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kanwe yest

Music What do YOU consider a DJ? + Difference between DJ'ing and Producing

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(edited)

BEFORE I START: i would just like to say, this is mostly(not strictly) meant for music producers. If you're not a music producer/creator, you can obviously still read through this, but some users may not understand everything I'm saying. but still, feel free to read if you'd like.

 

I AM IN NO WAY INTENDING TO OFFEND OR TAKE SHOTS AT ANY MUSIC PRODUCERS/DJ'S HERE

 

I'd like if it everyone(or most people) read this first post before replying. And remember, please don't get offended because this is NOT a stab at anyone here who makes music, because if it was a stab at you, we would have to remember you're not the only people making music on computers.

 

So here we go.

 

Most people know what DJ'ing is. But do all of us really know what it stands for? DJ stands for disc jockey. And that is what hip-hop producers from the 90's and 80's, possibly 70's used. They used the vinyl discs to sample jazz music or whatever, chop it, and speed/slow it to their liking, then add a drum beat and a bassline, and claim it as their own beat. Which is called sampling.

 

As the years went by, the meaning of the abbreviation DJ seems to have been forgotten, and just looked at "DJ" as it's own word. And now we have computers, with music producing software where you don't need any instruments, some don't even require money. I think that is amazing, and great that people can make their own music at home now. But should they really be calling themselves DJ's? I feel like this post MAY cause an argument or debate but please remember i'm not trying to insult anyone who makes music and calls themself a DJ. I personally think you should label yourself with whatever title you want.

 

so a Music Producer is obviously someone who makes the beats, and controls how the song sounds and everything. But not all producers are DJ's, because they aren't using DISCS. And again, that's what DJ means, DISC JOCKEY, someone who makes music sampling from those vinyl physical discs.

 

Even if you are using a real physical MPC, that's still not DJ'ing, but just producing. I myself used to use vinyl records to actually make music a while back, but never called myself a DJ. And as of right now, i'd DEFINITELY not call myself a DJ because I've been just using Reason 8, Maschine, and FL to make music. So i'd just call  myself a producer.

 

so what I mean is I don't really consider computer users who create music, as DJ's. but just producers.

 

just my 2 cents.

 


 

and here are the differences:

 

DJ(Disc-Jockey) is someone who samples music from vinyl records. or scratches them. A DJ is considered a producer because they are making music at the same time as DJ'ing.

 

PRODUCER is someone who makes the music, not specifically using vinyl records, but with use of just an MPC, or computer software.

 

now if anyone wants to add onto that, or tell me what they think PLEASE DO SO. In all honesty, it's confusion that caused this post. I honestly do not understand what people mean by calling themselves DJ's while making music strictly on a computer.

 

but please remember what I said i am in no way denying anyone's talent, or TELLING anyone what to do. i'm just saying what I think, and expecting someone to hopefully correct me or at least tell me what they think.

 

(oh god i HATE my anxiety so mUCH! everytime i make a really long message like this to anyone, my fingers and toes get cold, and i start sweating, feeling hot and cold at the same time!)

Edited by jeru the damaja

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I've always thought of a DJ as someone who DJ's at events and may or may not compose music as well. Whereas a producer doesn't DJ, they only create music.

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(edited)

DJs are just people who play music live to entertain a huge crowd of people, particularly in clubs and parties, and I think that is great! I even want to become one myself, so I'm studying on how to DJ myself. It's actually harder than most people think. You have to learn how to fade in and fade out the tracks, know what atmosphere you want to give the crowd, also learn how to control the sound and volume etc.

 

There are also people who are simply just producers. Some just prefer to make the music, rather than DJ it live, like those young producers who advertise their masterpieces in YouTube comment sections. I'll also be getting FL Studio later on this year, so i'll also be working on the music production. The music production is also harder than everyone thinks. Some of the EDM songs might sound simple, but they would have taken days to complete.



Also, it's not always on a turntable. Some people like Madeon use a launchpad, which requires a lot of practice, since you need timing and good memory on which buttons to press.


There are DJs, who just prefer to mix other artist's songs during parties or clubs, music producers, who just create the music and nothing more, or people like me, who would want to do both. Edited by DJ Gumball

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(edited)

@ is right. In the true sense, a DJ is someone who plays music for an audience, be it radio or event, whether they use discs or digital medium. The name stuck. They're still the music jockey. They may sample and put their own spin on it (and literally a spin on it, if they're using vinyl discs), but the term DJ for home mixing/recording and any and all producing is a misnomer.

Edited by PiratePony

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(edited)

You don't necessarily have to have literal viny discs to be a dj anymore. So long as you're mixing music live on whatever you prefer, you're a dj.

 

If you don't do live mixes and only make music with software, then you're a producer. A producer can also be a dj and vice versa so long as both requirements are filled.

 

Playing your songs at a venue just one after another shouldn't classify you directly as a dj either, imo. If you actually edit the songs, do things to them that aren't in the originals and whatnot, then I'd gladly call you both, but for the most part, nah. Why people like to add on "DJ" to a name when they don't do it is beyond me and actually a bit annoying.

Edited by Gieeieiaa Tniaiea

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I've always thought of a DJ as someone who DJ's at events and may or may not compose music as well. Whereas a producer doesn't DJ, they only create music.

