode. Remove the fandom allegories; all you have left is a town deciding to suddenly declare the ReMane Six famous and treat them like dirt just because they can. So, here's a question, and think about it long and hard. If Fame and Misfortune didn't include fandom allegories, would you grin viciously at this episode? Would you act like white supremacists following Trump's election victory and publish the vitriol in the first place? For a good chunk of you, chances are it's gonna be "no." That alone means Fame is a failure. This "bravery" is cowardice and a self-centered desire to air your dirty laundry as well as support the idea that kids should embrace lazy shortcuts of entertainment. Excusing this lowbrow shit is bad enough. To do so through this doesn't make this episode any better. In fact, you only make it worse. One final note. A few self-contained scenes completely contradict continuity…but I held out one more: the whole premise itself. There's no care in backstory, worldbuilding, and contextual logic in any way, shape, or form. Echoing WaterPulse offsite, it feels like the one(s) who ghostwrote it didn't give a damn about the Equestrian world or threw it all away just to drive home a point. If the story doesn't care about the rich, ever-growing world, why should your audience? Conclusion: Wow. Just…wow. Now, to give Fame some credit, it has a lot of potential. The material to create an excellent satire is there. We as a fandom have its strengths and flaws. A good, effective satire can allow the fandom to actually poke fun at itself: acknowledge the problems, yet do it that makes it funny and not anger-inducing. Stranger pulls it off rather effectively, particularly within that con and treatment of Quibble as a nice albeit stubborn guy. And apparently, this was supposed to be lighthearted, too. So, what the hell happened? Where's that traditional love and care for the audience? How did the show (which aired The Perfect Pear one episode prior) manage to publish an episode that was so wrapped up in trying to send a message to its audience that it forgot to write a story, much less a good one? Larson makes it known that plenty of it was ghostwritten during development, and the fact that nobody claimed responsibility for it is troublesome. That doesn't mean DHX doesn't deserve the benefit of the doubt. Far from it. They're a reputable company, and the people within care about their craft and the quality they publish. I feel very sorry for Larson. Even though many of his ideas weren't his, laws require him to be credited for it. This episode as is feels out of character of him. Out of everyone who worked for the show, he's closest to the fandom. He may've screwed up on one satire, but that was due to story oversights, not spite. Additionally, in every episode he writes, he focuses a lot on sticking to the continuity and not contradict it; neither episode that keeps it in mind (this and MMC) were his fault. I originally skipped this one, because I believed it was going to be bad. After watching it the first go around (and then skimmed through a second time), it blew me away. Was it as bad as I thought? No. It's twenty times worse. Fundamentally, it's broken. It doesn't understand what a parody is supposed to be; it tries to parody obnoxious fans, yet the characters play everything so straight that it's treated as a serious plot instead of a satire. Continuity is ignored for the sake of the story, both in sections and throughout. Jokes are rammed in without focus on having them make sense. The premise used the idea that the ReMane Six would finally be recognized as a result of their journal, even though their celebrityhood dates back to the pilot in Ponyville and Canterlot and expanded following MMC. Fanatics are painted with a broad brush by having everyone sans two fillies portrayed as abusive caricatures. Yet, by combining valid criticism with the abuse, reducing existing characters into less-than-flat caricatures and ageist stereotypes of fans, and painting the antagonists as seeing the RM6 as only fictional characters, the antagonists become straw men, damaging the story and morals. The beginning is stupid, and it only worsens with each passing minute. Starlight's appearance, her best since reformation, is wasted here. Fame & Misfortune panders to the lowest common denominator. Lazy, dishonest, and intellectually offensive. This garbage exists as is to