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Is trying to push a Giant Strawberry @-@


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Well, using some math skills(ish), I've calculated the density of a strawberry, the mass of a 2-meter tall strawberry, and come to a conclusion that that particular strawberry weighs about 13 pounds (5.9 kg). She shouldn't be struggling like that, it should be about as easy as pushing a large marshmallow.

 

...Which is totally the appropriate reaction to viewing this drawing. Yeeeyy~

 

I'm very tired.

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Not sure if teeny pony, or GIGANT0R strawberry.

 

Both are good. :D


Well, using some math skills(ish), I've calculated the density of a strawberry, the mass of a 2-meter tall strawberry, and come to a conclusion that that particular strawberry weighs about 13 pounds (5.9 kg). She shouldn't be struggling like that, it should be about as easy as pushing a large marshmallow.

 

...Which is totally the appropriate reaction to viewing this drawing. Yeeeyy~

 

I'm very tired.

 

Sorry, your math is off. Square-Cube law (or allometric scaling, to be specific). For example- let's say we have a cube where each side is 1 inch, and it has a volume of 1 cubic inch and weighs 1 lb. So it's density is 1lb/cubic inch. Now, let's scale it up to each side being 2 inches.

 

It's not just twice as big. It's volume is now 8 cubic inches, and to keep the same density it's mass MUST be 8 lbs (m/v=d).

 

Okay, let's go a little further. Each side is, say, 12 inches.

 

Volume is now 1728 cubic inches, and that means it's mass is 1728 lbs. So it's not 12 times bigger, even though each side is.

 

Now for our hypothetical 2 meter tall strawberry...

 

This neat website ( http://www.aqua-calc.com/calculate/food-volume-to-weight) lets you search food items and pulls up their volume, density, and mass. That's helpful for number crunching. :-D

 

So let's use nice, easy set of numbers. A good strawberry would be between 1-2 inches long or so, or 16-32 cm. Let's just say, 25cm. That's about right. So a strawberry 2m tall, would be 80 times taller than our original. So it's volume would be about 512,000cm3 (or 803)- which, being almost all water, would give it a density roughly the same as water (1g/cm3), so 512,000 grams. Which is the same as 512kg, or just over 1,128lbs. That's the actual mass of our 2m strawberry.

 

What about our 13lb strawberry, you ask? LEt's find out! :-D

 

For something 2m (6.5ft) tall to have a mass of 13lbs (or about 6kg), we'd need to know it's volume or it's density to finish number crunching.  This handy site ( http://www.calculatorsoup.com/calculators/physics/density.php) lets you plug in any two values (mass, volume, density) to calculate the third- to make things easier, we'll just pretend our 2m strawberry is a 2m cube of berry goodness (so total volume is 8m 3). Plugging in the values, we get-

 

0.75kg/m3 which in g/cm3 converts to 0.00075g/cm3.

 

Water is 1g/cm3. Room temperature air at sea level is 0.001225 g/cm3.

 

Which means, the 2m tall strawberry weighing 13lbs is about 1.63 times LESS DENSE than air.

 

Now, a strawberry isn't a perfect cube of course. It's more like a pyramid kind of thing. Using "perfect geometric shapes" numbers, a pyramid with a square base has the same volume as 1/3 of a cube where each side is the same as the pyramid base. That would put our "hypothetical strawberry" at a density of 0.00225g/cm3. Which, while denser than air, is still 444ish times less dense than water (which is about what a strawberry's density is).

 

So, whatever that 2m tall, 13lb object is- it's not a strawberry. It could possibly be a strawberry balloon that is too dense to float, maybe. :-P

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Well, using some math skills(ish), I've calculated the density of a strawberry, the mass of a 2-meter tall strawberry, and come to a conclusion that that particular strawberry weighs about 13 pounds (5.9 kg). She shouldn't be struggling like that, it should be about as easy as pushing a large marshmallow.

 

...Which is totally the appropriate reaction to viewing this drawing. Yeeeyy~

 

I'm very tired.

