Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'granny smith'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Navigating and Using MLP Forums
  • Site Problems & Questions
    • Subscriptions & Donations
  • Moderation and Rules
  • Roleplay World
    • Equestrian Empire
    • Everfree Empire

Categories

  • Approved Characters
    • Approved Cast Characters

Categories

  • Regular Banner Submissions
  • Contest Banner Submissions

Categories

  • Fanfiction Requests
  • Pony Fanfiction
  • Non Pony Fic Recordings

Categories

  • Canon Characters
  • Original Characters

Calendars

  • Pony World Cup
  • Forum Events
  • Episodes
  • Making Christmas Merrier
  • Golden Oaks Library Readings
  • BronyCon

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Forums

  • Season 9 Spoilers
    • Season 9 Spoiler Lobby
    • Season 9 Spoiler Forum
  • My Little Pony
    • Welcome Plaza
    • FiM Show Discussion
    • Sugarcube Corner
    • Equestria Girls
    • My Little Pony: The Movie
    • Classic Generations
    • Generation 5
  • Events
    • Forum Events
    • BronyCon 2019
    • Golden Oaks Library
  • Roleplay World
    • Everfree Planning, OOC & Discussion
    • Everfree Roleplays
    • The Archives
  • Octavia's Hall
    • Commissions
    • Requestria
    • Visual Fan Art
    • Fan Music
    • Written Fan Works
    • Video Fan Art
    • Pony Games, Apps, and Dev Projects
    • Other Fan Works
    • Non-Pony Artwork
  • Beyond Equestria
    • General Discussion
    • Media Discussion
    • Forum Games
    • Ask a Pony
    • Forum Lounge
  • Canterlot
    • Throne Room
    • Feedback
    • Site Questions & Technical Support
  • Poniverse
    • Canterlot Avenue
    • Equestria.tv
    • Pony.fm
    • PoniArcade
    • Ponyville Live!
    • Gallery of Goodwill
  • Conventions

Product Groups

  • Subscriptions
  • Commissions
    • Valtasar's Digital Art Commissions
    • Midnight's Commission Shop
    • Ariida-chi's Commissions
    • Ambergerr's Art Shop
    • Ody's Commissions
    • SonicPegasus Commissions
    • Berry-Bliss Commissions Store
    • Usager
    • PoisonClaw's Traditional Commissions
    • Alex Vepra's Commission Shop
    • Lucha
  • Hosting
  • Commissions Closed
    • Unicornia Workshop
  • Test

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Discord Username


Discord Server


Skype


Twitter


Fimfiction


deviantART


YouTube


YouTube


YouTube


Steam ID


Location


Personal Motto


Interests


Role


How did you find us?


