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So I was watching some videos about accents, and I thought it would be cool to have a discussion about accents from our regions. So, lets talk about how silly we talk, or the people around us at least.

 

I'm from Massachusetts, I really don't have much of an accent nor do most people I know, but I do notice I do sometimes say words a certain way sometimes although I think its subtle when it does comes out, but then again I might sound super off to somebody out of my region and I just don't notice. :P

 

So here is a video of a lady speaking with the Boston accent, and she is so right about people faking the accent and calling it BAHHHSTON.

 

Edited by Zoraxe
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I don't agree with all the people saying they have "no accent".   First of all, you probably just don't notice it because everyone around you talks that way.   Second, there is no "normal american

So I was watching some videos about accents, and I thought it would be cool to have a discussion about accents from our regions. So, lets talk about how silly we talk, or the people around us at least

I have a notable southern drawl, but in Texas our drawl is kind of different compared to many other southern states It's ironic, because I aspire to be an English teacher one day but in casual conve

I live in Australia, and from my area I've met plenty of people with rather thick Australian accents, especially my father. Funny little story; I was going to be named Paris, but my parents went for another name since apparently Paris sounds jarring on my father's accent. xP

 

Personally, my accent is less of my native country and is more of an autism accent that sounds very androgynous.

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I'm from Iowa. We have no accent. You want to know what Iowans sound like, just watch the news and how the broadcasters speak, that's pretty much it. Course we do have a few words we use that differ from other states, but they aren't terribly noticeable. If you get along the northern or southern border of the state, that's when you'll maybe start to find hints of a Minnesota or Missouri accent. 

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I live in Western Sydney, Australia. As far as I know, Australian accents don't vary by region, they vary by heritage background.

 

I have a standard Aussie accent. I pronounce "er" as "ah."

So I pronounce "baker" as "bakah."

 

And I use the general Aussie 'i.'

Instead of saying "Like" I say "Loike." (The 'o' isn't emphasized, it's slightly silent.)

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I live in NorCal and at college, many ponies around me say the words "hella" and "hecka". As for accents, I don't think there's one that all of us ponies from NorCal have in common. It varies depending on the pony and the influence he/she's received (cultural background, social groups, etc.). For example, some Mexican-Americans here have a Mexican flavor to their accent due to being a natural Mexican-Spanish speaker or at least one of their parents having that accent. I even see some Asian-Americans sounding slightly Asian. I admit there are some words I pronounce differently than others around me do since none of my parents are American (with one of them still having an accent). Hell, I rarely say "hella" or "hecka". But overall, I talk like a pony from NorCal with some differences.

Edited by CC_Maud_Pie
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I'm from quebec, so I speak french but differently

here's an example of typical french canadian accent with swearing (WARNING, YOU MAY NOT EVEN UNDERSTAND A WORD IN THIS VIDEO)

 

 

 

think Big sti!

 

 

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I live in the Western Lower Peninsula of Michigan, soooo:

 

- We talk very fast

- We slur all our words together

- We say hard consonants by stopping breath with our lungs

 

So as that last one says, we don't actually say things like 't' in words.  Apartment would be "aparh' meh'".

 

OR, especially with t's, we will just change them to d's to save energy, like 'little' becomes "liddle".  And if they are after an 'n', we just omit them altogether, like in consonant, it's just "consonan'".

 

I looked all this up by the way, since of course my accent sounds perfectly normal to me.  But something new I learned when I was researching it:  apparently you guys in the rest of the US say things like "quarter of three" when referring to time.  Well in Michigan, we just say "quarter to three", and since we smash all our words together really fast, it's more like "quartertathree".

 

I will be honest though, I've never ever heard someone say "quarter of three" or say the time that way before.  xD

Edited by legionbrony
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I'm from Iowa. We have no accent. You want to know what Iowans sound like, just watch the news and how the broadcasters speak, that's pretty much it. Course we do have a few words we use that differ from other states, but they aren't terribly noticeable. If you get along the northern or southern border of the state, that's when you'll maybe start to find hints of a Minnesota or Missouri accent. 

