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My Little Story: Airforce Basic Military Training.


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Experience is one thing you can't get for nothing. This statement holds true as the greatest teacher of all was right in front of me and others as well in Basic Military Training.

 

I have a short and simple story I want to share with you my little ponies. I don't have the intelligence to make it a long one, but if you want to hear more, PM me and I will gladly share it with you.

 

 

It all started with papers and tests. You go to a nearby recruiters office and ask them "Where can I sign up?". They will give you a prequalify sheet that you will need fill out and it consists of general personal information like "Full name, street address, phone number, ect." Once you have filled that out, they will probably ask you if you want to take a short practice test on the basic of the actual ASVAB test. You can always deny and say that you want to be scheduled to tackle on the real CAT- ASVAB test or test your basic knowledge on this practice test. Totally up to you. I took the practice test to make sure I know what is coming when I'm ready to tackle on the real one. I made a pretty high score on the practice ASVAB test (77), but when I went over MEPS and took the real test, it was alot harder! I didn't score very well (55), but it was qualifying and I was glad, but my job selection was very limited. I was booked as a Medical Distributer, and was set to leave on the 22nd of August.

 

It was 10:12 P.M., a time I last saw my family before I disappear for 8 and a half weeks. I got on the bus with my bags and was seated in the third seat from the front, left side. An awkward looking Indian man was seated next to me and I spoken to him, having predictions on what we are about to get ourselves into when we get there.

 

It's now 12:09 A.M. and we are finally here. We sat in our seat, anxiously waiting for something to happen. Not even 2 minutes pass, the door opened and a decent tall looking man got on the bus and faced directly towards us. His first words were, "You have 30 seconds to get your bags and stand on this concrete space, ready for more official instructions." and got off the bus. The first two seats were immediately abandoned by the first four men in front and I was following right behind them. Already, my arms and legs were shaking.

 

We all managed to step onto the concrete space in 30 seconds flat, according to the tall man with a singer hat on, but, "Wasn't good enough!", he acclaimed. He told us to get in 5 rows of 10 in less than 30 seconds, arms length away from each other and was gladly done in less than 30 seconds. He then pulled out a binder, filled with sheets and started calling out names, which we responded, "Here!" when our names were called. It went pretty well and smoothly.

 

After the row call, the tall man told us to follow the man in front of you, following him. We walked up a stairs that probably took us 3 minutes to walk up. We were led up to a row of lockers and were told stand in face front of one while standing next to the man you were following. I stood right in middle of the rows of lockers and was nervously looking side to side of me. The T.I. Sergeant then commanded us to face him and watch him as he demonstrated on how to properly open your locker, putting your belongings in, and locking it up. He specifically said, "If it is not properly locked, you will see your shit all over this very floor, so go ahead set your heads out of your asses. NOW!" When it was our turn, we repeated what we saw from the demonstration and already, people were messing up. All I heard was, "DAMNIT! WERE YOU TOO BLIND TO SEE WHAT I WAS SHOWING YOU ON HOW TO OPEN AND LOCK UP A DAMN LOCKER OR ARE JUST ONE STUPID BASTARD WHO CANT OPEN OR LOCK UP A LOCKER?", then loud banging on what it sounds like a metal bat hitting against a metal cage. I dared not to look. Luckily, I did everything properly and was ready for more official instructions.

 

Were led to what it seems like a cafeteria. We stood in a line, waiting to get in. One by one, we were led to different sides of the cafeteria, where we will be able to get our tray and be seated at a table. This time, there were about 7 other T.I. Sergeants, waiting for someone to mess up. I successfully made it through without getting yelled at, but by the time I got my tray and got to my table, I made a mistake. Apparently, you were not supposed to sit down and start eating until your table was full. I was shocked when I heard, "GET UP!" STAND UP AND PICK UP YOUR TRAY!". I did it without any hesitation, but I was still pressured with "HURRY UP!". I stood up and he stood there, staring at me silently and attempting to yell at me some more. I just kept a straight face and kept my eyes on one man who was staring directly at me, in front of me. Once our table was full and was ready to be seated, he told us to site down and keep your bag (bag of our training clothes) under our seat. I managed to do this correctly, but one other poor soul was not lucky. He told us to get up again and do it all over again, this correctly. It took us about 4 tries before being ready to eat. When I was done eating, I got up, looked to where the trash was and walked towards it. Again, another mistake. I was supposed to stand up and stay standing until a T.I. Sergeant allowed us to go. I was yelled at and told to go back and stay standing. I was commanded to go and throw away my trash, after going through what we call, "The Snake Pit". The Snake Pit is where a bunch of T.I. Sergeants are group together, waiting nearby the trash, waiting for someone to mess up. I had to through them and get to the trash and boy! Was it breath taking!

 

I do in fact have more, but I am running out of time and will share the rest of it when I get a chance.

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Experience is one thing you can't get for nothing. This statement holds true as the greatest teacher of all was right in front of me and others as well in Basic Military Training.

 

I have a short and simple story I want to share with you my little ponies. I don't have the intelligence to make it a long one, but if you want to hear more, PM me and I will gladly share it with you.