Best Pony


Best Princess


Best Mane Character


Best CMC


Best Secondary/Recurring Character


Best Episode


Best Song


Best Season


Hearth's Warming Helper


Fandoms Involved In

Found 41 results

  1. We know that Celestia and Luna are immortal and possibly Twilight, Cadence and Flurry Heart as well, but maybe non-alicorns could live extremely long such as Granny Smith and possibly the rest of the Gold Horseshoe Gals. Because Granny Smith in "Family Appreciation Day" called herself a "young filly" but when the founding of Ponyville she looked more like a teenage/young mare but the founding of Ponyville was over 200 Years ago according to Twilight in "Winter Wrap Up" said "Ponyville was started by earth ponies, so for hundreds of years they've never used magic to wrap up winter" the key term being "for hundreds of years" so Granny Smith at her youngest during "Winter Wrap Up" is over 200 years old.
  2. Inspired by the recent episode Going to Seed, I’ve summarized a history of the Ponyville branch of the Apple family. I know that the writers did not have this planned out before it happened. But the way I’ve put it all together, it actually plays out like the life of a real person and family, precisely because of how messy it is. Several of the characters have a lot of dirt on them, which is unnoticed unless you collect all of the information we know about the characters, and then make connections. I’ve refrained from pointing out where this is conjecture, as opposed to details mentioned in the show, in order to increase its readability. Obviously, I’ve made several things up where there are holes. If you bother to read the whole thing, tell me what you think! As narrated by Granny Smith at the end of the episode Family Appreciation Day, the Smiths were travelling seed sales ponies. Mr. and Mrs. Smith had three children. The first two were stallions, and the third was Granny Smith. The Smiths went to market in Canterlot, and a chance meeting with the Princess gained them the plot of land that would become Sweet Apples Acres. Celestia was impressed by something in them. Perhaps she was looking far ahead into the future, and preparing for the return of her sister, and this is why she gave them the land on the edge of the Everfree Forest. In this recounting of their origins, Granny portrays herself as older than she really was at the time. A photograph shown in Apple Family Reunion depicts her as a younger filly. Granny Smith was not her given name, since the Smiths had no relation to the Apples. The dual grandmother-apple pun in the name Granny Smith only came after she became a grandmother. The Smiths planted fruit trees, with the eventual hope of selling them for profit. On the side they planted crops for sustenance. But being alone in the wilderness, a bad year would force them to leave or starve. On one such occasion, Granny Smith entered the Everfree Forest in search of food and discovered the zap apples. She and her father planted the seeds of these fruits, which inexplicably grew into full size trees immediately. Zap apple product was a hit, and gained some notoriety for the Smith family farm. For the first few years, there was no town of Ponyville, and the Smiths sold zap apple products to Canterlot ponies who would buy them, including Stinkin Rich, while waiting for their natural fruit trees to grow. The Smiths had planted a variety of crops: Apple trees, Pear trees, even carrots. But their specialty was in sales, not keeping orchards. Field hands were hired to apply their expertise and cultivate the fruits. These were none other than the Apple and Pear families. Among the Pear family who moved to the farm was Grand Pear, and among the Apples was Granny Smith’s future husband. The land had been granted to the Smiths alone by Celestia, but the Apples and the Pears entered into tenancy with the Smiths upon moving to Ponyville in order to participate in the fruit business. This arrangement persisted for some time, and in the meanwhile, the town of Ponyville was founded as the Smiths’ success grew on the market. Granny Smith loved one of the workers from the Apple family. The wedding followed soon after. Present from out of town at the first Apple Family Reunion were Apple Strudel, Auntie Applesauce, and Apple Rose. In fact, the “first Apple Family Reunion” was no such thing at all. The first reunion was, more properly, the occasion of the “union” of the Apples and Smiths: the wedding of Granny Smith and her husband. Applesauce was his aunt, a young sister of one of his parents, and Apple Rose and Apple Strudel were his cousins, the children of one of his parents’ siblings. (There are other Apples that are more distantly related; it was a large family). He and his immediate family are not pictured in the Barn photo, but that photograph does not picture everyone who was present, such as Granny’s brothers. In the subsequent generation, the Apple Family Reunion was held regularly “every 100 moons,” a length of time that seems to be variable. Ponies of the Pear, Apple, and Smith family at times left the farm to settle in the town. Granny Smith became a champion high diver in her spare time. Once Granny married into the Apple family, some lines were blurred, and the Pear family resented the kinship of their Apple colleagues and the landlord. At first, the rivalry remained healthy. After several years, Grand Pear had his daughter, Pear Butter, and Granny Smith had Bright Macintosh, her only child. The father of Granny died shortly after his first grandson was born. The Smith property and the apple orchards were given to Granny and her husband. But the pear orchards were donated to the Pear family, in return for their years of service. Still, the Pears were irritated about the privileges and prestige the Apples insisted on in the town. The mayorship was previously held by Mr. Smith while he lived. But after his death, and until the election of the New Young Mayor Mare, the mayorship succession was closely controlled by the Apple family. Further, the Apple family assumed the social influence in the town that Mr. Smith had by right of being the founder. The Pears resented the transfer of power from the Smith patriarch to the Apple family. Grand Pear pointed out that Granny’s marriage was the only reason the Apples were favored over the Pears, and so after the death of Mr. Smith, the figurehead of Ponyville, the business rivalry between farms escalated into a feud. The Pears contested the privileges that the Apples claimed for themselves as Smith kin. Grand Pear made public and slanderous comments about Granny Smith’s marriage being a conspiracy in order for the Apples to expand. Through the marriage, the Apples were taking advantage of the prestige of the Smith name in the long-term, and Granny was taking advantage of the Apple success in the short-term, to maintain matriarchy as long as she lived. Of course, the Apples defended the integrity of Granny’s marriage while Granny defended them as well, and the feud began. But Bright Mac and Pear Butter were fond of each other from a young age, even as the feud of their parents was an obstacle. In the episode The Perfect Pear, a stallion that has similar hair to Bright Mac and a mare that has similar hair to Pear Butter are shown growling at one another from either side of a fence. Assuming these are the spouses of Granny Smith and Grand Pear, they died early, because they are never present again, and their children never make reference to their absence. With the death of her husband, and with no remaining Smiths working on the farm besides herself, Granny integrated herself fully into Apple family tradition. This solidified the link between the Smith prestige and the Apples, to the extent that the two families are considered one and the same, and the Apples are often given credit for founding Ponyville. Mayor Mare, who was a contemporary of Bright Mac and Pear Butter, was elected by popular vote after a particularly bad Apple-backed candidate was forced out of office. Since Ms. Mare was a friend, the Apples approved of her, and she had competence to boot. Eventually Grand Pear did what he believed was the right choice to end the feud: concede, and move away. The clandestine wedding of Bright and Butter was crashed by Granny and Grand Pear. Granny welcomed Pear Butter “Buttercup” into the family, but Grand Pear disowned them, and left with the remaining Pears for Vanhoover. The Apples chopped some of the pear orchards down for lumber, and abandoned others. Granny greatly loved Buttercup. Granny’s marriage had also been the source of tension, and short, and since she had only been able to have one child, she looked forward to being able to help raise her grandchildren. In short, the reckless and ill-advised marriage of her son was the best thing that could have happened for her. She also “won” the feud this way. With Mayor Mare, leadership and sensible policies, rather than family machinations, ushered the town into a new era. There was discussion about whether to hire Canterlot unicorn sorcerers to accomplish Winter Wrap Up more efficiently. The consensus, pressed by the Apples and the mayor, was to continue using the manual labor. The mayor questioned the financial benefit of hiring skilled unicorns, and the Apples appealed to tradition. Big Macintosh was born to his parents Buttercup and Bright Mac, much to the delight of Granny Smith. At this time, she cleverly took on the name Granny Smith, integrating herself further in the Apple lore, while retaining her Smith heritage. Relatively soon, Applejack was born. The Apple Family Reunion had been held semi-consistently for the past two generations at Sweet Apple Acres. Family life at the farm was idyllic, and then Apple Bloom was born. Applejack’s imagination of her “Apple Chord” alter ego begins here. She learned how to play a guitar as a young filly, and the arc of the character’s rise and is a reflection of Applejack’s desire to escape during her late childhood, and her rebelliousness in adolescence, while the arc of Apple Chord’s fall and retirement is a reflection of Applejack’s settling down into the honest family pony that she is now. The mythos is entirely a creation of Applejack’s imagination, but through various trials in her life she added to or altered the story of her alter ego. The story does closely incorporate the themes of Applejack’s early adolescence, but there is not a one to one correlation between Apple Chord’s life and Applejack’s. It should also be mentioned that musical talent runs in the family; Big Mac is a skilled bass, and even Apple Bloom has shown the ability to carry a tune. Some ten years after Applejack’s birth, Apple Bloom was born. Meanwhile, Filthy Rich proposed to Spoiled Milk. An event occurred at the farm that the Apples call the Confluence, during which all of the fields give a high yield of apples. Applejack set traps for a mythical creature, but fell into her own trap and was unable to help harvest apples. This event became traumatic in hindsight for Applejack, because its memory is associated with subsequent tragedy. Shortly after the Confluence, on the occasion of Apple Bloom’s birth, the couple made plans to visit the Pears in Vanhoover, and then return to Ponyville with Grand Pear as their guest. Grand Pear consented because he was ready to put the feud aside for his daughter and grandchildren. Only Granny Smith knew the true purpose of this trip; Big Mac and Applejack never knew that their mother was from a feuding family, or that their grandfather still lived. The plan was to reconcile, and then explain everything in time. However, disaster struck, and the two died on the journey. Apple Bloom survived unharmed, and was returned to the Apples with the news. Grand Pear was devastated as well. He partly blamed himself for moving away. The whole town paid their respects and offered their continued support for the founding family of Ponyville, but Grand Pear did not attend the funeral in person. He would later deeply regret this. He kept tabs on Ponyville through old friends and connections, and he recognized that this would have been the best time to put the feud aside and reconcile with his Apple kin. He sent his regards, but out of shame he did not come to Ponyville for the funeral. In memory of his father, Big Macintosh took to wearing the yoke he had used with him during the harvest. Big Mac experienced a growth spurt. He began expressing his opinions loudly to cope with his loss. But Applejack was affected the most. She decided to run away from the farm entirely, against the will of her grandmother and brother. Granny gave her a photograph of some relatives but didn’t expect her to make it all the way to the Manehattan. When Applejack tells this story today, she doesn’t mention its connection to her parents’ death out of shame. Applejack stayed briefly with the Orange family, but found herself homesick for Apple family cooking. Admitting her selfish mistake when seeing a rainbow in the sky pointing home, she returned home to her family on the farm and received her cutie mark. This could have been the end of the Apple family in Ponyville, if Applejack had not returned. She spent a few days at a summer camp and met Coloratura, ‘Ra-Ra.’ Then she returned to work on the farm, and regained her reputation for hard work. This is all within weeks of the birth of Apple Bloom. Applejack experienced a growth spurt like her brother, and with it came vainglory. With her father deceased, she assumed that she deserved to take up his mantle and take over the farm. Without the permission of her grandmother, she made a deal with Filthy Rich. Mr. Rich was a good pony, and he was willing to give her a good deal, especially in light of the recent events. But when Applejack tried to renege, his generosity and patience was tested. Ultimately Applejack concocted the lie that Granny Smith was ill and in the hospital. Rich dismissed his anger at Applejack’s failing to honor their agreement, and visited the hospital immediately, but Applejack admitted that it all was a lie. Filthy Rich and Spoiled Milk got married and became pregnant with Diamond Tiara, who would be born a year after Apple Bloom. The town was willing to forgive Applejack, because of the recentness of the death of her parents. From that point on, she gained her reputation for being both hard working, and honest. The town of Ponyville could look back and recognize that the Apple family nearly fell apart several times within a few short months. The deaths, and then Applejack running away, and lastly, the trend toward delinquency of Applejack and Big Macintosh. Big Mac afterward resolved to speak less, and listen more. Following this, something resembling a normal family life continued until the arrival of Twilight Sparkle. The Apples continued to host reunions at the farm. They did not talk about their parents. Apple Bloom grew up taking her parents’ perishing as a normal thing. When Twilight Sparkle arrived, some of Applejack’s family traveled to the farm to witness the Rising of the Sun and help set up. Applejack later described this as a family reunion, but the occasion was not the regular reunion, but the Summer Sun Celebration. When Applejack later reminisces on the most recent reunion, she is not taking about this event. Significant for the Apple family after this was Applejack’s becoming the Element of Honesty, the near loss of the farm to Flim and Flam, Apple Bloom creating the Cutie Mark Crusaders, and Big Mac’s relationship with Sugar Belle. The Flim Flam brothers are Apples of some kind, but they have no connections with the Ponyville branch. Any cousins of the Apple siblings are second cousins at the closest. During the third year after the return of Princess Luna, Grand Pear came back to Ponyville. He was moved when he saw Apple Bloom, making sure she remembered his name, and he gave her a sample of his product for free, so that she would set in motion their reconciliation. Grand Pear did not have the courage to approach the Apples himself. As he expected, his arrival and identity became known to the Apple siblings. Grand Pear deescalated the feud with a simple apology, and he now lives in the town.