check off common talking points within the fandom, whether it makes canonical sense or not. Whoever decided to warp the script into a callous attitude should be ashamed of themself. It overtakes 28 Pranks Later as the most mean-spirited take of Equestria in the entire show and is fundamentally worse than Rainbow Falls and EQG1. Unlike Fame, those two tried to tell a story. Add the unfortunate implications (the ageism, enforcement of tired geek-based stereotypes, and treatment of Coconut and Toola as tokens), it's even worse. It's both my most hated and (so far) worst episode of season seven. At the start of the review, my bottom-13 was like this: One Bad Apple Bridle Gossip Newbie Dash Dragon Quest The Crystal Empire Rainbow Falls 28 Pranks Later Princess Spike P.P.O.V. The Mysterious Mare Do Well Owl’s Well That Ends Well The Show Stoppers Putting Your Hoof Down Now, after talking about another awful episode (Newbie Dash) with King Clark, it's now this: One Bad Apple Newbie Dash Fame and Misfortune Bridle Gossip Dragon Quest The Crystal Empire Rainbow Falls 28 Pranks Later Princess Spike P.P.O.V. The Mysterious Mare Do Well Owl’s Well That Ends Well The Show Stoppers
  9. A few days ago, I watched one of Mr. Enter's older videos: a countdown of his ten worst FIM episodes of the series (only the first three seasons counted). At the time, Dragon Quest was his second-worst, only behind Putting Your Hoof Down. The one thing that caught my attention when summarizing DQ's issues is how he called an episode from G1 better than this. After a quick Wiki search, I found Spike's Search, a 1987 episode from MLP & Friends, containing the following summary: Hmm…similar to DQ, ain't it? For those who are curious, here's a link to the episode: Let's quickly get a few of Search's flaws out of the way. At the time, all animation was hand-drawn, so you'll see shortcuts. A chunk of this animation is more dated than a classic Scooby Doo episode. The lip-syncing is horrible. Many times, the characters were saying one thing, yet their lips say something else. The B-Plot — Weston the Eagle looking for his parents — was dropped until the resolution. The song…not good, either. Both lyrically and vocally. The dragons are stereotypical bullies. Fortunately, this story isn't a dud, and plenty of the faults come from the standards at the time. The background is really good, and Spike is very sympathetic with a noble goal. If I tell you more, I won't be able to explain why Spike's Search is better than DQ. How better? Well, let's get crackin'! The trigger. Every story has to set the conflict somehow, and this is no exception. Two adjectives apply to DQ: sexism, xenophobia. The entire episode is prevalent in this nature, including the opening act. Spike's desire to know about his origins and family comes from their infamous conversation within the ditch: Dash laughs at (and insults) Spike for his pink apron (along with his so-called "feminine" action of baking cookies), and this: This is just one part, but it ruins the story as a whole. Spike's friends declaring how not acting like other dragons makes him better than the rest of the population. In story context, let's put it this way: Not convinced? Apply it to real life: Not funny now, is it? The xenophobia comes from the ponies mocking dragons as a whole for their supposedly brutish, tough, ugly-looking, and aggressive nature while not understanding at all who dragons as a race truly are physically, emotionally, and psychologically. For all the audience knows, they're knocking them through perception, not fact. The one thing all six are aware of about them is their migration patterns. In Spike's Search, that conversation doesn't exist. As the group played volleyball, Spike sneezes, accidentally shooting fire in the process and frightening all the ponies. Spike repeatedly apologizes, and both Megan and brother Danny continually reassure him that it wasn't his fault. Though, the fact that he nearly hurt ponies triggered his guilt, and sneezing fire multiple times afterwards doesn't help. While Spike's friends from DQ peer-pressured him into joining the dragon migration, Spike from G1 pressured himself to find his family. His quest to find his parents stems from the belief that they'll better raise him, control his accidental fire-breathing, understand manners, and so forth. In short, he feels like he belongs better with other dragons. The