 

 

It all started with papers and tests. You go to a nearby recruiters office and ask them "Where can I sign up?". They will give you a prequalify sheet that you will need fill out and it consists of general personal information like "Full name, street address, phone number, ect." Once you have filled that out, they will probably ask you if you want to take a short practice test on the basic of the actual ASVAB test. You can always deny and say that you want to be scheduled to tackle on the real CAT- ASVAB test or test your basic knowledge on this practice test. Totally up to you. I took the practice test to make sure I know what is coming when I'm ready to tackle on the real one. I made a pretty high score on the practice ASVAB test (77), but when I went over MEPS and took the real test, it was alot harder! I didn't score very well (55), but it was qualifying and I was glad, but my job selection was very limited. I was booked as a Medical Distributer, and was set to leave on the 22nd of August.

 

It was 10:12 P.M., a time I last saw my family before I disappear for 8 and a half weeks. I got on the bus with my bags and was seated in the third seat from the front, left side. An awkward looking Indian man was seated next to me and I spoken to him, having predictions on what we are about to get ourselves into when we get there.

 

It's now 12:09 A.M. and we are finally here. We sat in our seat, anxiously waiting for something to happen. Not even 2 minutes pass, the door opened and a decent tall looking man got on the bus and faced directly towards us. His first words were, "You have 30 seconds to get your bags and stand on this concrete space, ready for more official instructions." and got off the bus. The first two seats were immediately abandoned by the first four men in front and I was following right behind them. Already, my arms and legs were shaking.

 

We all managed to step onto the concrete space in 30 seconds flat, according to the tall man with a singer hat on, but, "Wasn't good enough!", he acclaimed. He told us to get in 5 rows of 10 in less than 30 seconds, arms length away from each other and was gladly done in less than 30 seconds. He then pulled out a binder, filled with sheets and started calling out names, which we responded, "Here!" when our names were called. It went pretty well and smoothly.

 

After the row call, the tall man told us to follow the man in front of you, following him. We walked up a stairs that probably took us 3 minutes to walk up. We were led up to a row of lockers and were told stand in face front of one while standing next to the man you were following. I stood right in middle of the rows of lockers and was nervously looking side to side of me. The T.I. Sergeant then commanded us to face him and watch him as he demonstrated on how to properly open your locker, putting your belongings in, and locking it up. He specifically said, "If it is not properly locked, you will see your shit all over this very floor, so go ahead set your heads out of your asses. NOW!" When it was our turn, we repeated what we saw from the demonstration and already, people were messing up. All I heard was, "DAMNIT! WERE YOU TOO BLIND TO SEE WHAT I WAS SHOWING YOU ON HOW TO OPEN AND LOCK UP A DAMN LOCKER OR ARE JUST ONE STUPID BASTARD WHO CANT OPEN OR LOCK UP A LOCKER?", then loud banging on what it sounds like a metal bat hitting against a metal cage. I dared not to look. Luckily, I did everything properly and was ready for more official instructions.

 

Were led to what it seems like a cafeteria. We stood in a line, waiting to get in. One by one, we were led to different sides of the cafeteria, where we will be able to get our tray and be seated at a table. This time, there were about 7 other T.I. Sergeants, waiting for someone to mess up. I successfully made it through without getting yelled at, but by the time I got my tray and got to my table, I made a mistake. Apparently, you were not supposed to sit down and start eating until your table was full. I was shocked when I heard, "GET UP!" STAND UP AND PICK UP YOUR TRAY!". I did it without any hesitation, but I was still pressured with "HURRY UP!". I stood up and he stood there, staring at me silently and attempting to yell at me some more. I just kept a straight face and kept my eyes on one man who was staring directly at me, in front of me. Once our table was full and was ready to be seated, he told us to site down and keep your bag (bag of our training clothes) under our seat. I managed to do this correctly, but one other poor soul was not lucky. He told us to get up again and do it all over again, this correctly. It took us about 4 tries before being ready to eat. When I was done eating, I got up, looked to where the trash was and walked towards it. Again, another mistake. I was supposed to stand up and stay standing until a T.I. Sergeant allowed us to go. I was yelled at and told to go back and stay standing. I was commanded to go and throw away my trash, after going through what we call, "The Snake Pit". The Snake Pit is where a bunch of T.I. Sergeants are group together, waiting nearby the trash, waiting for someone to mess up. I had to through them and get to the trash and boy! Was it breath taking!

 

I do in fact have more, but I am running out of time and will share the rest of it when I get a chance.

 

Deep and in-depth. Thank you for sharing your experiences so openly like that. I'm going into the Marine Corps in another 1.5 years (after high school) and it's nice hearing different boot camp experiences in the military. I wish you luck in your training. Stay strong, and thank you for choosing to serve our country.

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Deep and in-depth. Thank you for sharing your experiences so openly like that. I'm going into the Marine Corps in another 1.5 years (after high school) and it's nice hearing different boot camp experiences in the military. I wish you luck in your training. Stay strong, and thank you for choosing to serve our country.

 

Me too!!! see you there!
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