  3. Note: Expanded my original thoughts. Credit also goes to @AlexanderThrond, @Odyssey, and @OptimisticNeighsayer for it. With a world as magical and fantastical as Equestria, any form of mystical being is possible. They may sound like fairytales (or "pony's tales," as what Spike once said about the Mare in the Moon). Not too often does the show do the opposite: establish the legend of a mystical jokester no one witnessed and make both ponies and viewers wonder if he doesn't exist. Considering the amount of lore in the series (both in the TV series and comics), it's an undertaking for the show to give this concept any benefit of the doubt. That was partially Applejack's role, as her stubbornness and eye for logic initially play a role in downplaying and explaining other ways for phenomenons to work beyond a "just-because" shortcut. Additionally, Applejack's stubbornness usually lasts all the way through the climax. The Mane Attraction is the lone time to use it as a strength rather than a flaw. Just like the lore, Rapp reigns her flaw in. Instead of making her impose her stubbornness on everyone else, she's stuck with a dilemma: promise Granny and Big Mac to help round up every apple in Sweet Apple Acres and not try to hurt Apple Bloom's feelings. More on this later. Building up this dilemma in the first half was its biggest weakness, and there are a few reasons why. The first half is loaded with exposition. The rest of the Mane 8 were written off early, automatically turning it Apple-focused. But using a one-line shortcut cheapens the direction. Even the lore of the confluence (the time where every apple is ripe simultaneously) doesn't hold much weight, as it's attached to the clunky "moon" length of time and explained very early on. Additionally, the episode repetitiously reminds the viewer how catching the Sass Squatch-like trickster*; once is fine, thank you. *The AJ Micro revolved around a "Sass Squatch," a mystical creature that changed apples into squashes, and Applejack was stubborn as Boulder to try to capture him alone for most of the issue. Until the end of the flashback, it was really slow and bland, with surface jokes that aren't all that funny. Usually, they were related to either Goldie's "crazy-cat-lady" shenanigans or Big Mac's exhaustion, and nothing more beyond that. One of the only ones to work that well was Goldie's cats distracting her to steal her pancakes. Although it was a problem for the whole episode, the dialogue in the first half was quite repetitive. I don't need to specifically hear "Great Seedlin'" all the time. Throughout most of her time as a foal and filly, Applejack learned of his legend and the reward for catching it, so he spent good time every confluence to set up traps rather than buck the apple trees. However, she forgot where one of the traps were and was stuck in a deep hole for most of the day. She felt so upset for it that she felt like she let herself and her family down over trying to chase a mystical creature that may not even exist. Therefore, as what @OptimisticNeighsayer wrote, she established a "sour grapes" approach to the fairytale, eschewed the Great Seedling as nothing more than fairytale, and focused primarily on working the farm. It established why she can be so work-driven (nicely pointed by Alexander Thrond, his post linked further down), shown in past episodes like Applebuck Season and AJ's "Day" Off. So why is this, by far, the worst moment of the first half? Because of this: Goldie and Granny don't treat her mistake as a big deal, even though it is to her, evident by her tone and glum expressions. Combine that with Goldie's smugness, Granny's decision to explain right there why AJ became cynical in the first place, and their disagreement from earlier, it unfortunately implicates that Granny told AB the story as a "gotcha!" to put AJ in her place. AB tries to soften the blow by staying by her older sister and refusing to join her grandma and relative (and Goldie shaking her hoof after they accidentally ran too close was a little bit of accidental karma), but neither of them were held accountable for not taking AJ's hurt seriously, making the overall tone of the moment and flashback really mean-spirited. To borrow from @Odyssey, if it wasn't shown in AJ's point of view or have her bitterness dominate the mood, then perhaps the scene would feel more whimsical, and the tone's direction wouldn't be so convoluted. Thankfully, the rest of the episode picks up from there, focusing on Apple Bloom and AJ's bond. Whereas Sweetie Belle and Scootaloo had bonding episodes with their older sisters (both biological and surrogate) previously, AB never had that, as episodes where she shares a focus are more on herself (and for Brotherhoves Social, her relationship with Big Mac). The one time where there was some kind of bonding episode between her and AJ was Somepony to Watch Over Me, and that's an AJ-focused episode and AJ's worst appearance of the first five seasons. Recall AJ's dilemma that I mentioned earlier, and I'm going to expand from @AlexanderThrond post with my own thoughts. Yes, she wants to help everyone else, but catchin' him mattered to AB. That's why she was gentle when talking to her about it and tried to add uncertainty to the legend. More importantly, AJ didn't want her own trauma to similarly affect her. In short, to softly ask that question of the Great Seedlin' being real or not was a warning without trying to intrude. But she was also willing to help her and make her happy however possible, which is why they agreed to compromise on Day 2: If they work together to harvest the trees, they'll set up the traps later. Rather than make AJ so stubborn to the point of blindness like her Micro, the episode eases her stubbornness and allows her to be open-minded to his existence being possible. This moment and AJ's flashback tie a little bow on the first half and commence the second half's direction, giving them the bonding episode they sorely needed. Two moments, though, really stand out. Their montage was really heartwarming. Rather than let Granny and Goldie get the best of her, she helped AB prepare the traps, using both her own memories back in the day to place them in the best spots and ability to build to build them faster and effectively. Skeptical at first, she progressively showed to having a lot of fun setting them all up. Pay attention to the change of facial expression from this to this to this. When she said she had fun, she meant it; the facial expressions and length of time they put in to building those traps back her up. You can tell she was starting to evolve from an ol' prune to a shiny plum. This was the first confluence since she was a filly, and by helping AB, she reminded herself of the good fun she had then. Yes, she still has responsibilities, but quality time with her young sis healed painful wounds and let her loosen up in life. While Big Mac struggles to clean the orchard on time, AJ and AB are having fun off-screen, and after discovering an empty orchard, they'll accept any help possible to solve it, including listening to one of Goldie's Great Seedling tales. After some advice on how to improve their chances of catching him, they have one of their best heart-to-heart moments of the series. Now, even though they don't know Big Mac unintentionally disguised himself as the mythical deer, the episode makes his identity way too obvious. From the opening shot, the camera spies on him being exhausted at the table and accidentally falling asleep on the breakfast table. Over the next eighteen minutes or so, his expression and behavior deteriorate, such as sleeping on the floor, not observing his surroundings, sagging and drying eyes, not cleaning up the apples right away to knock the apples down easier, sleepwalking, and so on. However, despite the mystery behind the Seedling, that wasn't the point. Its focus was on Applejack eventually letting her hair down to reminisce and enjoy being a kid with a sister who was too young to participate last time. The hunt was merely the plot device to bring them together. So is it the worst episode of the season so far? Yes. But compared to the previous first halves, is this way better than Boast Busters, AJ's "Day" Off, Fake It, and The Cutie Pox? One hundred percent. Overcoming first-half hiccups, Going to Seed's the AJ Micro done better and a fine overall addition to the series.
  4. Playing with the ages of the characters Granny Smith is at the edges of her "prime" when the Bright Mac and Pear Butter are very young, though they can talk (about three years old). Exactly 15 years later, they marry clandestinely and Buttercup joins the Apple family. Assume that they have Big Macintosh immediately. Applejack and Big Mac can be pretty close in age, say three years apart. Apple Bloom is born much later. Big Mac hasn't aged visibly between "Where the Apple Lies" and the first episode. Let's say he's 18 in WTAL and AJ is 15. Assuming Apple Bloom is born very soon after this episode, then she is 15 years younger than AJ, and 18 younger than Mac, and her parents were 36 when they had her. Then they died, I guess. Now assume Apple Bloom is six at the start of the first episode (five year old Sweetie Belle looks a little younger, so six is probably the youngest that would make sense). That puts the meeting of Applejack's parents 39 years in the past. Assuming Granny smith was in her early thirties at that point, now she's 70. Mrs. Cake, if she were the same age as the Apple parents, would be 42 now, but keeping this number low seems necessary. We can let he be two years younger than Pear butter. This number is controlled by basically every number previously mentioned, so they have to be kept low too. As an aside, the Cakes seem to be masterful at raising an infant, so it's possible they had a previous child who has since moved out. This is possible if they had an earlier child at around 20. Mayor Mare can be the same age as the parents. So if everyone were alive at the start of the show, the ages would be: Granny Smith: 70 ( = 6 + 18 + 15 + 31) Mayor Mare: 42 ( = 6 + 18 + 15 + 3) Bright Mac: 42 ( = 6 + 18 + 15 + 3) Pear Butter: 42 ( = 6 + 18 + 15 + 3) Mrs. Cake: 40 ( = 6 + 18 + 15 + 3 - 2) Big Mac: 24 ( = 6 + 18) Applejack: 21 (= 6 + 15) Apple Bloom: 6 Wow, that sounds about right actually. Applejack says she was late in getting her cutie mark, so she can be older than the rest. AJ and Fluttershy: 21 The rest: 20. Spike hatched when Twilight was about six, so he's 14 at the start of the series. I like the idea of Starlight being younger than the Mane 6, since her Father treats her like a child, and she acts out in immature ways. I don't think she had her village for that long, say one year, or else someone would have called the authorities. The season 5 premiere happens a little more than a year after the first episode. Assuming she started the village at age 17 (having skipped a grade or something) with other impressionable young adults and ruled it for one year, that would make her 18 on her first appearance, and 17 at the start of the series (off screen). Making Trixie the same age also makes sense. Starlight: 17 Trixie: 17 What do you think?
  5. Note #1: This is one of the episodes leaked a few weeks ago (audio only). If you listened to the episode already, keep all discussion under the spoiler tag until after it finishes officially airing. (Hit the eye icon to trigger it and type within it.) DO NOT LINK OR POST THE LEAKED MATERIAL! Note #2: Over the last month-plus, some content originally leaked (e.g., the Student Six's names, episode titles, some summaries) have been officially revealed, and chances are more will, too. But as always, please keep all leaked content not officially revealed yet — and/or if you're unsure if you're revealing too much — under the "spoiler" tag. Title: Grannies Gone Wild Air Date (U.S./Disc. Family): April 14 at 11:30am Writer(s): G. M. Berrow Summary: "Granny Smith and her friends head to Las Pegasus. Rainbow Dash tags along as a chaperone so she can ride the best rollercoaster ever before it closes." DM:
  6. This very special edition of "Batbrony Reviews" is dedicated to Joanna Lewis and Kristine Songco (episode writers), Kaylea Chard and Jae Harm (episode storyboard artists), "Big" Jim Miller (episode director), Daniel Ingram (episode music), Felicia Day (Pear Butter), William Shatner (Grand Pear), Bill Newton (Bright McIntosh), Ashleigh Ball (Applejack), Michelle Creber (Apple Bloom), Peter New (Big McIntosh and Goldie Delicious), Tabitha St. Germain (Granny Smith and Mrs. Cake/Chiffon Swirl), Bill Mondy (Burnt Oak), Cathy Weseluck (Mayor Mare), anyone else who worked on the episode, and of course Lauren Faust for giving us this show and making this episode possible to begin with. Thank you all for all you contributed to making the perfect episode of a truly remarkable show. Those who regularly read my episode reviews have probably noticed by now that I have chosen to forego my usual introduction. No it didn't slip my mind, rather, it was very much an intentional decision. There is nothing "usual" about this episode, and hence a usual introduction would not have sufficed. The first time I watched this episode, I was too blown away by it, even after already anticipating it for over a month when word started getting out about how amazing it was, to really feel anything but pure joy. The second time I watched it, I spent the last five minutes of the episode crying; I have a feeling now that this may happen every time I watch it. I say this as someone who does not cry easily; the last time any movie made me cry, I believe it was Toy Story 3 back in 2010 (granted I don't go out of my way to watch sad movies, but still, even if I did I wouldn't be someone who cries just for anything). That movie made me shed some tears out of nostalgia, most likely because I was also fresh off of my freshman year of college and was watching it with my mom; this 22 minute episode of a show with a budget the fraction of what a Pixar movie costs, in contrast, made me weep like a newborn. What could have possibly elicited such a reaction? Nothing short of perfection, really. I've seen the best episode that My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic will ever have to offer to me, and I'm perfectly OK knowing it can't get any better than this. Some things just don't need to be touched or surpassed, kind of like how The Empire Strikes Back will probably always be the greatest Star Wars film of all time. That's enough set up for this, however, it's about time we got this show on the road. Without further ado, this is Batbrony Reviews "The Perfect Pear." While I obviously do not have a set format for my reviews, this review will have a very unusual format. It will break down elements of the episode in all areas (be it story, characters, writing, voice acting, animation, music, etc.) as I go through what was recounted in this episode in chronological order as it happened, not as the episode itself was organized. Seeds of a Tragedy The family feud is an old story trope in much of literature (it's also something we even observe in history quite a bit). The most famous example in Western literature (at least the one most people probably think of first) would be "Romeo and Juliet," but I would argue it is not among the finest examples of a family feud in literature (and I would hardly be the only one to make such an assertion). While the lesson is powerful and the tragic elements inherent to a family feud are there, there's not quite enough for us, the audience, to latch onto emotionally in regards to caring about the Capulets and Montagues. Romeo and Juliet are teenagers who fall in love incredibly quickly and get married before they even really know what being in love for a lifetime truly is (and subsequently die before they know as well), and the only other supporting characters who we really are emotionally invested in in regards to the feud are Tybalt (Juliet's cousin) and Mercutio (who's not even a Montague, but just a close friend of Romeo) and they die before Romeo and Juliet even do. By the end of the play, any characters we were sort of emotionally invested in are dead, the only truly likable one left is Friar Laurence, and there are no Capulets and Montagues left who we know enough about to really care about them, other than the fact that they just lost two young members of their families because of their bitter feud (whose roots we also don't know much of anything about). The writing is certainly as poetic as anything Shakespeare wrote, and as I said before, the tragedy and powerful lesson are both there, but anyone who truly knows Shakespeare would never claim that "Romeo and Juliet" is his finest or most enduring work (even if it was their personal favorite). So what makes for a truly powerful way to tackle the tragedy of a family feud? Believe it or not, I believe that "The Perfect Pear" has done just that. Yes, at the risk of sounding blasphemous, a 22 minute episode of animated television has made me feel more emotional about the tragedy of its family feud than Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" ever has. How? I mean, really, how? Well, to get to the bottom of that, we need to start at the beginning. No, not of the episode, but of the feud itself between the Apples and the Pears. The feud starts fairly innocently. In fact, you could even be forgiven for at first thinking it's about to fall into an old cliche one encounters in many children's animated programs where a family feud or rivalry between two people (that is largely played for laughs in the given show or episode) stems from something really petty or silly even. That's usually a big root of the "humor" in the entire feud. However, this episode quickly makes it clear that it is not playing up any of the feud for laughs, but is rather treating it with the utmost seriousness. Although it initially begins with Granny Smith and Grand Pear, two fierce competitors in Ponyville simply trying to outdo the other at selling their agricultural wares, merely smack talking each other in the course of business, it rapidly escalates into something far uglier than a friendly rivalry. This is nicely highlighted with immediacy and subtle urgency by the episode in a smart visual cue at the end of their first true feud with one another in the Ponyville market. At the end of that scene, the ponies they've been trying to sell apples or pears too, ponies who are their friends and neighbors, go from being excited with their products to being completely put-off by the scene before them. They don't think there's anything funny about the feud, rather, if you look at their faces, they're clearly at least annoyed and think they're both acting obnoxious, if not downright dismayed and saddened by it all. What already makes this a sad state of affairs is that we both (1) already know from over six seasons of seeing her what a lovable character Granny Smith is (which both makes the ugliness when she's in feud mode all the more jarring, as well as early on suggests that Grand Pear too was largely amicable when he wasn't feuding with the Apples), and (2) the episode itself makes a point of showing us how much the both of them love doing what they do (in Granny Smith reading stories to her apple trees at night and Grand Pear in turn