stereotypical bully. Both Dragon Quest and Spike's Search use the stereotypical bully. It's a big flaw in both episodes. But if you ask me which stereotypical bully is better, it's from Search. Why? DQ attaches both age-old teenage boy and teenage bully stereotypes along with the bully archetype itself. All of their mannerisms are simplified human beliefs of masculinity: overly aggressive, greedy, vocal, the "traditional" teenage boy voice, a lust for intimidation, macho, and selfish. Design-wise, each dragon is supposed to represent what a dragon looks like in their teenage phase. With each scene, the episode shames Spike for being a dragon (and to parallel it, a boy IRL for traits completely unlike a "normal" boy). Spike's Search doesn't do that. He's originally happy to take part in the group of adult dragons, but is taken aback by their rudeness, greed, and selfishness. When two dragons insulted him for his size, the older king dragon dissented and crafted colorful language to try to make him prove to the group that he belongs in their gang. Rather than initially trying to physically bully him into joining or else, the king dragon emotionally lures him via mind games. Most importantly, the metaphors of dragons = boys and ponies = girls don't exist. Not only aren't the labels of masculinity and femininity visually depicted, but the dragons don't attempt to classify ponies as female-oriented, either. Instead, the dragons use Spike's naiveté to bring them into Dream Valley to further manipulate him. The climax. Search's climax is infinitely better. DQ: Dash, Twilight, and Rarity challenge the dragons to a fight, and Spike disassociates himself from his race, literal fighting words to the dragons. So, what do they do? Run away. *sigh* Talk about a major anticlimax. Spike's Search: Spike's friends assemble a party to lure them into a trap. Their weapon of choice: rushing water that temporarily douses their fire-breathing. If they're going to bully people throughout the town and their close friend, there'll be consequences. Since they use fire, words, and size as weapons, Spike's friends using their strengths against them creates a satisfying comeuppance. The moral. This is what seals it. So, what makes this very different from DQ? How it's set up. To reiterate, Spike wants to be a grown-up dragon and initiated his quest on an accident. Dragon life isn't automatically declared to be inherently inferior to pony life at any point. Hell, the group supported him throughout, and both he and Danny walked together to find some. Additionally, it emphasizes that this is only a cluster of dragons, not an actual representation of dragons as a whole. It doesn't metaphorically differentiate boys from girls. With it absent, the sexism implications don't exist. When Spike begins to believe that the dragon life is about bullying other people, Danny quickly interrupts him and reminds him that those dragons aren't the only ones out there. There are different kinds of ponies and dragons. Rather than affirm a generalization to both him and us, he tells Spike he only ran into some bad luck. This type of moral applies as much today and can be done really well if you know what you're doing and tell a decent story in the process. Conclusion: Friendship Is Magic is a great show, but it screws up royally here and there. Dragon Quest stands as season 2's worst due to sexist stereotyping, racism implications, and botching the moral of how no one group is a monolith by generalizing a select few as the whole. Is FIM better than G1? Yes. But sometimes it can take a lesson or two from its predecessors. Albeit with worse animation, Spike's Search does DQ's same plot nearly twenty-five years prior better.
  10. Well, just like last time I could really use some feedback on how to improve (not only to improve but it also helps with motivation). And maybe I am more likly to get some when only posting one video? Anyway here is my review.
  11. I have started doing mlp reviews and the main reasons I did this (besides discussing the show) is to improve my editing and voice acting skills. However I could really use some feedback on what exactly I should improve on to focus those things. So please check out my first couple reviews and tell me what I should improve on. https://youtu.be/-Vjg0wlB0O4 https://youtu.be/Koxvzz9pny8 https://youtu.be/0zknDPwwXII https://youtu.be/RA0bJuurV6s
  12. The Traveler Pony