 

wow I thought it would be heavier. Well maybe its a different type of strawberry :)

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[long post]

 

Yeah, ah... you're assuming the size of a strawberry, the density, and of course "mass in kg" doesn't equate to "weight in kg".

 

Strawberries have a lighter density than water. You can tell because strawberries float in water, as opposed to grapes, which just sink.

 

But I digress. I really don't care if my math was that much off, I was sleepdrunk and braindead at the time... so...

 

Try using the formula for volume of a sphere, that'll help. :3

Edited by Meson Bolt
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Yeah, ah... you're assuming the size of a strawberry, the density, and of course "mass in kg" doesn't equate to "weight in kg".

 

Strawberries have a lighter density than water. You can tell because strawberries float in water, as opposed to grapes, which just sink.

 

But I digress. I really don't care if my math was that much off, I was sleepdrunk and braindead at the time... so...

 

Try using the formula for volume of a sphere, that'll help. :3

 

 

So your main criticism here is that I didn't factor in ANOTHER constant that would have made the figure you provided even MORE flagrantly incorrect? Really? And you harp at me for assuming unit values when YOU YOURSELF set 2m as a value AND 13lbs of weight as a value?

 

Using the formula for a sphere changes very little, for one (since strawberries aren't spherical and I was nice enough to explain the pyramid to cube ratio, and even gave the figure for it using the arbitrary values YOU GAVE). But you know what? I'm such a goddamn sport, I'm going to do it ANYWAY. Volume of a sphere is V = (4/3)πr3. So, if 2m is the diameter (or 2r, putting r=1), we get: volume=4.19m3. Water has a density of 1000kg/m3, so we plug that in, and: a sphere with a radius of 1m would have a mass of: 4,190kg. Or, 9,237 lbs. Now, for YOUR math to be correct, that 13lb (or 6kg) strawberry, with a volume of 4.19m3, would have a density of: 1.4319809069212 kg/m3. Which is about a THOUSAND TIMES less dense than water (1000kg/m3), and only slightly more dense than air (about 1.225 kg/m3, depending on elevation and temperature), which means YOUR strawberry would be an actual balloon, but wouldn't float in air.

 

 

 

 

YOU YOURSELF said it "weighed" 13lbs, so harping at me about mass vs weight is ridiculous, for two. And you mixed up units in imperial and metric and length and volume and mass and weight, for three. Not to mention, your claim includes ZERO formulas or sources. I provided formulas, links to verify said formulas, and the stated values in question. Now, I did use simplified ranges, since the difference between water's density (which, being the base measurement for ALL SORTS of metric unit standards) and the posted density of a strawberry (hey, look, a source I PROVIDED) is negligible. And crunching 25cm is much, MUCH easier than trying to find an average value for a strawberry length (since YOU, YOURSELF, IN YOUR POST used length, not volume). I didn't feel like rushing to the store and buying a pack of strawberries so I could measure them, then trying to determine if I should use mean, median, or mode average figures, THEN measuring mass and volume with a kitchen scale and a measuring cup. Math is easier.

 

Want me to walk you through the calculations again? Want me to explain the square cube rule again? Because regardless of what "perfect shape" you use, there's NO FREAKING WAY 2m in any direction of mostly liquid water in any shape of container weighs (oh wait, has a MASS OF) 13lbs.

 

Shall we really go into the difference between mass and weight, even though on Earth's surface under standard gravity the difference is basically semantics? I'll do it. I will pump so many goddamn numbers into this thread about a tiny horsie pushing a strawberry it'll look like a fucking Physics proof.

 

For the record- it's OK to say "I was wrong" and leave it at that. It's a life skill. Getting snarky is only gonna bring more snark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh, and OP? Love it. ^_^

 

I can't decide if it's cuter as a tiny horsie pushing a regular strawberry, or a regular horsie pushing a GINORMOUS strawberry. :P Which did you have in mind?

Edited by captainborgue
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