making blankets for his pear trees), growing and selling apples, pears, or apple or pear products. There shouldn't be anything wrong with loving your work, but because they take their competition with each other too far in a hurry, an inherent ugliness, at least when it comes to the Apple Family vs. the Pear Family, is added to their work itself, which we know is so important to both families, central to their very identities. And so, already tragedy emerges in the Apple and Pear Family Feud, with such a bitter, ugly element added to the thing which both families love so much: their work. They build a fence between both properties that does more than simply mark the boundaries of their properties, they're constantly trying to one-up one another, and it gets to a point where eventually, none of the Apples or the Pears, especially Granny Smith and Grand Pear, can even stand the fact that they share the same community or even think of an Apple or a Pear as their neighbor. Yet amidst this growing rift between the two families, a single, small hope emerges, which eventually becomes the best hope that both families have got. Love Blossoms This hope starts off small, as so many forms of hope often do. A tiny kindness, one foal giving another a cute nickname and sharing in a sweet moment with her, that's all there is to it really. Enter Bright McIntosh and Pear Butter, who almost immediately latch onto something as foals which, by this point in time, virtually every other Apple and Pear has forgotten in regards to one another: possibility. The possibility of being friends with one another, the possibility of being even more than that, and the possibility of the beautiful things that can come out of all of that, so much more precious than anything "gained" by feuding with each other. For them, the feud is virtually meaningless right from the start. Oh sure, one's an Apple, the other's a Pear, and they both are well aware of what their families think of each other. But at no point do they let that keep them from being decent to each other and their families for that matter. Decency in turn evolves into kindness; kindness into friendship; and friendship eventually into full blown love. From the start it seems as though these two were always destined for one another at some point in time, but that doesn't make the path they take to get there any less delightful to follow. Why? Well again, we return to that word, 'possibility.' In their growing love for one another, Bright Mac and Buttercup discover that it is possible to be even better ponies for overcoming the feud. Just as tragedy is inherent to the Apple and Pear feud by this point, so too is unconditional love inherent in how these two grow up around each other. They don't go about their business holding a grudge in their hearts that could consume them any minute or lead them to do bad things in turn. No, instead they go about each day letting their love for one another channel into everything they do. So what kinda lives do they lead? Does their love save Equestria from some centuries old tyrant or ward off some monstrous creature? Do they grow to become leaders in all of pony society who everypony else looks up to? Not in the least, in fact, not even close. Now, make no mistake, what I'm about to say is no knock on the show's main characters. If anything it's rather amazing that the show continually sells the Mane 6 as such complex characters when they've done so many remarkable things by this point in the show that they could easily, in a far lesser property, morph into Mary Sues. But what this episode does is something very hard and very rare in great love stories, or many stories in general of all kinds. It highlights what remarkable, beautiful things can come out of 'normal.' Because that's exactly what Bright Mac and Buttercup are, at least on the surface. They're farmers, they like life in their quiet little town with their friends and family, and friends, family, their work and each other is pretty much all they need. Describing it like that, this all sounds very pedestrian, and I can understand why. The only thing is, well... it's not, not in execution at least. Every step of Bright Mac and Buttercup's courtship is made up of very simple acts of love: the nickname of 'Buttercup' that Bright gives to Pear Butter; Bright's confessing he accidentally destroyed the Pear's water silo when he could have let her take the blame; the two of them sharing a picnic together, complete with him giving her flowers (even if he goes a little outside the box on that one, not by choice of course ); Buttercup writing and singing a song for Bright, confessing her love for him, and he in turn confessing his love for her with a carving of their cutie marks; their sharing milkshakes, dancing far across from one another in the town square, taking walks with each other through the seasons, or even Bright just doing a chore for Pear. These are simple, normal acts of love, and yet they tug on the viewer's heartstrings very much. Let's take a look at Buttercup's song to get a sense of why, because the song is the perfect encapsulation of what makes Bright Mac and Buttercup's love story so heartwarming. "You're In My Head Like a Catchy Song" is hardly the flashiest, longest, or most complex song that Daniel Ingram has ever written for this show. It may not even be the most technically impressive number we've heard on the show. And yet, somehow I now find a song that's really only two verses long and lasts just over a minute and a half is my favorite of the entire show. Why? Because it channels beauty through normalcy in the same way that Bright Mac and Pear Butter do. It's simple, one might even say bare bones, but therein lies its charm. If it were simple out of laziness, this wouldn't work at all, but it is very deliberately simple. The simplicity is sincere, intimate, the song not sounding like some grand, staged affair which we're not sure did or didn't just happen in the story itself, but rather sounding like something Pear Butter herself could have written. Horse feathers, it sounds like something any of us could have written! Writing music is hard, especially for people who don't do it on a normal basis, so as short as that song was, when you listen to it, when you hear the careful care and attention in Buttercup's voice that she gives to every note and word, you can just picture how long this must have taken her, how much time she spent making sure it was perfect for the stallion she loves. She could have written it in an afternoon, or days, or weeks even, whatever the case, we know she put time into making it just through the performance alone. That story, the story of what she put into it, how she poured her heart into it because she loves Bright Mac that much, that's where the beauty in the song stems from. It is a pure, sincere, intimate expression of her love, their love, and for those of us who have been in love before, it grabs us by reminding us of the things, big and small, we'd do for those we love. All of this, the sincerity, the intimacy, the pureness, pervades every single act of their love. Nothing seems staged, nothing seems forced, nothing seems like it's there because it's a cliche of love stories. Sure they may all be old standbys, but things like picnics with your true love, walking with one another, giving your sweetheart flowers, or singing your true love a song, these are old standbys because couples have loved them for generations. It's not about what they're doing, though, it's ultimately about how they're doing it. These two, from start to finish, simply work. There's not a moment they share onscreen where they don't seem like they don't belong together, and that's how you know you've got a great love story on your hands. It's one thing for a story to tell us that two people are "star-crossed lovers destined to be together," but it is another thing entirely for us, the audience, to universally believe it. That takes hard work and skill in both writing and execution. Overall, this beauty of normalcy that we see in both the song and these two as a couple, the simple acts of love, their honesty and intimacy, this is what grabs us and won't let us go. This is the true heart and soul of this episode, the idea that so many wonderful, beautiful, extraordinary things that you never even imagined or thought possible can stem from even the simplest love if its strength and pureness are immeasurable. We may not be capable of saving a magical land of talking horses with ancient, magical artifacts, but what we are all capable of is plain old love, whether it be for friends, family, or yes, even the love of your life. And just like Bright Mac and Buttercup, we too are capable of producing wondrous, beautiful things the likes of which we may have not once thought possible if we hold in our hearts a true, pure love for those dear to us as they did for one another. Tragedy's Greatest Blow And yet, just when things seem to be heading to an inevitably happy conclusion, that old Apple Family and Pear Family feud rears its ugly head again in the worst way yet. Very suddenly, Grand Pear announces that the Pears are moving away from Ponyville, much to Pear Butter's dismay. There is certainly a logic to his making the move; there is more business opportunity for them in Vanhoover and less competition from an equally ardent farming family, so there is plenty that makes sense about it. Yet the sad part is that one can't help but get the sense that these are not Grand Pear's overriding reasons for moving. He just has too much hate in his heart for the Apples by this point, and it blinds him to so much. Not simply what his daughter is going through with Bright Mac, but also the fact that this is his family's home by this point. That they have a loving community of friends and neighbors around them who love what they do, that they're a cornerstone of this community, that they'd be throwing all of that away in the name of profit and getting away from a family which he insists they can't stand. With all this in front of us, I can't help but conclude this move is more about getting away from the Apples, ignoring everything wonderful about living in Ponyville, all in the name of a stupid, needless feud. Most tragically of all, it threatens to snuff out the possibility of the beautiful things that may come of Pear Butter and Bright Mac's love for one another, the possibility that they have always believed in. In fact, it comes very close to doing just that; understandably, Pear Butter can't imagine leaving her family. We don't exactly know if her mother is still in the picture or around at this point as we never see her, and it doesn't seem she has any siblings either, so for all we know her father may be the closest family she has left, not counting her more distant relatives. So it makes sense, very sadly, when she sadly announces to Bright Mac that she has to stick with her family in spite of her undeniable love for him. Neither of them want it, clearly, but Pear is just too scared and dismayed at this point to imagine an alternative; in this moment, it must seem as though her whole world is falling apart right from under her very hooves. And it certainly seems that way to us as well. Love Always Finds a Way And so it's left up to Bright Mac to open another door for her, to keep the possibility of them and the beautiful things their being together might lead to alive. It's ultimately up to her to say yes, but he has to take a huge leap of faith, the biggest leap of faith he's ever taken or possibly will ever take in his life, to give her the opportunity to say yes. It can't be easy. He has to secretly arrange with his best friend, his love's best friend, and Ponyville's mayor itself everything needed. They have to somehow get just enough onto the border between the Apple and Pear's properties for a proper ceremony, and even a small celebration afterward. All this without their families or the love of his life even knowing. And yet he somehow does it, and then his carefulness is rewarded in getting to show it to her. Everything he's done, all of it for her, for them, for what they could have, believing in his heart and soul that it's worth fighting for and taking the biggest chances in their lives for. Confronted with all of that, reminded how much he loves her and she loves him, her belief is rekindled again almost immediately and right then and there, Buttercup and Bright Mac choose to get married. They don't need it to be a town event or an affair planned months in advance; in this moment it is perfect, as perfect as any love story could be, especially for them. We already can see, the second she says yes, how much safer and reassured she already feels; in her heart too, you simply know that she knows this is right, that this is what they're supposed to both have. Exchanging and burying an apple tree and pear tree seed with each other, they prepare to say their vows... But tragedy won't leave well enough alone. Their parents find them and for the first time, even though there's been plenty of evidence in front of them through the years, are confronted with the notion that their two children love each other. Even after their children tell them exactly how it is, finish saying their vows, and take their first true kiss as husband and wife, they're still too blinded by their mutual hatred to care. They assume that their kids are being stupid and foolish or simply trying to hurt them. They can't even consider the possibility that their children are acting more of the adult than they are. That all changes, however, when Buttercup says one single sentence. "But... the Apples are my family now too." That's when something clicks for one and snaps for the other. You look at Granny Smith's face, and she's shocked. A Pear has just said that the Apples are her family. Her. Family. Something happens in the older mare at that moment. A revelation, and suddenly you just know that their love, the beauty of it, its sincerity and the possibility it promises sweeps over her like a flood. For a moment she's genuinely too shocked to do anything. But on the other side something far worse happens in her father. He feels betrayal, from his only daughter (probably his only child) no less. Still blinded by his hatred of the Apples, he thinks his own daughter is disowning her family; in reality, she's asking him to be a part of another now as she is. He just can't see that, though, he simply cannot. So instead he lays down an ultimatum, a terrible one. Be an Apple or be a Pear: you can't be both, not in my eyes, and if you're not a Pear you're not my daughter anymore. It's the worst choice a father could present to his daughter in this moment, one Pear Butter should never have had to make. But she knows what's right, even if he can't, and even though she'd rather not have to make the choice at all, she knows she must remain true to the love that has guided her all of her life. There's so much at risk, but she believes in too much in the good and beauty that could come out of her and Bright Mac's love to say no. So she makes the choice. Grand Pear leaves in a rage. And as the disowned daughter weeps into her husband's shoulder, the first fruit of their love is born: Granny Smith comes over and extends a hoof and a smile to her. She accepts a new daughter into her life and family, and Buttercup in turn gains a mother and a new family. Although there is sadness this night, love is already overcoming it, overcoming the ugliness of years of Apples and Pears feuding with one another. Love continues its work through the years. Bright Mac and Buttercup settle down, Granny embraces her new daughter-in-law, and together they build a beautiful life and family together. Through the years Buttercup embraces being an Apple, leaving behind her old life as a Pear; we don't know much about this part, but I can't imagine it's out of hatred. Most likely it's just too sad for her thinking of her old life, of the family that left her behind. But as long as she has Bright and her new family, she is content, part of something intrinsically beautiful and special as could be. They go from being husband and wife to, eventually, father and mother as well, bearing three beautiful children together. They raise their children as best as they know how, with the entire Apple Family's love supporting them along the way as well. Life is as it should be: with their love, their family, their work, their friends and home and community, Bright Mac and Buttercup are set, having everything they could possibly ever want. The beauty and goodness stemming from their love continues to unfold more and more each and every day, until it's as normal to them and their family as the apples they grow. Then... then one day, they're gone. We don't know how. We don't know when. Based on our best guesses from what we've seen in the show, it was some time ago; Big Mac was probably somewhere around 12 or 13, Applejack anywhere from 8 to 10, and Apple Bloom may have been at most a toddler, but possibly still a young foal with barely any memories even of her parents. We'll probably never learn how it happened, and that's OK, I don't think we need to. It doesn't matter how, it doesn't even matter that it happened, really. Because as sad as it is, as terrible as their absence is in this show, as horrible as the loss must have been for their families and for their children especially, the most important thing is the beauty and good they brought into the world by taking their leap of love together. By believing in it and each other so strongly that it could not be denied. They may be gone, we may never even see more of them in the show again (though I certainly wouldn't complain if we did in more flashbacks or flashback