    Analyst bronies red vs blue buck ball game

    NickyVmlp, Golden Fox and Key Frame should play Mad Munchkin, KP and Aeon of Dreams in a red vs blue buck ball game, With Lighting Bliss as a cheerleader as inspired by Roundtable is Magic 21: Buckball Season w/NickyV and Animechristy! this took me a while and apologies for inconsistency in size it is hard when they are all different sizes to make it all relative to all other ponies and fit on one page of A4
  13. LZRD WZRD

    Analysis of the Individual in MLP

    I've previously discussed individualism in relation to the season 5 trailer as well as in relation to cutie marks. However there's so much more to say about other episodes and aspects of the show. I suppose the best place to start is right at the beginning with Friendship Is Magic. It starts out with Twilight saying she doesn't need friends. Of course by the end of the episode she's made five new friends and now realizes the importance of having them. What's important to note is that these friends are not simply ponies like Twilight. They all have distinct personalities and talents. Each of them contributes to the group in unique ways. There is no correct way to be, as shown by the way in which they all provide useful services. To go further, every one of them has a special trait that powers the magic of friendship. What's important is that no element is more powerful than the other and all of them are necessary. As we see in The Return of Harmony, all of them play an imperative role in channeling the magic of friendship. Not only is everyone important, but nobody is replaceable. When Twilight substitutes Spike in for Rainbow Dash, their magic fails. All of these support that the FIM universe sees everyone as having value. But more than just that, it also encourages openness to other ideas. To illustrate exactly what I mean, I'll use a character who seems at times to be unappreciated by the other characters in the show: Pinkie Pie. From the first episode it's shown that others don't always approve of her antics. The others roll their eyes when Pinkie begins singing. But as they soon find out, this is actually just what they needed. Just because something seems counterintuitive, doesn't mean it's wrong. No episode demonstrates this better than Feeling Pinkie Keen. It's often criticized for promoting blind faith and promoting close-mindedness, but it actually does the exact opposite. Twilight plays the role of a dismissive intellectual, who despite being presented with indisputable evidence in favor of pinkie sense, still denies it because she can't wrap her mind around it. There are plenty of scientific facts that are hard to understand and explain, but it doesn't mean that they aren't true. That's the message that episode was trying to get across and unfortunately many interpreted differently. But the fact remains that it's promoting the inquiry of all ideas. People's questions and observations are all valid to discuss. Even if it's wrong, this principle is still important. An instance where this occurs in the show is in Putting Your Hoof Down. Iron Will promotes a new philosophy for Fluttershy to follow. Of course in the end she finds that adhering to this overly assertive philosophy is a bad thing. But despite being wrong about adopting this, Fluttershy still grows from the experience. Even in failure there are positive things to be found. Furthermore, it doesn't end with them telling Iron Will he's no longer allowed to preach his ideas. He has a right to do so and it's up to the individual to decide if it's right for them. In a different sort of show, you might have him get in trouble for spreading this harmful philosophy. One of the key tenets of individualism is freedom for the individual to make their own choices, free of restrictions of state control. This is why fillies and foals can print gossip columns in their school paper. It's why it's legal to sell magic comics that can whisk you away to their dangerous worlds. It's why your allowed to journey out into the dangerous Everfree Forest if you want to. What's fascinating is that even with all powerful rulers in place with no checks and balances, Equestria is not an authoritarian or paternalistic state. Not only are you allowed to make your own choices, but expressing your individuality is encouraged. Take the CMC. Throughout the series they've explored numerous activities in search of their true passion. Nobody is telling them that they should do a certain thing or to do something because others in their family have done it. Look at Applejack. Despite being the legacy of apple farmers, she's free to explore other possibilities by living with relatives in Manehatten. It's through revelation and her own free will that she decides to return home to her roots. Just as there's nothing wrong with freely choosing to be different, there's nothing wrong with choosing to be the same. On the other hand, you have Rarity who is nothing like her parents. She's adopted a different way of speaking and behaving that way makes her happy. There's no resentment on the part of her parents for being so different. They love her all the same. To be clear though, the show promotes sincerity in following your true path. It's fine if you're like Rarity and want to be different because that's who you are. It's also great if you're like AJ and truly want to do something that your friends or family are doing because you truly enjoy it. But you shouldn't act in these ways out of obligation or if what you're doing isn't truly you. Fluttershy in Green Isn't Your Color learned this. Even though she was good at modeling and she thought doing it would make others, namely Rarity, happy, she stayed true to herself and quit. You should be honest about yourself with others and not be fearful of disapproval. Another notable pegasus who tries to live artificially is Scootaloo. Rainbow Dash is her hero and she wants to be like her so much, that maintaining that appearance becomes an unhealthy obligation. As a result, she's terrified to admit that she's scared during Sleepless In Ponyville. It's only when Scootaloo is honest about her true feelings that the burden is lifted. Again in Flight to the Finish Scootaloo is worried that she's unable to fly like other pegasi. Similarly in the episode, Rainbow Dash is trying to temper her personality to adhere to the arbitrary standards of others. What they both realize by the end of the episode is that each of them are who they are and that they shouldn't concern themselves about not living up to others' expectations. Both of them are unique individuals, with no more or less intrinsic worth than anyone else. Moving on to Rainbow Dash, she's someone who's learned to differentiate between herself and others, namely the Wonderbolts. In Wonderbolts Academy, she disapproves of the Wonderbolts' practices and rather than just going with it, she quits. You shouldn't change your own standards to match others' even if the people in question are your heroes. Then in Testing, Testing, 1, 2, 3 Dash realizes that her inability to learn in conventional ways does not mean she's stupid or that there's anything wrong with her. In the end she discovers a way of learning that works for her. The episode recognizes that we are all individuals and that the way one person is wired is not inherently better or more correct than another's. Moving on to the end of season 4, the final thing I'll examine are the roles of the princesses in MLP. While it is established that inherited royalty exists, the alicorn rulers all have their roles because they bring a powerful and unique trait to the position. More than people who have positions of power, they are special and irreplaceable. When Twilight's lamenting that she doesn't have a true role, the other princesses reassure her that she has a part to play and that she's a princess for a reason. Twilight's not there because she's super powerful or a popular figurehead. She's there because of her unparalleled ability to understand and spread the magic of friendship. She's no more or less important than the other princesses, just different. In conclusion, MLP celebrates individuality and the freedom of people to choose their own path in life. I think it makes perfect sense that the show has attracted such a diverse fan base, since one of its fundamental missions is to promote such a society. We're all different and that's ok. Great friends and people come in so many different ways and at the end of the day, the fact that their great friends and people is what's most important. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hey guys I hope you enjoyed this! I'm planning on making this into a video for my YouTube channel, which you can find right here http://www.youtube.com/user/TheLZRDWZRD I'm posting it as a blog here first because I'd very much like to get your feedback, so feel free to leave a comment below! And if you like this, go check out my other two blog entries and my latest MLP analysis videos, which are directly linked in my profile!
  14. Mentis Soliloquy