 

http://www.kcci.com/news/central-iowa/this-is-iowa-do-we-have-an-accent/24530054

No accent? Hmm... interesting, so I looked this up, and it seems Iowans do have an accent, but its very mild. The video gives a few words as an example that Iowans do, like pronouncing 'cot' and 'caught' the same. But I guess except for those minor things, they overall have no accent, except saying 'Milk' like 'Melk'.

 

What do you think, is this video wrong or correct in your opinion?

 

I live in NorCal and at college, many ponies around me say the words "hella" and "hecka". As for accents, I don't think there's one that all of us ponies from NorCal have in common. It varies depending on the pony and the influence he/she's received (cultural background, social groups, etc.). For example, some Mexican-Americans here have a Mexican flavor to their accent due to being a natural Mexican-Spanish speaker or at least one of their parents having that accent. I even see some Asian-Americans sounding slightly Asian. I admit there are some words I pronounce differently than others around me do since none of my parents are American (with one of them still having an accent). Hell, I rarely say "hella" or "hecka". But overall, I talk like a pony from NorCal with some differences.

 

I also looked up Californians because they also supposedly have 'no accent', but as you said there are a lot of different people that have lived in Cali and has created a lot of differences in the way people talk in different areas in cali, but that something new is developing, its very subtle but it seems like they have a tendency to exaggerate vowels a bit according to this link.

http://audio.californiareport.org/archive/R201211231630/a

 

http://www.laweekly.com/news/the-californians-ridiculous-accents-on-snl-might-reflect-golden-state-reality-2391923

 

Having never been to Cali , I can't tell if that's accurate at all. Not the SNL skit, obviously, but the vowel thing.

Edited by Zoraxe
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I live in NorCal and at college, many ponies around me say the words "hella" and "hecka."

I hella do that. XD

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I lived in California all my life, NorCal to be exact. So as far as my English goes, its fairly clear. But growing up in a Filipino household, sometimes the broken English that is exchanged between my family and I, rubs off on me. For instance:

 

"Why are they doing that?"

 

I know this is the proper way to ask this question, but when I slip, I'll end up saying this:

 

"Why they're doing like that?"

 

It usually happens when I'm comfortable with who I'm talking to, or if I end up talking too fast. My words stumble.

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I grew up in a small town in western Pennsylvania just east of Ohio.  We have a Midwest accent, which is what you usually hear on TV.  Some differences

a small stream is a crick

barbed wire is bob wire

potato & tomato are pronounced w a long aye sound not ah

I personally say eye there not e there.  According to the dictionary, either is correct (once won a small bet on it)

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http://www.kcci.com/news/central-iowa/this-is-iowa-do-we-have-an-accent/24530054

No accent? Hmm... interesting, so I looked this up, and it seems Iowans do have an accent, but its very mild. The video gives a few words as an example that Iowans do, like pronouncing 'cot' and 'caught' the same. But I guess except for those minor things, they overall have no accent, except saying 'Milk' like 'Melk'.

 

What do you think, is this video wrong or correct in your opinion?

 

 

 

I also looked up Californians because they also supposedly have 'no accent', but as you said there are a lot of different people that have lived in Cali and has created a lot of differences in the way people talk in different areas in cali, but that something new is developing, its very subtle but it seems like they have a tendency to exaggerate vowels a bit according to this link.

http://audio.californiareport.org/archive/R201211231630/a

 

http://www.laweekly.com/news/the-californians-ridiculous-accents-on-snl-might-reflect-golden-state-reality-2391923

 

Having never been to Cali , I can't tell if that's accurate at all. Not the SNL skit, obviously, but the vowel thing.

Like I said, it depends on the pony. I don't think there's one accent everypony in California has in common. I've read that article before but while some of it maybe true, it varies by pony. Some may sound like a normal American, some might have Valley Girl elements, some might have some surfer terms in their vocabulary, some may sound completely newscaster depending on how much they train, and some are influenced by their heritage or even what they've been watching. But most importantly, not everypony in California sounds the same nor pronounces every word the same.

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The last 3 generations of my family have all had really plain, vaguely posh-sounding British accents. I don't know why, considering my grandparents on my father's side live in Yorkshire and those on my mother's side live in Devon.

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I'm from Somerset, in the South West of England. Even though I never picked it up myself, a fair few people down here speak kind of like pirates I guess, but more slurred and even less charming.

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