episodes even), but they're not really gone. Everything that the Apples are in this show, especially their children, is a testament to who they were and how they lived their lives. We've seen this throughout the show, the wonderful thing that the Apple Family is for both Ponyville and across all of Equestria, and we now know what an important part in that family that Bright McIntosh and Pear Butter played. All because they believed in their love and the possibilities of it. That legacy has been there from the start of the show, even if the writers themselves didn't envision this story arc at the time, and in this episode we see it at work once more in a truly beautiful way, healing something that Buttercup and Bright Mac probably hoped ever since they got married would heal some day. It's the arc that ties this entire episode together, that gets the Apple siblings learning all of this about their parents and the beautiful love that they had together in the first place. And it's the final triumph of Bright Mac and Buttercup's love over the tragedy of the Apple Family and Pear Family feud. The Legacy of Love: Old Wounds Mended, Scars Left Behind, But Love Emerges From Tragedy An old stallion shows up in the Ponyville market one day, unannounced, just there to seemingly sell his wares. We're not even sure what his plans are, how long he really plans on staying. How long it took him to come here, to come back home. We're told he has a famous shop in Vanhoover, but this does not appear to be a businessman in his prime. He doesn't seem to care much about money anymore, or competition, or being the best; he just seems to enjoy selling his pear jam to others who seem to enjoy it. Maybe he's remembered that over the years, why he enjoyed growing and selling pears in the first place: because it made his friends and neighbors happy, and made him happy in turn. He seems gentler for it now, wiser and quieter. Then he spies a young filly. And he must know who she is. Perhaps he's seen a picture before, perhaps simply read about her. Or maybe... just maybe it's the fact that this filly is the spitting image of the stallion he hated for so many years for marrying his daughter, "stealing" her away from him. Whatever the case, he knows... it's his youngest granddaughter, asking him about his pear jam. He can't say anything, not yet. It's taken him long enough to muster up the courage to come here after all these years. So he starts by extending a small kindness to his youngest granddaughter with a gift of his pear jam; it's the first gift he's ever given to any of his grandchildren, the first endorsement he's ever given to his daughter's marriage and the life she built, the first time he's ever involved himself in the family they built. And it's with something he's loved making all of his life, but finally remembered why he loved doing it; because he loves sharing the thing he loves with others, especially his family. For now, that's enough for him. It quickly becomes not enough for the Apple siblings, though. Taken aback by the kindness of somepony they've always been told is in a feud with their family for unknown reasons, they do what their parents would have taught them to do, what they've grown up for as they've gotten older: they seek to find answers, initially because they hope they might end the feud. As they speak to first family, and later friends of their parents they never even knew about, they learn a story about their parents they weren't even seeking at first. They learn about their love, how strong it was, ways they take after their parents they didn't know about that played a part in their own story, how their parents love and devotion to one another left such a positive impact on their family and the friends their parents had in life. In the process, they gain new stories and memories of their parents to take to heart, pieces of them they never had and never got the chance to learn about, treasures they'll hold onto forever; you can see it in their eyes as they learn more and more, how special this all is to them, ponies who don't ask for much out of life to begin with and yet at this point cannot get enough of all of this. What's more, they grow closer to friends of their parents in Burnt Oak and Mrs. Cake, ponies they now know who have wonderful stories to tell them about the way they lived their lives. I hope going forward that the Apple siblings keep getting closer to these two; it'd be a wonderful character development to see unfold, a way for them to get closer indirectly to their own parents, and a way for Bright Mac and Buttercup's love and its legacy to live on in both their friends and children. And of course, they learn about the hurt that was never fully healed. About their grandfather, and what he did, the terrible, terrible mistake he made. After all these years, they'd be well in their right never to talk to him again. Nopony would really blame them if they chose not to. But that's not what they do, because they're their parents' children. Because they are the most precious, important legacy of Bright Mac and Buttercup's left behind by them, and they've been raised their whole lives to embody that love. They hold in their hearts a love that believes in possibility as much as their parents did with each other so long ago, and as long as they can believe in the possibilities of unconditional love, then they can find it in themselves to not shun their grandfather or hate him... but rather, to do what his daughter and her husband always wanted to do. Forgive him and welcome him back into their lives, now that he's ready to be a part of it. So they go off to find him, which doesn't take long at all in their small little town. When they find him, he looks tired. Maybe even a bit lost, like he's not sure now why he's here, if he can do what he came here to do in the first place. He couldn't have known he'd never see her again. He couldn't have known that the last words he'd said to his daughter would be words said in anger. He couldn't have known that he'd never get to share in the life she led with her husband, that he'd never get to see her as a wife and a mother. He has to have hated himself for a very long time for this. Then a tiny voice calls out as he's closing up his shop, and then there they are... his three grandchildren. Even his old eyes can see that. The big one that looks just like the boy he hated for so long if he were red as an apple, but with his mother's shade of mane and her freckles too; the middle one, probably close to if not around the age that Pear Butter was the last time he saw her, grown into a fine young filly herself with the best of her mother and father in her, a true leader; and the littlest one, a spitting image of her father but as sweet and gentle as her mother was, who probably never got to know either of them that well and has needed her siblings and her grandmother most of her life to be her parents. He's probably thought for years about what he'd say to them in this moment, but he couldn't have fathomed how hard it really would be. Words he's probably practiced in front of the mirror time and again all fall by the wayside, and in the moment all he can muster is a tearful "I'm... so sorry. I-I-I was just so angry, but I never..." It's the hardest thing he's ever had to do, but to his disbelief, not a second later his grandchildren are already embracing him. And just like that, he's home. The love of his grandchildren, the love that Bright Mac and Buttercup always had and believed in, it's all suddenly washing over him as it did Granny Smith on that fateful night so long ago, and it feels so good. Better than he could ever have imagined. He has another family now, as his daughter always wanted him too, and even though the sadness of the mistakes he made will never really be gone, will always leave scars, that's all they are now, scars. They're no longer the festering wounds that they were, and Bright Mac and Buttercup's love has finally healed the greatest, most terrible wound left behind by the Apple Family and Pear Family feud. As the Apple siblings bring their grandfather home to make amends with their grandmother, the two old farm ponies finally bury the hatchet and accept what their children always wanted them to: the possibility of loving each other and having one another as family. Reunited at long last, the family of Pears and Apples congregate in a tearful reunion years in the making beneath the branches of the physical embodiment and legacy of Bright Mac and Pear Butter's true love for one another: the intertwined apple and pear trees, sprouted from their apple tree and pear tree seeds planted so many years ago as their vows to one another, a perfect tribute to the beauty and goodness their love left in the world. These are the miracles of love. These are the wondrous things it can work. In an imperfect world, love is never easy, even at its strongest. But it is always worth it, because the good it can bring into the world and work into others' lives, whether it be with friends, family, or the love of your life, is always precious and priceless in comparison to any other alternative. One does not even need particularly remarkable circumstances to bring remarkable love into the world; one simply has to believe in that love strong enough, and the possibilities of it, to work something miraculous through it that only they can. This episode perfectly understands and conveys this as many, many, many other fictional properties, many with bigger budgets or resources throw at them, have failed to do, even if that was their intent. It's a remarkable piece of television, and it will probably always remain my favorite episode of My Little Pony. I am blessed enough, in this moment, to be courting a young woman myself, a friend from my own childhood; so much of what I saw in Bright Mac and Buttercup's courtship reminded me of the love and wonderful moments we have gotten to share with one another, and this episode left me hoping so hard that we are able to bring beauty and good into the world through our love as Bright Mac and Buttercup did. I know many other friends who, under different circumstances, have been touched by this episode as well; some who have gotten even further along in love with others, some who very much hope to be blessed with a true love like Bright Mac and Pear Butter had in each other, and some who even have not just taken part in such a beautiful, wonderful love like those two had, but have also known the hurt of losing the one they loved, a hurt all too similar to what the Apples and Pears experienced in losing Pear Butter and Bright Mac. Yet, just as Bright Mac and Buttercup would never trade any bit of their love for one more minute of life, just as they had no regrets for their love and all the good it did despite all the hurt they went through, just as all who loved them and cared about them, despite their sadness at their loss, feel overwhelming joy, happiness, and love recalling how wonderful they were, those friends of mine too don't regret one minute of the love they shared with their own true loves. They too in loving one another brought immeasurable good, love, and beauty into the world, and the fact that this episode can capture the truth and beauty of these acts that so many have shared in in real life, that is what makes it, for me, stand head and shoulders above so many works of fiction in general, and every episode of MLP. To those responsible for making it, thank you again. I can't wait to show it to my beloved Julianna next week, and maybe, just maybe someday I'll get to show it to children of my own as I teach them about what beauty and good true love can bring into the world. Miscellaneous Notes -Despite this episode being a little light on the laughs (not in a bad way, mind you, the episode was very intent in its approaching its subject matter with seriousness, care, respect, and gentleness even, with only some lighthearted laughs here and there), I got a huge laugh at the beginning from Granny Smith's line about praline obviously being a better topping on apple-fritter-flapjacks than caramel syrup. Also, as a quick aside, this show always manages to get me in the mood for pancakes whenever they show up; I don't know why, but among any of the food they show, the pancakes always look especially delicious! -This episode made me really want to see the Apple siblings doing more together. I mean, I know they've always been staples of the show, but here we got to see a side of all three of them we rarely have, and it was a delight. They all had great reactions throughout the episode as they learned more and more about their parents, and I would love to see long term impacts on all three of them as a result of this episode, like Big Mac spending more time with Burnt Oak, or Applejack or Apple Bloom getting closer to Mrs. Cake since she was such a good friend of their mom. And of course, obviously it would be wonderful to see more of Grand Pear, but I don't know how much we can expect since he was voice by William Shatner; either they'd have to get him for more jobs (which isn't impossible considering John de Lancie still regularly does work as Discord), or they'd have to find a voice actor who can do a good impression of his Grand Pear voice (certainly not impossible either, though hardly ideal). -Another notable laugh, possibly the best in the whole episode, came when we were first introduced to Burnt Oak. He was obviously designed to bear a striking resemblance to Sam Elliott, and clearly somebody took notice of this and just had to take advantage of it considering we already have a pony based on the Dude. So what did they do? They introduced Burnt Oak waving goodbye to The Dude pony as he walks away with a cart full of rugs!!! THAT. IS. SO. PERFECT. You could even say it ties the whole episode together. While I know it's possible that this was written into the episode, considering no dialogue was devoted to it, I would venture a guess that the storyboard artists were responsible for this purely visual gag, so props to Kaylee Chard, Jae Harm, and any other storyboard artists who worked with them on it (unless of course I'm completely wrong and it was written into the script by the writers themselves). -Our special guest stars Felicia Day and William Shatner both deserve praise for their roles as Pear Butter and Grand Pear. Felicia gave us a very well-developed personality in Pear Butter with not too many lines to work with, and little things like Pear Butter's occasional voice cracks or her very grounded personality made her an instantly lovable character. And of course I cannot praise her vocals in "You're In My Head Like a Catchy Song" enough, simply sublime. William Shatner did an equally impressive job with Grand Pear, and I was especially blown away by the fact that he was able to create distinct voices for Grand Pear at three different periods in his life (young adult Grand Pear, middle-aged Grand Pear, and elderly Grand Pear) as well as by the emotion he injected into the role, especially in Grand Pear's finally reuniting with his grandchildren and begging their forgiveness. Bill Newton did a great job as Bright McIntosh as well, and I would certainly love to see him reprise the role at some point. Top notch job from all three of you, and I for one certainly will not complain if they return to these roles in the show at any point. -Speaking of impressive voice acting jobs, let's give a hand to Tabitha St. Germain and Peter New. Tabitha of course killed it as Granny Smith and Mrs. Cake in the present day (also, I did not know until after watching this episode that Tabitha has always voiced Mrs. Cake, so let's just chalk that up to the seemingly never ending list of characters she seems to voice in this show), but like William Shatner, she had to voice characters at different periods in their lives, only she had to do so for two different characters. Her young adult Granny Smith voice was adorable, and I could even hear a tad bit of Applejack in there, and there were even subtle differences between her middle-aged Granny Smith and elderly Granny Smith. Same goes for Mrs. Cake, her younger and older selves somehow sounded a tad different, but not too much. Peter New, of course, did great as Big Mac (I very much appreciated that Big Mac was talking more here, it helped hit home how much this all meant to the Apple siblings), but I also forgot he voices Goldie Delicious, and that voice of his is hilarious! Goldie was a delight to see again, but he even managed to add some fairly heavy emotional moments to a character who has largely been used for laughs the couple of times she's appeared. A hand goes out to Cathy Weseluck too as young adult Mayor Mare and older Mayor Mare, though she had considerably less to do since her character was only in one scene. -Excellent callbacks to Season 1's "Over a Barrel" when Applejack both read a bedtime story to her tree Bloomberg and tucked him into bed. She clearly picked up reading bedtime stories to apple trees from Granny Smith, but apparently she somehow picked up covering them in blankets as well from Grand Pear somehow. While it's most likely that either Granny Smith or, even more likely, her mother Buttercup taught her that trick, I like to think it was genetic and just passed down to her from her grandpa. There were a couple of other excellent continuities in canon in repeatedly seeing the moon with Nightmare Moon still in it in the flashback's to Bright Mac and Buttercup's courtship, or Mayor Mare still sporting her pink mane when she was younger (callback's dating all the way back to the very first episode of the show and Season 2's "Ponyville Confidential, respectively). -Learning things the Apple siblings got from their