    Mentis's Video section

    This is will be my on going area for video dumps from my channel that are Pony related. Each video will have a small description before you watch, as to give a sense of what I was intending. Season 6 episodes 1&2 "The Crystalling" Review (personal)
  15. Warlock Boo

    Bronymon

    I made this for fun and wanted to know what any one thought.
  16. Last night I was busy catching up on season six, and while reading off to bed I began thinking. Many of my assossiates have told me how they thought season six was the worst of the entire show run. Yet here I was laughing and enjoying myself just like every other season preceding. So here is my proposed question, is it possible to hold unrealistic standards or overanylize a show to the point where you lose enjoyment in it? We all enjoy My Little Pony, that's why we're here. It seems that over time however that some people have forgotten that it's a kids show at heart. That's why Y7 appears in the corner of every episode after all. Yet some fans, with religious fervor, will go beyond reasonable measures to prove that it somehow isn't. This isn't to say adults can't watch MLP of course, what I'm getting at is that some people hold the show up to a high standard it will never reasonable achieve. In this way I feel that this not only alienates others from watching the show but when someone holds that high of a bar the more furious they become when it can't reach that artificial standard. I believe this is where the people crying that, "Season one/two was the best season," come into play. Again this isn't to say that one can't hold that opinion. Only that it may be because of a certain bar they hold over the older episodes that somehow limits their enjoyment of those following. Then there are those people I feel may look too deep into the show for messages that don't exist. An common example I see is the season five episode Do Prinesses Dream of Magical Sheep. In this episode Luna is tormented by the Tantabus in her dreams as penance for the Nightmare Moon incident. The moral of the episode basically can be summed up to 'Don't beat yourself up over past events you can't change and move on to make yourself a better person'. At least that's what I got out of it, but some people find another message hidden there. They'll claim it's an allegory for self harm, and it is this manufactured message that has caused people I know to leave the fandom. I personally do not agree that this is what the message of the episode is at all, and is instead a warped one to fit what that specific person wants to believe. Again I direct you to the Y7 rating. I of course am not saying that children's television can't tackle mature subjects, but do you really think that MLP is trying to honestly teach little kids the ramifications of self harm when at this stage in life they wouldn't have even thought about such things? The message is about letting go of the past for those things that weigh on us, a relatable message as I believe we've all done things we've regretted. So there is my point, are people overanylizing a kids shownto the point of seeing things that aren't there? I'll step off my soap box now. This is just a topic that has been bothering me for a while now. Do any of you agree that some people hold too high of a standard for children's media or not? Let me know, I just wanted to spark a bit of an engaging dialogue. Have a nice day everyone!
  17. Captain Whirlwind