They do. But 90's groups like Gang Starr, DJ Premier was the producer, and he made music with both MPC(for drums and such), sampling keyboard, and vinyl discs. That's why a lot of their songs you can hear scratching, and to even get the samples on a sample keyboard you'd need to record sounds from the vinyls.

 

@, I know but I see it as just doing exactly that. Preforming at live shows and such. I don't consider it DJ'ing because DJ is an abbreviation.

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My definitions for DJ and Producer are as follows:

 

As long as one is making music, whether it is samples or all original, and he or she is using the tools of a DJ (turntable, synthesizer, computer, vinyls, etc.), then the individual in question is a DJ.

 

When the DJ begins the process of mastering his or her music (and all the other jazz in audio engineering), then the DJ becomes a producer as well.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

a shift from analog to digital shouldn't dictate whether one is a DJ or not. What if I made a beat sampling a vinyl of Deep Purple's Burn? Now what if I used an MP3 version of the same album? Am I any less of a DJ, and is my music any less for it? If the technological medium dictated whether or not one is a DJ, then one could argue that since another is using vinyl, that person is not a real DJ because they should be using etched bronze plates.

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@, I understand what you're all saying.  But I look at it as calling themselves something they're not. Launchpad is just producing then. And also entertaining is just... entertaining! And I know how to DJ, with actual discs, and it's not that easy neither. And I'm not putting down live production (modern) neither, but in disc DJ'ing, I remember the timing was important, your HANDS needed to be strong and fast, because as the sample was moving along, you had to remember, scratching is a LOT more than just moving the disc back and forth.

 

The middle slider(i'll call it that for those who don't know) can also be used to mute the sound, while the DJ's headphones can still hear it. and when you're SAMPLING, which I do a lot of live sampling on vinyls, as soon as your sample area finishes, you need to quickly pull the disc back without sliding your hand off accidentally, and replay your drum beat loop, which can get annoying at times.

 

and actual classic dj'ing can be hard as well because the drums aren't like today where you have pre-set tempos. you actually used MPC's like an actual drum set, but with your fingers. so YOU pressed which drum sounds you wanted, and recorded it, then looped it.

 

and im not saying modern dj's are talentless. It takes talent to do any form of dj'ing.

 

now the rest of this post is not aimed at gumball.

 

I guess the actual phrase "DJ'ing" could mean something else now, but now I kinda understand the difference. So from my understanding, as of like NOW in time, DJ'ing is LIVE production, while producing itself is just where you have a lot of time, and you're not doing it live, so you can make mistakes and re-do it. yes? no? correct me if i'm wrong.


My definitions for DJ and Producer are as follows:

 

As long as one is making music, whether it is samples or all original, and he or she is using the tools of a DJ (turntable, synthesizer, computer, vinyls, etc.), then the individual in question is a DJ.

 

When the DJ begins the process of mastering his or her music (and all the other jazz in audio engineering), then the DJ becomes a producer as well.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

a shift from analog to digital shouldn't dictate whether one is a DJ or not. What if I made a beat sampling a vinyl of Deep Purple's Burn? Now what if I used an MP3 version of the same album? Am I any less of a DJ, and is my music any less for it? If the technological medium dictated whether or not one is a DJ, then one could argue that since another is using vinyl, that person is not a real DJ because they should be using etched bronze plates.

I don't see that you're understanding exactly what I said.

 

I don't mean I don't like to call them DJ's. what I meant was that is almost a lie. If they aren't using discs, how does that make them a disc jockey?

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I don't mean I don't like to call them DJ's. what I meant was that is almost a lie. If they aren't using discs, how does that make them a disc jockey?

 

 

I guess the actual phrase "DJ'ing" could mean something else now, but now I kinda understand the difference. So from my understanding, as of like NOW in time, DJ'ing is LIVE production, while producing itself is just where you have a lot of time, and you're not doing it live, so you can make mistakes and re-do it. yes? no? correct me if i'm wrong.

 

So you are saying that the term DJ is a misnomer?

 

It seems you answered your own question in the second quote. The term DJ doesn't necessarily have the meaning it used to, much like how ATT used to mean American Telephone and Telegraph.

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(edited)

Yes I am saying it's a misnomer in a way.

 

And I didn't answer my question. Which was "how are they disc jockeys without using discs?"

 

That's like calling "Mr. UsesSteamAlot" by that name, but he doesn't even use steam.

 

Better yet: it's like calling yourself a brony when you aren't even a fan of the show, and have never watched a single episode.

Edited by jeru the damaja

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A DJ is someone who mixes music for certain events. They create playlists according to the event they're DJing at. 

 

A producer creates music of any kind. They can also be a musician too. I am a producer and DJ, and mostly DJ in my uncle's charter bus. 

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@,

 

 

 

I guess the actual phrase "DJ'ing" could mean something else now

 

That is exactly the answer: A DJ now is not what a DJ was.The method may be different, but the result is still the same.

 

An old-school disc jokey uses solely analog tech, and new-school disc jockeys use primarily digital tech, but both achieve the same end.

 

The only thing separating what you are calling a disc jockey and these modern misnomic disc jockeys is time.

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well... I think I kinda got it. I've been a little confused about that though so, sorry about the small argument. It might take me a bit to remember that DJ is used as like, it's own word as if it were like Deejay. Thanks.

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