parents was a real treat, even stuff that went unsaid. Things like where some of their physical features come from (Big Mac's mane and tail are colored just like his mom's, Applejack and Big Mac both have freckles just like she did, Apple Bloom has the exact mane/tail and coat colors as her father did, Applejack getting her hat from her father, etc.); learning that Bright Mac was honest just like Applejack; the fact that Buttercup had a talent for helping friends like Mrs. Cake figure out what they were good at just like Apple Bloom does with the Cutie Mark Crusaders; or the fact that Buttercup didn't like drawing attention to herself and keeping things low key just like Big McIntosh, were all wonderful things to learn. I guess we don't know if Bright Mac could or couldn't sing (he definitely couldn't play the guitar though), but it seems as though all three Apple siblings got their great singing voices from their mother, and Applejack most definitely learned how to play the guitar from her. But thankfully as well, the episode did not fall into the trap of doing nothing but showing how their parents were just like the Apple siblings; that's a bit of a cliche and it wouldn't have made for nearly as interesting an episode as one where we got to see their parents as interesting, unique, wonderful characters in and of themselves, not just carbon copies of their children. -Daniel Ingram deserves extra praise for the music as a whole in this episode, not just "You're In My Head Like a Catchy Song." All of the music did a great job of helping tell the story, and the manner in which it was utilized in scenes such as when the Apple siblings reunite with their grandfather helped make those scenes all the more emotional and powerful. Wonderful job, sir, truly wonderful. -Young Goldie Delicious briefly appears in one of the early flashbacks at one point, which is a super cool detail to fit in there. Also, is it just me, or does Burnt Oak bear more than a passing resemblance to Thunderlane? His young self really looked a lot like Thunderlane, and we do know Thunderlane is pretty bulky for a pegasus stallion, so it wouldn't surprise me if he had some earth pony blood. I'm very curious now as to whether or not they're related, possibly even father and son. -Cloud Kicker and Alula can be seen together in the background very briefly in an early shot in the Ponyville market, which was a little detail I very much appreciated myself. There's a lot of fan canon out there in both art and fanfiction, drawn from what we've seen in the show itself, that speculates they're sisters, so seeing continuity like that was really cool. -Another detail I thought was super cool was that it seemed like, especially in the earlier flashbacks, most of the ponies in Ponyville were earth ponies. It could just be a coincidence, but I get the feeling it was a subtle detail. After all, Ponyville was founded by earth pony families like the Apples, so it wouldn't surprise me if early on in its history most of the first residents who came during its initial expansions were earth ponies in turn, and it diversified among the pony races more and more as it grew. One of the few non-earth ponies in the earliest flashback was, of all things, Dinky, which implies one of two things: (1) either it was a silly oversight, or (2) they're implying that she is both Derpy and Time Turner's daughter, and that on top of that she may be doing some time travelling with Time Turner. Suffice to say, I like scenario #2 better. -I would love to hear how everyone else felt about or was impacted by this episode. Obviously plenty of you have already shared your thoughts in the episode's thread or your own blogs, but feel free to share any others here. It's an episode I'll certainly never get tired talking about. That's all I've got for ya'll this time, everypony, and thank you all for taking the time to read my most special edition ever of "Batbrony Reviews." Until next time, this is Batbrony signing off. I'm off!!! *cue dramatic exit*
  7. This is my return to fic writing. First chapter is a little short until I get into a rhythm and get to flesh out the material a bit more. This fic is about Applejack taking business classes to help improve the farm. It's gonna be an educational comedy. So here's Chapter 1, hope you enjoy! Chapter 1: It’s Business, It’s Business Time It was a blustery winter day at Sweet Apple Acres with the wind howling through the bare apple trees. In the kitchen sat Granny Smith and Applejack. A collection of Sweet Apple Acres’ sales reports were spread out on the table before them. Granny Smith rubbed her chin quizzically while glancing over a scroll entitled “Zap Apple Jam Sales and Revenues.” Applejack was pacing the kitchen floor awaiting Granny Smith’s analysis. Applejack was not one for numbers and annually relinquished the duties of reviewing the fancy mathematics to Granny Smith. After taking a sip of apple cinnamon tea, Granny Smith was ready to provide her business commentary. “Well dearie, I don’t know how to put this but we’re flank deep in the latrine! Our sales weren’t too hot this year I’m afraid.” “What do you reckon was the problem, Granny?” asked Applejack with concern in her voice. Granny Smith put the scroll down on the table and turned to Applejack. “If I were a bettin’ mare, which I was back in the day mind you...” Applejack rolled her eyes, “Yes, yes, we all know about your glory days when you… “Bankrupted Las Pegasus in a single night with only five bits and an unhealthy love for pegasus racing,” said Granny Smith and Applejack simultaneously. Granny Smith continued, “That’s right! And it would’ve been two nights of winnin’ too if the mayor of Las Pegasus didn’t have me kicked out! No respect for high rollers I tells ya!” “Get to the point, Granny!” Applejack barked. Granny Smith settled back down. “If I were a bettin’ mare, I’d reckon to say that we failed to promote the farm. We gotta advertise! Ponies these days ain’t satisfied with just a good apple cider or a good jar of jam, they want some personality! Some moxie!” Applejack looked upward in thought, “Well how do we go about doin’ that?” “I don’t know, that’s above my pay grade hehehe.” Applejack became confused. “Your what?” “Ahh forget it sugarcube, it’s a business joke.” At that moment, Granny Smith’s face lit up as if she reached a great epiphany. “Business! You can take some business courses down at city hall to help the farm!” Applejack immediately showed her disapproval. “Me? Takin’ business classes? I don’t know the first thing about business except that we make food and such for the citizens and they give us bits for it!” Granny Smith walked over to Applejack and gave her a pat on the back. “I know you can do it! Besides, I’m too old, Big Macintosh is the muscle, and Apple Bloom isn’t even graduated from elementary yet. If you put your nose to the grindstone, you can become the next Donald Grump!” “Donald who?” asked Applejack. “Donald Grump, the billionaire donkey. He’s a real mule and his hairdo don’t look too right, but he’s got bits flowin’ out the wazoo!” “Sounds like he should see a doctor…” “I know you can do it Applejack, I believe in ya’!” said Granny Smith with a confident smile. Applejack paused to think about Granny’s idea. She wondered if she could really take classes and learn enough concepts to improve the farm. In her wonderment, Applejack also pictured a mile long line of hungry ponies in front of Sweet Apple Acres, happily depositing their bits in exchange for delicious apple goods. Her mind wandered towards a fantastical setting where she was swimming in a pool of bits, Granny Smith hitting a jackpot on a slot machine with bits flowing out the chute and Big Macintosh and Apple Bloom making snow angels in a giant bit pile. A smile slowly formed from Applejack’s mouth. “Alright Granny, I’ll do it! I’ll do my best and use my learnin’ to improve Sweet Apple Acres!” “That’s my girl!” Granny Smith and Applejack shared a warm embrace before Applejack trotted out of the room to plan out her next steps. Applejack decided that she would head to city hall in the morning and sign up for classes. She didn’t know what to expect and would build up some anxiety when she pondered deeper. The anxiety would subside however when she reverted back to her previous fantasy of her family playing in the piles of bits they would make thanks to her expanded business knowledge. Applejack went to bed, enthusiastic for the day ahead and for the start of her journey as a new businessmare.
  8. It's been a month since I've started doing a daily drawing. And Oh Boy, it's been a blast. I didn't liked it at first, but little by little I think I became better... Maybe. It all started with this "thing" which I didn't take too seriously, but it was my first pony in a while. Close to 5 years without even touching a pen to draw. It hurted. Then I did this. I like this style better. It reminds me about those old joke magazines like MAD. I tried to replicate the last drawing's style, but didn't work. Her face is derpy without the cute. I actually like this Octavia, but i have to admit, the lightning doesn't make sense. It's a problem I'm struggle with even today, but sooner or later I'll overcome such flaws. Aaand, here I began to make those horrible intrusive text highlights. They take a lot of space and later when it's not 22 days anymore, it became useless. With this one I took a little risk. I like the colors, but they're oversaturated. Here's when I tried to do a background that wasn't just clouds or two colors. I didn't detailed that much, but I liked it when I did it. Today, not so much, but I kinda have respect to it.Was the first time that I tried to do a good shading... "good" xD well, it's not that bad. With this one, I tried an old, OLD comic book style which I didn't know how to do. It turned out decent, but it's nothing compared with other styles. I kinda like it even today though. This Luna brings me issues. I liked the concept, but the final results are... Special. The perspective is so messy, oh goodness. This I don't like. Not at all. Moving on! This was the first one that I really liked how it turned out. I like the highlights, the background is okay, and the lineart is charming. It was the best I did since the beginning imo. Besides, Dashie with Tank is an idea that I'd love to do more often. This was the time that I've started to do certain things, like the mane style, the shadows and highlights, and more "dynamic" poses. They're still stiffy, but here I noticed that I was improving after a long time. ... And I watch this one, and I laugh. Oh god, look at the expression, the proportions, the background! I thought it was ok, but now I realize that it wasn't that good as I expected xD It's not terrible, and it's better than the others, but still, it's not as good as the next ones, thankfully. That's a good sign. I like to mess with the ways of doing the magic effect. This one is... weird. The style is weird, the expressions are weird, and even the shading is. I kinda, sorta, maybe like it, but I feel ashamed every time I look at it well, it was more than 2 weeks ago. I think I've improved. Maybe. Now, this is one of my personal favourites. This is when I really liked how it was turning out, and I can't find any major flaws besides Luna's face. But even still, I think it's funny and doesn't ruin the whole image. Here's when my shading started to look good. I mess up sometimes, but I've learned my lesson since the Crusaders one. Oh geez... Welp, this was the image when all my mane styles started to be like silk... Not really, but I love Celestia's. And this one... I messed up with the shading in a couple of ponys, specially in Rarity, but I LOVE the feeling I receive from it. It reminds me about those promotional posters from movie theaters. And I love how Sunset, Pinkie, Starlight and Twilight look. With this one I tried to do a "good" background, but... Well, it's not that bad, but the pony proportions are messy, and the color is oversaturated again. I try to improve that even today. Keep it light and smooth, Eifie. Don't over do it. This one was simple. Notice the sense of movement and the way the ponys point to the next part of the text like they're dancing. They point to each other in a way, and I think it's fun. I really like to do Pinkie's mane, it's so messy and weird Even when I like the Fluttercord idea, I don't really like this one that much. The background is weird, and I could do the characters better. even though, I like the feeling it emanates. what I enjoy the most are Discord's wings. This one was fun to do. I love the Crusaders, and I enjoy doing them whenever I can. Even if the "18 days" image was just... Ugh. It's my least favourite. But this one redeemes that, right? (Redeemes? That's how you spell it? English is not my mother language, so don't mind me D: ). Oh my. The Apple-Pie family is tricky, but certainly fun. My thing is doing portrait drawings, and the style is weird but charming to me, haha! (Marble's mane is my favourite. Maud's expression is priceless.). And this one right there is special. Why? It was the first one that I send to Equestria Daily. And it was published. I won't lie to you, I was happy the rest of the day after I noticed that. Then Sethisto started to notice my drawings, and ever since many more of them were published on the page. I'm truly glad of that. I'm willing to do so much more because I have a little more feedback. The brony community is the best. Oh, and another one following the trend of the "13 days" one. Notice how now they're more balanced. Now is Twilight who has her eyes open, and the rest has them closed. She really is the princess of friendship, and I'd love to do more tributes about this fact. Kinda reminds me about the PPG. I think this one is my favourite. The shading is the best 've done in my opinion, and the message is fun. Celestia is used to be captured, so we don't have to worry. Some magical thing will save the day at the end of the afternoon. Should i say i really like the manes? This has a special place in my heart. Ember looks good, and the lightning is divine. (Sounds bad when it's my own drawing. I'm sorry! ) This one is a close second because the colors. This one is charming, and it's okay, but not of my favourites. I think I messed un a bit with the background, and the proportions are a little bit off. And Oh MY, what happenned to Sunburst's beard? That's not right! Besides Starlight's magic is light blue. Whoops. (Oh, you noticed the tea cup? Trixie approves. And the prediction came true, Spike and her shared a moment in the season premiere!). This was fun to do, but MY GOODNESS it take a lot of time, and it isn't even that great. The shading could be better, but that happens when you're on a schedule and try to do so many characters. Don't do that, people! Outside that, it's fun to watch and the illustration looks okay. This was the last one. Was the day before the season premiere, and I couldn't be happier. Notice how I get rid of the intrusive text since the "7 days left" one. I'm so glad about it. The countdown remains in the title, not in the image. And here's some others before and after the episode. The "meme" ones are too fun. I'll do some more this week. The title of this one is "Hiatus was just a nightmare, everypony!". It was published before the episodes aired. Those ones, you know. I hope you like watching them as I love doing them! Twitter! Follow me on dA for more!
  9. There's something about the concept of sharing traditions that drives me to think how wonderful differences are. We don't see the world on the same way; each one of us have our motivations, experiences and dreams to accomplish. We want to share our own perspective with the world, and also want to see what others have to offer. That's one of the bases of fandoms, expand what we think we know and learn about different ways to see one particular thing. To make it work, we have to learn how to listen, and try to understand why other person thinks differently than you, and be grateful that this idea can be not only spoken, but heard. Season 5 episode "Heartbreakers" portraits this idea wonderfully. It's not perfect, but goes well with the standards of the show. I enjoy seeing Pinkie Pie and Applejack interact like the knew each other for years. I mean, like a childhood best friend. It's heartwarming, and anyone with that one friend can relate. The are almost opposites in personality sometimes, but also share a lot in common, particularly the silly sense of humor. If you want Pinkie to be your best friend, just go along with that. The pies are also unique and interesting. The 4 sisters are three extremes and a neutral centerpoint in the spectrum of emotions. Limestone is anger, Marble is timidness, Pinkie is joy, and Maud is... Maud. It's a clever way to make a character. I'd love to see them around on season 7. A family related episode is always welcome to my list of personal favourites. Bring me the Pie and the Maud, gud sir. Twitter! deviantArt!