    Analysis on Rainbow Dash

    Here is a video I've wanted to make for a while. Here is my story with Rainbow Dash I hope you all enjoy my story.
  18. Welcome again, I have created a new video. Now it handles a different kind of question, than my other videos. Why would some Brony leave the fandom. I try to analyse it, so unlike a review, I try to explain it on a regular bases with logic and provable facts. Enjoy my work. Uh and don't mind the train, I was on the road for my friend.
  19. Unknown Pony

    Viva las Pegasus Review

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81t6t7uzbDE SO yeah first reviw I had fun making it and I hope you enjoy it.
  20. hey guys. I'm working on a new My Little Pony video and I need some help . it's a pony analysis on the magic of Equestria (so original) and I need a list of strong instances of magic explained, demonstrated, exemplified. examples I have so far ~ Sombra in general Twilight using dark magic after Celestia showed her Twilight using dark magic as alicorn Twilight's rant in "Feeling Pinkie Keen" the Trixie episode the princesses transferring their magic to Twilight Tirek in general the little ponies in general the Everfree forest all the stuff Starlight Glimmer can do​ Cutie-marks in general.. if I missed any I'll appreciate it if you help me find more instances of the behavior of magical in the show.
  21. So I recently created a video discussing a counterargument towards the criticism that the Mane 5 were hypocritical in The Mysterious Mare Do Well. Let me know what you think! (also, if anyone knows how to get Premiere to export the video in the right aspect ratio for youtube, please let me know!)
  22. ndogmario

    another MLP analysis

    [/media][media] this is just another attempt in mind of doing a MLP analysis YouTube video. to be honest I don't like the way I worded some things and unlike the first analysis video I've done I actually had a script. the video is about the princesses dream of magic sheep discussing that whole self harm thingy. I explain why it's so Late at the end. hopefully this is a better quality than my last analysis video
  23. I would really like to start make analysis/theory videos for my YouTube channel. I need somepony to make the artwork of my OC though. I will give you credit in the description of each video. I'd also be willing to do a few drawings for trade. Any art style is fine. Here are the poses/faces I need (standing or sitting, which ever is easier): Neutral Happy Extremely happy Derpy (Reference: http://postimg.org/image/66cimaxpt/ ) Angry Sad Crying Surprised Sunglasses Blushing Thinking (any way you think that would look) Please make a response to this post if you are willing to help, and I'll message you. Please also be serious about actually doing this because I don't want somepony to say they'll help, and then disappear a few seconds later. I'll attach a pic of my OC. You don't have to include the gradient in mane, just leave in white if you don't know how to add it in and I'll add it myself. Thank you so so so so much in advance.
  24. The Crystal Maiden

    My Response to the 'Newbie Dash' Hate

    So I wanted to talk about 'Newbie Dash', my personal favourite episode of the sixth season so far. Despite this episode showcasing a significant moment in the show's history, (Rainbow Dash finally becoming a Wonderbolt), it has been obvious that since its air, it's received some harsh critique from what seems to be the majority of people. From what I've seen, people have generally referred to it as "cringe-worthy", badly written, placing Rainbow Dash in an already over-used plotline in which she tries to make the best of a situation in the wrong way; and probably the most common comment I've seen is the fact it seems to be glorifying/justifying the idea of bullying and name-calling. All this criticism is quite hard for me to take in, for I personally loved the episode. I thought it was the most enjoyable plotline thus far, mixing in the right amount of emotional moments with humorous moments, and being written in such a way that left me satisfied by the end, and thoroughly relating to the situation Rainbow Dash found herself in. So I've been thinking: am I weird for liking this episode so much? The one that so many people have such a strong hatred towards? If so many people dislike it, surely that must mean I've judged it wrongly and it's indeed awful. But I've decided I stand by my opinion that 'Newbie Dash' was a brilliant episode, and I've thought of a way to tell you all why. And also, perhaps, a way to explain why people hate it for the wrong reasons. So generally, it seems that the main critique of this episode is that the writers are trying to suggest that bullying and name-calling is glorified in an inappropriate way, which sends a bad moral towards viewers. We see Rainbow finally achieve her dream, but unsurprisingly find that her first day is not as amazing as expected. Specifically, what we find is that Rainbow not only makes a disastrous first impression, but her idols respond by labelling her with the nickname 'Rainbow Crash', the same name that was given to her by bullies during her foalhood. So of course, we feel for Rainbow Dash in this situation: the Wonderbolts are once again showing they can have a nasty streak about their nature, which can make us question her loyalty towards them. Because of her desperation to make a better impression, Rainbow Dash tries to find a way of standing out, first by impersonating her friends, and then by attempting a daring move at her first Wonderbolt performance. As we once again expect, this goes horribly wrong and she's forced to explain her actions. At this point, which is where most people find fault with the episode, Rainbow Dash finds her hurtful nickname is in fact a shared jab among all the Wonderbolts, reflecting on the fact they've all messed up badly in their early days on the team. Now, people severely criticized this plot point for understandable reasons. Is this a way of justifying bullying? After all, it was clear Rainbow Dash was uncomfortable with the nickname, and we hated the Wonderbolts for it, and the fact they didn't get their comeuppance was probably unsatisfying for a lot of people. Were the writers implying that teasing and mocking is okay because it's all in good fun? I can definitely understand why people would think that. For a time, I began to think like that too. But it's been some time since the episode aired and I've been debating this idea in my head. Now I believe that people might have the wrong idea about what the moral was trying to say. I think the message was less about the actual name-calling, but more about Rainbow Dash's first impression and how that made her feel. We saw her excited to join the Wonderbolts, her first day then going badly, and her nickname is used as a constant reminder of that. Because of this, she doesn't feel she truly belongs, and has to find a way to prove that she has talent, hence her ridiculous efforts to get noticed all the way through the episode. But then we find out at the end that ALL the Wonderbolts made bad impressions on their first day, which is why they were all labelled with nicknames. So, to argue against the general conception about the moral, the message seems to be saying, quite simply, that everyone has a bad first day. No-one is alone in feeling that, even the most talented people in the world who have already reached the peaks of their careers. We see that put into practice in 'Newbie Dash'. The ending is not justifying name-calling, but instead provides a way of reassuring Rainbow Dash that she is not alone in messing up her first day. ALL her idols have done it, including Spitfire, whom she arguably looks up to the most. We didn't even hear the nickname she had, so assume it must have been bad, but it puts Rainbow Dash in a better position because the Wonderbolt she looks up to the most has had her own share of bad days, and that puts her idols in a totally different perspective. Specifically, a much more positive one. No one is perfect after all. This is something I've been thinking about for a while and felt the need to get it out in the open. As stated before, I think 'Newbie Dash' is a brilliant episode, regardless of other's opinions, and truly believe this is the way people should interpret the moral. If you put that with the well-written humour and uplifting moments as we see our little Rainbow Dash finally achieving her dream, you've got an episode to remember. Go, 'Newbie Dash'.
  25. This is a video I co-wrote (and co-star for one section) with my friend GeekySteven. It's a mixture between being a parody of the famous Krusty Krab Training Video from Spongebob as well as being somewhat of a satire on the Bronalysis Community (people who review/analyze MLP). We look over the basics of what it takes to become a part of the bronalysis community and poke fun at it while doing it. We spent a good chunk of time working on this, so I hope you guys enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ZVhJVxaCI8 Please, let me know what you guys think!