  10. Awwwwww yeah, this older brother LOVES him some good ol' fashioned sibling rivalry! Good morning everypony, and welcome back to another edition of "Batbrony Reviews." I'm very happy to say that this morning's episode was surprisingly delightful! Not that I thought, going into "Where the Apple Lies," that it would be bad or anything, just that I didn't really have any expectations for this episode and so wasn't sure what to expect. What we got was something very new, which is quite surprising for a Mane 6 character at this point in the show, ESPECIALLY one as consistent in her characterization as Applejack usually is. Going forward, I would love to see more episodes like this one (more on that later), but for now let's delve into today's episode: this is "Where the Apple Lies." So as I said before, this was an episode unlike most we've ever gotten for the Mane 6, with only a few parallels to it: a backstory episode. I can easily count on one hand the number of similar episodes we've had to this one, episodes like "The Cutie Mark Chronicles," but that episode was an ensemble episode that only gave us short flashbacks for each of the Mane 6. Likewise, we've had flashbacks in other episodes before back to when certain Mane 6 characters were younger, but again, they've never consisted of virtually the entire episode. So really, this was a first for the show: an episode largely devoted to a chapter from a single Mane 6 character's past. In that respect, it was very experimental for the show, and again, for a Mane 6 character that is very surprising at this point. After almost six full seasons of the show, it's obviously getting increasingly hard to find new things or stories to tell with the main characters just because they've learned so many lessons at this point. Frankly Granny Smith's lucky she didn't end up in the hospital for other reasons this ep One obvious solution then to this dilemma? Make more episodes like this one, episodes which delve into the pasts and history of the Mane 6 and also give the writers and animators a chance to show us Ponyville and Equestria in a very different light. In today's episode alone, we got to see a preteen/early teenager Applejack, a teenage and VERY talkative Big Mac (which was both hilarious and bizarre to watch), Granny Smith when she was pretty much raising those two at a much younger age (I assume that either Apple Bloom was an infant OR their parents were out of town at the time and she hadn't been born yet, though the episode did not address that question), a much younger Filthy Rich WITH his fiance of the time, Spoiled Milk (BTW that name is too perfect for her), and many more fun little bits of Ponyville at a different time. A personal favorite cameo of mine was when we caught a glimpse of a presumably teenage Derpy (she had a similar body build it seemed to AJ's) at the hospital speaking with a doctor or nurse with bandages covering her eyes, implying that some type of corrective eye surgery had recently occurred at the time of this incident (a very interesting implication for backstory for a character who obviously hasn't gotten much, being a background pony and all). So obviously, with the rich abundance of new things this episode offered to viewers (and the makers of this episode in getting to put it together), it's clear that we should want (and possibly expect) more episodes like this in the future. They will give us a chance to see old characters who we've become so familiar with at this point in a new light, as well as characters around them, including family members we maybe haven't gotten to see as much from before. Who wouldn't love to see a young Twilight with her parents, Shining Armor, or Princess Celestia in her youth? How about more of a young Pinkie Pie on the rock farm OR better yet, when she first met the Cakes (we saw a young Mrs. Cake (though it was unknown if she was married yet at the time) in this episode after all)? A young Rarity and young Applejack in their youth, Fluttershy when she first moved to Ponyville, young Fluttershy and Rainbow Dash growing up in Cloudsdale, there are simply a TON of opportunities presented by this format, so the fact that this episode was made should be very encouraging to all of us as viewers and imply that more episodes like this one may be coming in Season 7 (which we now know as of this week will for sure be made). I don't know about the rest of you, but after how delightful this episode turned out, I for one cannot wait to see more episodes like it next season and hope that the creators seriously consider making more like it! Huh, that... could actually explain how Spoiled Rich, dare I say it, actually looked *gulp* better in her youth I didn't even catch this one, but 80s Cheerilee? That's an AWESOME callback to Season 1!!! Awwwwwwwww, Derpy looks so cute and upbeat despite probably having just gone through a very scary procedure! That's my girl, that's how best background pony (and best pony in general) rolls! So how exactly did this episode unfold? Well, besides some of the delightful bits I mentioned already, we got to see both a hilarious and very entertaining episode which also managed to feel rather important since it highlighted a very important and formative part of Applejack's youth. Since the show has started, we've all known Applejack to be the most honest pony around; I mean, it is her Element of Harmony after all. Only on rare occasions have we seen her lie, and usually when she's been induced to in a magical sense by someone like Discord. This time, however, we got to see not only Applejack lying of her own volition, but also how said lying led her to value honesty so importantly. This episode-type is not new; cartoons which highlight the importance of honesty by showing white lies and fibs getting out of control have been done a whole lot before. It's not always easy to execute them well since they can get redundant, but it worked very well here for a couple of reasons; (1) it was Applejack doing the lying, so it felt very out of character for her, but since it was in her youth it made sense since, at the time, she didn't value honesty in the same way as she does now, and (2) it did the escalation aspect of this episode VERY well indeed. She found new ways to lie and fib, the lies and fibs got increasingly far-fetched and resulted in more and more extreme outcomes, which in turn meant that the episode only got more and more entertaining as it went on. This in turn also meant that, besides seeing Applejack lie, we also got to see a side of her we rarely do: panic-mode Applejack, and as a filly no less. With Big Mac and her constantly bickering as things got more and more out of control as well, as well as poor Granny Smith having no idea what was going on but remaining her usual ornery, cantankerous but also lovable self, as well as Filthy Rich and Spoiled Milk only causing more grief for Applejack as they kept forcing her into going to greater extremes to maintain her lies, this all made for a very fun, entertaining, and consequential episode. It really felt by the end like, yeah, this is something that would lead Applejack to truly value honesty as a core of who she is and what she does, after everything that happened here. I mean, her brother almost got amputated for crying out loud because of her lies! And what's more, it made sense in a way that she let it get out of hoof; for one, she was a teenager at the time, and they tend to buck up at life choices in certain respects, and she also thought that telling the truth would jeopardize her family's business and future well-being because she wasn't confident she could tell Filthy Rich the hard truth in the first place in a way that would maintain their business relations. For all we know, she and Big Mac were bickering so much about who was going to eventually run the Apple family business because their parents may have recently, at that time, passed away and now it was up to one of the Apple siblings to get ready to run Sweet Apple Acres. Behold, Applejack's "cat-coughing-up-a-hairball" impression! It's... well, it's accurate, I'll give it that So all in all, like I said, the mere fact that this episode was largely set in the past is what allowed it to be so balanced in terms of both having a valuable and consequential lesson taught as well as being so highly entertaining. Apple Bloom got to learn both the value of honesty as well as why it means so much to her older sister from AJ herself, we got to see a side of many characters we hadn't before and a conflict in a uniquely presented fashion, and most excitingly of all we now have a new type of episode for the show which I hope we will see more of in the coming season for other members of the Mane 6. Overall, "Where the Apple Lies" was a delightfully enjoyable surprise, one of the best of Season 6 in terms of how it so exceeded the few expectations I had for it in the first place, and I cannot wait to hopefully see more like it in the coming season (or seasons) of this show. That's all I have for you today everypony, until next time this is Batbrony signing off. I'm off!!! *cue dramatic exit*
  11. Hey all! So I've had this vector image lying about on my laptop for at least half a year, and I keep going back to it and editing here and there because I was never quite happy with it. To compress the deal, I think maybe I've reached a point where I'm decently happy with what I've got. This is the first time I've ever vectored over a screenshot, and also the first time I've really vectored something large in a while, so it was quite the harsh learning curve ^^' Could any experienced vectorers (?) or just general artsy people give me some critiques or pointers for next time? Thanks!
  12. Good afternoon, everypony, sorry I'm late! I'll try to keep this review short seeing as I have some errands and work I have to take care of, but boy oh boy do we have a lot to cover! Let's not waste anymore time and dive right in, this is "Hearthbreakers"! So what can't I say about this episode? Because seriously, there's a lot to say. We had a successor episode to both "Hearth's Warming Eve" and "Pinkie Apple Pie," we had the Apples spending the holidays with the Pies, we got to see the Pie family in the present for the very first time (not including Maud), and we got to see where they live and how they spend the holidays, as in, the very environment that Pinkie herself came from. On top of all of that, we had a very lovely message, if I do say so myself, one that really works fantastically for this show especially. So where to begin? Well I suppose we ought to start with Pinkie and Applejack first, seeing as they are the stars of this episode. They were great, both of them, really, they were. I really actually love seeing these two get to interact one-on-one with each other, at least since "Pinkie Apple Pie." Maybe it's cause they're earth ponies, maybe it's cause they both have far more simple, homey tastes and a deep love for things like family gatherings and such, there's just something very warm about Applejack and Pinkie Pie when they're around each other compared to some of the other characters. Applejack's the only character of the show who we've ever seen extensively with her entire family (Twilight and hers don't count seeing as her parents have yet to even speak in the show), and Pinkie Pie's referenced hers multiple times before this episode. So they definitely are far more similar than one might think. But it was really interesting seeing how the both of them were trying to make their holiday celebration with each other's families work. Applejack was thrown for a loop by how the Pie's traditions didn't meet her expectations (no surprise there, that's definitely a very AJ-reaction to have), but Pinkie Pie also made a mistake in assuming that AJ and her family would be completely comfortable with her family's traditions. It's an understandable error, really, and one that I'm guessing most of us can relate to. Different families have different traditions and different ways of celebrating holidays, that's almost as old as time itself. And it speaks to a bigger issue for people in general, that being that we're uncomfortable with the unfamiliar. It's a huge reason, when one thinks about it, that people have a hard time getting along with new people or different cultures, and some people are too critical of that reaction because I think all of us have a hard time dealing with the unfamiliar when we first encounter it. This episode shines because it both highlights that people, or rather, ponies have a hard time dealing with a different lifestyle, especially when it comes to something as precious as a holiday, but also doesn't judge either party for it. AJ was wrong for assuming they'd have the same traditions and then trying to have them celebrate entirely how she was used to, and Pinkie was wrong for assuming AJ and her family wouldn't be uncomfortable with this. They didn't just run from the problem (even though they almost did), but they reached a healthy compromise; in the end, neither set of traditions overruled the other, but both were shared with each other, and that is truly when traditions are most precious. Not just when they bring you and your loved ones joy, but when you're willing to share them with others and likewise let them share theirs with you. Heck, that's what a lot of new families have to deal with when a husband and wife share their traditions with each other! So yeah, great lesson here, great execution, and great rapport between Applejack and Pinkie Pie as the leads of the episode, I loved it very much. Next, let's talk about the Apples and the Pies. I don't have a whole lot to say about the Apples seeing as they're hardly new, but they were all totally fine. It was really fun getting to see them interact with the Pies, that's for sure. Granny Smith was a hoot with Igneous and Cloudy Quartz, Apple Bloom and Maud were surprisingly adorable together, and Big Mac got the BUCK shipped out of him with Marble Pie! I mean, holy cheese, they weren't even trying to hide it, someone at that studio wants to make this ship happen (much to the chagrin of CheeriMac shippers). I like CheeriMac myself, but I won't lie, these two were pretty cute together! Shipping: this is how it works See? Ya know, I wonder how that happened? We should totally ship mah brother with your sister!!! Huh, seems legit As for the Pies, I couldn't have hoped for anything better. I mean, holy cow, THAT FAMILY! Oh my goodness, that is totally the family that only a pony like Pinkie Pie could come from. You got Igneous Pie and Cloudy Quartz who are TOTALLY how they should be; the Amish dialect was predictable, but it killed me all the same. And ya know, they're super cool, I liked that. They're A-OK with who they are, but they clearly have no problem with their daughters being their own ponies either considering how different they all are from each other. It seems that Maud is the oldest of all of them (at least I think so), and ya know, she's really grown on me since her first appearance. In her first appearance, I thought her personality was obnoxious and blandness taken too far, but now, I really, really like her. Maybe part of it is that DHX seems to get that much of her personality that works is making a joke out of it, but IDK, I really, really like her at this point just as she is, can't really explain it. Anyway, she was great here, whether she was with Pinkie, Apple Bloom, Boulder, or "singing" more songs about rocks. Be you, Maud, be you. Limestone Pie (previously referred to by fans as Blinky Pie up to this point) was... scary. She seems to have a severe case of middle-child syndrome and is obsessed with her job as manager of the Pie's Rock Farm. It was a bit over-the-top at times, admittedly (though part of that might've been the voice, really), but for the most part she worked just fine and was entertaining to watch. I would've liked to see a bit more of her softer side, but who knows, maybe she'll feature in a Season 6 episode somewhere down the line. Seriously girl, you gotta calm down. It's like Maud stole all your chill and left none for you. Finally, we learned that apparently Pinkie Pie is a TWIN (at least, for all we know she could be a triplet or even quadruplet, but IDK, until that's confirmed she's at least a twin). Yup, apparently she's a fraternal twin with Marble Pie (previously referred to by fans as Inky Pie up to this point). And oh my, Marble Pie. This filly... is adorable. The Fluttershy is strong with this one She's basically the Pie Family version of Fluttershy, not even joking, but I couldn't help but want to see more of her! I don't know why, maybe it's because it's so bizarre a pony like this being in the Pie family, maybe it's just cause she's so cute, maybe it's because DHX kept blatantly trying to ship her with Big Mac (seriously, still not kidding about that, DO NOT be surprised to see that crop up in the future!). Whatever the reason, I need more of her (and her ship with Big Macintosh). Just kidding, just kidding. Though to address that, as multiple people have pointed out, if they are indeed related, they are pretty much as distant as cousins can possibly be, so it really wouldn't be awkward at all to ship them. Overall, the Pies were great as were the Apples, and I really hope we get to see more of Pinkie's family in the future. I need more MarbleMac, perpetually-angry Limestone, adventures of Apple Bloom and Maud, and Granny Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Pie have silly old-pony conversations. They share the same bed when they're all home, THAT IS SO CUTE!!! Besides all that, not much else to cover with this one. The timing was a bit wonky on this episode seeing as we're getting a Nightmare Night one NEXT BUCKING WEEK, but it was most definitely a worthy successor to "Hearth's Warming Eve" and lovely to see them return to that holiday. Twilight and Spike had a cute bit at the beginning, the animation was lovely as always, the humor was spot on, and I loved the Pie's Rock Farm and just how big the show's writers made it, it was very cool getting to see both how colorful it was (especially at the holidays) and how many diverse locations there were on it. I still have no bucking idea what you do at a rock farm, but eh, details. Finally, I would be remiss if I did not point out that DHX made a "Planes, Trains, and Automobiles" reference, as well as a "Home Alone" reference in the same scene, in the SAME... BUCKING... SHOT!!! That... is bucking amazing, and this episode is full of win for that alone! :comeatus: That's all I got for this week, everypony, see you all next Saturday when it'll be time for things to get SPOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOKKKKKKKYYYYYYY!!!!!! This is Batbrony, signing off. I'm off! *cue dramatic exit*
  13. Good morning everypony, and welcome back to yet another edition of "Batbrony Reviews." Well, I must say this week we had a very... unique episode. This is definitely one of those episodes that's in a category of its own, and in all the right ways, I must say. I don't have a whole lot to say about it since most of it was schtick and comedic gags, but that doesn't mean I didn't like it. Without further ado, this is "Brotherhooves Social." So let's start with the, surprisingly enough, star of this episode, Big Macintosh. I've always wanted to learn more about Big Mac and I love any time we see him; for starters, Peter New seems to have a blast in the role, but as for the character himself, Big Mac is pretty straightforward, but that makes it all the more fun to learn more about him. It's nice seeing in an episode like this that there's a little more to him than meets the eye, and I look forward to more supporting roles in the future for him (such as he had in "Filly Vanilli"). It'd be nice too to see some big, permanent changes for him in the future, such as perhaps something starting with him and Miss Cheerilee (who, as evidenced in "Filly Vanilli" seems definitely actually interested in him). It certainly wouldn't surprise me if something like that happened, seeing as the show more and more references events that have happened in the past, showing that there is definitely long-term continuity at this point. But anyways, back to the episode. Speaking as a big brother myself (although I don't have two siblings like Big Mac, just one little sis), I definitely empathized with a lot of what Big Mac was feeling here. There have definitely been times in our lives where I myself and my little sis were more distant than we should've been, but thankfully they didn't last. The lengths he was willing to go in order to make Apple Bloom happy were obviously not just hilarious, but also rather sweet, and very creative if I do say so myself, I swear, I think Big Mac's got a far wilder imagination than we might think. He got a bit carried away at the end there, but his real shining moment came in the final scene when he delivered a lengthy monologue that was actually perfectly executed, which is saying something considering it could've come across quite easily as forced. Not much else to say about him besides that, but all in all, Big Mac had a bang up episode in his first ever true starring role, and I for one really hope we get to see more and more of him in the future. Good job Big Mac, you're a good big brother, from one BBBFF to another. I won't lie, I cracked up when he did this too Yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh, touchdown!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I have far less to say about Apple Bloom, mostly because she was playing the same tune for most of this episode. She started out blissfully ignorant of Big Mac's discomfort, and then spent most of the episode worrying about him being discovered and her being embarrassed. It wasn't bad or anything, there just wasn't a whole lot of variation to it. She learned a good lesson at the end and was much closer to her brother for it, but really the one thing that stuck out most about AB here to me was just that Michelle Creber's voice is really starting to go through puberty (though not quite as much as Claire Corlett's, which actually has left Scootaloo sounding the similar to her Season 1 self of the three CMC, weird, right? ). Speaking of the other two CMC, they were fine as well, though Sweetie Belle just kinda suddenly disappeared from the episode. Scootaloo on the other hand was pretty cute tagging along with Rainbow Dash, and while we're on the subject, RD was pretty cool too going along with Big Mac's plan, yet another example of how she's not nearly as competitive as she used to be. Granny Smith was her funny, kooky old self, and AJ was fine for the bit she was in it. All in all, the supporting cast was just fine, if somewhat predictable in what they did. No, stahp it Twily, that's a bad, bad Princess of Friendship! *smacks with newspaper* You'll get another episode soon enough. Finally, since most of the episode was really just comedy (besides the more serious beginning and ending), guess I should mention that. Most the humor centered around Big Mac in drag, and while it was fairly predictable in that regard, it was also executed really well and quite funny for it. My favorite running gag in the whole episode was actually that stallion-judge who apparently didn't realize he was a stallion and kept eyeballing "Orchard Blossom," that was bucking funny. The reveal of "Orchard Blossom" was also one of those moments that had me nearly falling out of my seat, mostly because I had no bucking idea it was coming. And honestly, the whole concept itself could've been far more cringeworthy than it really was, but in execution it really just came off as silly, lighthearted fun and a sweet but very weird brotherly gesture from Big Mac. Animation was top notch as usual, the song was fairly nice but could've been a little sweeter if it wasn't being played for laughs, what with Big Mac's falsetto voice and all, and Big Mac's "Orchard Blossom" voice was to die for. Like I said before, this was a very one-of-a-kind episode that I doubt any other will resemble any time soon, and for what it was, it did pretty much everything it wanted to. It was funny when it needed to be, it was sweet when it needed to be, and it was a nice shout-out to all the big brothers of the world who might not be as close to their little sisters as they'd like to be. Fellow big bros, hold on tight to your little sises, always be there for them ready to be the best big bro you can be and having their back always, and if you haven't seen them in awhile, give them the biggest hugs you can the next time you do. That's all I got for this one, this is Batbrony signing off. I'm off! *cue dramatic exit*
  14. In winter wrap up ponyville is hndreds of years old, yet granny smith founded it. how old is she?
  15. Who is you're favorite member of the Apple Family? Mine is probably Apple Fritter
  16. HUB Welcome to the Apple Family fanclub! Big Macintosh Granny Smith Braeburn A few rules -While Applejack, Applebloom and Babs seed are in fact memebers of the Apple family since Applejack already has her own fanclub and Applebloom and Bab's Seed already a part of the Cutie Mark Crusaders fanclub this fanclub will focus mainly on the other members of the Apple Family. -Do not post a picture of Rainbow Dash in the Apple Family forum, because Rainbow Dash belongs in the Rainbow Dash forum. -No spamming post to become biggest fans -This is a children’s show, and believe it or not there are younger people who go on these forums, please limit content to suggestive only. For example you may post a picture of two ponies kissing, but they cannot be doing anything inappropriate, or showing things inappropriate. -Do not hate on another fan club -All of MLP Forums rules still apply. -Fan art is encouraged but all images with the exception of the cover image in this first post must have the proper spoiler tags. Large amounts of unspoilered images on a single page can often cause lag and nobody likes to deal with lag.
  17. Thanks for the suggestion last week to draw AJ. Any more suggestions from you guys would be much appreciated. Any tips on shading with colored pencils? Tell me what you think of them.
  18. I'm interested in a Granny Smith figure, but the only one I've seen has her leaning on a walker. Anyone know of others, including the young Granny Smith?
  19. Granny Smith Source of vast knowledge and wisdom. Aged and respected member of the Ponyville community. Beloved member of the prolific Apple Family. Stern talker-to of Zap Apple Jam jars. Geriatric comedian. And, believe it or not, she was young once! Post, fellow Granny Smith fans. POST AWAY! Note: for the variety of apple (not the pony), seek out the produce section of the nearest grocery store.
  20. Yes, it's true. Not what any of us saw coming, especially coming from the grandmother of the Element of Honesty, but it is true. Granny Smith is a filthy freaking liar. I didn't want to believe it, but the evidence is there. It's always been there, right under our collective noses. And it was placed there by the writers, as if to mock our shortsightedness, to make fun of our community's need to analyze everything. All those review shows, and no one ever noticed this simple fact. Where's your god now, Tommy Oliver? But now the shroud has been lifted, the Wizard has been revealed as a phony, there never was a Santa Claus, Bruce Willis was dead the whole time, the parrot has swung down the curtain and joined the choir invisible, the truth has been revealed. And what was the clue that led to this discovery, the key to the writer's ultimate masterpiece of revelation and cunning? It's simple, Greg: since it is now official that "a moon" is roughly equal to one month's worth of time, Granny's comment that it's been 100 moons since the last Apple family reunion in "Apple Family Reunion" means a little over 8 years passed between Twilight's arrival in Ponyville and "Apple Family Reunion." There are a few explanations for this, but only one is feasible. 1.) The writers don't are, which is obvi not true, emmiright? 2.) Equestria time is different than Earth time, which is a dumb argument. If that's what Meghan McCarthay meant, she would have said that. 3.) This statement is true and ponies just age really slow, which removes some of the mystique and wonder from a 1,000 year old being, doesn't it? 4.) Granny Smith is going senile. Realistic, but 2 real for me, bro. 5.) Granny Smith is a filthy liar. I'm much more comfortable with her being full of shit than going senile, so I choose to believe this reality and any argument to the contrary will be met with violence and hatred. Of course, it can not only be assumed that Granny Smith lying about this means she lies about everything else, including who really murdered the Apple parents, but that she is omnipotent. Think about it: who was that lie for? She ain't fooling the Apple siblings or anypony else, so she's lying just to annoy the audience with the lack of a consistent time frame. She broke the fourth wall just to torment us, and who knows what else she's capable of when angered. So watch out, mate.
  21. 3 page iTunes preview: http://mlp.derpynews.com/friends-forever-9-preview/ Due to be released on the 10th.
  22. Hi guys! Soooooo...I am EXTREMELY new to the Ponyverse, but I have a SERIOUS passion for music. Does anyone have any advice on how to get more involved in any musical projects? How to get involved more in my area (Orlando, FL)? Since I am new, I just thought there may be a forum, website, experienced Brony musician, etc. that may explain all of this somewhere. I am a singer/voice actor. Here is a snippet of my work...please listen all the way to the end as I do Applejack, Granny Smith, Apple Bloom, AND Pinkie Pie's voices in this video. It's a cover of "Apples to the Core." Would appreciate any help/advice anyone out there can give...good or bad! http://youtu.be/HtrisT-Ti28 Thanks in advance for the help! Tenacity
  23. "Apples to the Core" ALL VOICES cover
  24. In a scene from "Leap of Faith" (S04E20), Granny Smith, in her overconfidence, tries to break the Equestria high diving record by jumping from the highest diving board into a deep dish pie pan of water. Applejack, at the top of the high-diving platform, then throws a lasso around Granny Smith's hind legs and stops her just before she hits the ground by pulling Granny Smith back while holding the rope in her teeth. I think the physics of this scenario are a bit dubious, and I'll try to explain why below. First, it's extraordinarily fortunate that there's a rope at the top of the diving platform for Applejack to use, and furthermore, that it's just long enough to be able to reach Granny Smith, yet just short enough that it can be pulled taut to stop Granny Smith before she hits the ground. On top of this, in the period of time between Granny Smith jumping off the diving board and just before she hits the ground (a little under 6 seconds, by my observation), Applejack is somehow able to gasp in horror, grab the rope, tie it into a lasso, and throw it both quickly and accurately enough to catch up to Granny Smith far below (while overcoming air resistance) and wrap around her hind legs before she hits the ground. Finally, as @@Wingnut pointed out in the discussion topic for the episode, the rope acts strangely elastic for looking like an ordinary rope, stretching out the time over which Granny Smith is stopped and reducing the average force exerted to stop her. One aspect of this whole scenario that amazes me is that Applejack supposedly exerts the force necessary to stop Granny Smith's free fall by pulling back on the rope held between her teeth. So, below, I'll try to make a quick-and-dirty calculation of the average force required to stop Granny Smith's free fall before she hits the ground. If you don't want to read the details, feel free to skip to the FINAL RESULT AND IMPLICATIONS below. CALCULATIONS: In order to calculate the average force needed to stop Granny Smith's free fall, I'll first calculate the impulse, or change in momentum, which Granny Smith undergoes, then divide this by the time period over which she experiences this impulse. To calculate the impulse, we need Granny Smith's mass and velocity just before Applejack stops her. I don't know any good source for the weights of ponies in the world of Equestria, so I'll use a rough guess of 100 lb for Granny Smith's weight. To calculate Granny Smith's velocity just before Applejack stops her, I'll use this online calculator that finds free fall distance and velocity with air resistance. I'll use a mass of 45.36 kg (= 100 lb), and I observed a free fall time of 5.75 seconds between the apex of Granny Smith's leap off the diving board and the time at which the lasso around Granny Smith's hind legs first becomes taut. I'll use the calculator's given air resistance coefficient and gravitational acceleration, which I assume are the same in Equestria as they are on Earth. mass = m = 100 lb = 45.36 kg free fall time = 5.75 s free fall velocity (from online calculator) = vi = 37.21 m/s (= 83 mph!) free fall distance (from online calculator) = 129.83 m (= 426 ft, or about 35 stories!) Note the calculations above of just how fast Granny Smith was free falling, and just how far the high-diving board was off the ground. Those numbers in themselves are astounding. Would Granny Smith really be unharmed after being suddenly stopped from that speed? Why would the ponies build a high-diving platform that tall (and not even have it facing over the pool)? So, with the above numbers, the impulse, or change in momentum, of Granny Smith from her free fall velocity to zero is: J = mvi - mvf = (45.36 kg)(37.21 m/s) - 0 = 1687.85 N·s Now we need to know the time period over which Granny Smith experienced this change in momentum. To get this, I counted the frames between the frame when the rope around Granny Smith's legs first becomes taut and the frame when Granny Smith first "springs back" from the bottom of her fall, which I counted as 10 frames. Since the video is 24 frames/second, this means that Granny Smith was stopped in a time period of 5/12 of a second: t = (10 frames)/(24 frames/second) = 5/12 s Thus, the average force needed to stop Granny Smith's free fall is the impulse divided by the time period over which the impulse takes place: F = J/t = (1687.85 N·s)/(5/12 s) = 4050.84 N To get a sense of how big this force is, let's re-arrange F = ma and, again using Earth's gravitational acceleration, find the equivalent mass for this force: m = F/a = (4050.84 N)/(9.81 m/s2) = 412.93 kg = 910.35 lb FINAL RESULT AND IMPLICATIONS: The average force needed for Applejack to stop Granny Smith's free fall is roughly equivalent to the force needed for Applejack to suspend a 900 lb weight off the ground, and by holding a rope tied to the weight in between her teeth, no less! For comparison, even the largest Atlas stones used in the World's Strongest Man competition are about 350 lbs. The necessary force is probably even greater than I calculated once other factors are taken into account, such as the angle at which Applejack is pulling the rope and the coefficient of static friction between the rope and her teeth, which could be substantially reduced by, for example, saliva in her mouth. Thus, it seems a little unlikely that Applejack's jaw muscles are powerful enough to exert the necessary force to stop Granny Smith. In fact, I can think of several failure points in this whole scenario of Applejack trying to stop Granny Smith, even assuming that she successfully lassos Granny Smith's hind legs: 1. The rope, once pulled taut, simply slips out from between Applejack's teeth; 2. Applejack dislocates her jaw trying to hold on to the rope; 3. Applejack holds on to the rope, but is pulled right off the diving board; 4. The lasso around Granny Smith's legs slips off under the sudden force on it. In short, after analysis, the scenario in "Leap of Faith" where Applejack lassos Granny Smith from atop the high-diving platform and stops her by pulling the rope held between her teeth seems extremely unlikely to be able to happen as depicted. What do you think? Do you agree with this analysis? Thanks for reading!