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Which instrument to play?

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I would like to learn to play an instrument, but I don't know which one would be the best decision. I mean, there are times when I am sad, thoughtful and I wish I could play the piano, and there are occasions when I am cheerful and would like to play the accordion. So, my question is: which instrument fits every music, what do you recommend? Thanks for your answers!

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piano. it can replicate the sound effects of most instruments and i believe it has the widest range of notes of all instruments.

they say if you learn the piano all other instruments become easier to learn. and its the easiest instrument to learn to write music with

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i play drums and i love it! i can play simple symphony music on my snare drum or play along to a song in the mood im feeling but the best way to learn is to try one and see if you like it but if you dont  like it then keep at it because some times music is frustrating

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I'd say piano. A piano can play so many different notes and chords and things that can be whatever you want it to be. On most instruments, you are restricted to either the treble or bass cleft, but the piano can do both. You can do almost anything musically possible on a piano. Plus, the piano is a great way to learn how to read and play music which makes all other instruments alot easier to pick up.

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Thanks for the answers, If piano is really the easiest to learn, then i'll take it as I don't even know a thing about music. I've met some CDEFGAH stuff, but nothing more...there is an awful lot to learn, I suppose...Pals, according to your personal experiences, how long will it take to learn to play the piano?

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Why not guitar? If you've got that tiny bit of musical talent you should be able to play simple songs in matter of days. (if your fingers survive... img-387689-1-5e7kmu.png) It's easy to start even if you don't know how to read music (but I think that you should learn it eventually... helps a lot in some situations) Aaaand yeah, I suppose that guitar fits most musical styles.

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I say guitar, too. I'm currently self-teaching to use the acoustic guitar, and it's not an easy task by any means, but it's doable. Plus if you're a fan of that soulful sound that America and the Eagles made, it's the instrument to learn. Not to mention it's portable, so if you've ever got some free time you can just pull it out and strum a few strings.

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Thanks for the answers, If piano is really the easiest to learn, then i'll take it as I don't even know a thing about music. I've met some CDEFGAH stuff, but nothing more...there is an awful lot to learn, I suppose...Pals, according to your personal experiences, how long will it take to learn to play the piano?

Huh? H isn't even a note. Anyway, you can learn basic music theory with any instrument. You can even learn it without a musical instrument. It's no big deal.

 

Anyway, piano's typically have a large range of notes. Somehow, people are believing that a large range makes it the best. That's totally not the case. If it were, you might as well bash any singer without an insane >3 octave modal vocal range. You might not want to pick an instrument based on "mood" as you mentioned in the OP, as instruments can do many moods. Timbre of a sound doesn't dictate mood, progression does.

 

Rather, I would suggest, what music would you want to perform? What instruments are typically used in what you'd be comfortable with, is basically what I meant by that. Do you want to be able to do vocals while playing as well?

 

As for the duration of learning, you can never really tell. People learn at vastly different paces, especially depending on your approach and goals. That shouldn't be of a concern. What really matters is that you enjoy playing it.

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Play whatever suits you, if I were to say, I would tell you to pick anything from the string family. (Best family)

Depends if you are doing this for a reason, or for self enjoyment? If you have one in mind, just go for it, and once you learn an instrument, there is nothing wrong with learning more.

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Huh? H isn't even a note. Anyway, you can learn basic music theory with any instrument. You can even learn it without a musical instrument. It's no big deal.

 

Anyway, piano's typically have a large range of notes. Somehow, people are believing that a large range makes it the best. That's totally not the case. If it were, you might as well bash any singer without an insane >3 octave modal vocal range. You might not want to pick an instrument based on "mood" as you mentioned in the OP, as instruments can do many moods. Timbre of a sound doesn't dictate mood, progression does.

 

Rather, I would suggest, what music would you want to perform? What instruments are typically used in what you'd be comfortable with, is basically what I meant by that. Do you want to be able to do vocals while playing as well?

 

As for the duration of learning, you can never really tell. People learn at vastly different paces, especially depending on your approach and goals. That shouldn't be of a concern. What really matters is that you enjoy playing it.

Well, mostly jazz and classical, so, wind instruments and piano, but I think that blowing an instrument can be really exhausting. 

 

 

Why not guitar? If you've got that tiny bit of musical talent you should be able to play simple songs in matter of days. (if your fingers survive... img-1331800-1-img-387689-1-5e7kmu.png) It's easy to start even if you don't know how to read music (but I think that you should learn it eventually... helps a lot in some situations) Aaaand yeah, I suppose that guitar fits most musical styles.

 

 

I say guitar, too. I'm currently self-teaching to use the acoustic guitar, and it's not an easy task by any means, but it's doable. Plus if you're a fan of that soulful sound that America and the Eagles made, it's the instrument to learn. Not to mention it's portable, so if you've ever got some free time you can just pull it out and strum a few strings.

Guitars may be the appropriate instrument for those who like rock and stuff, but as you could have read, it is not my style. Maybe, one day...

 

 

Play whatever suits you, if I were to say, I would tell you to pick anything from the string family. (Best family)

Depends if you are doing this for a reason, or for self enjoyment? If you have one in mind, just go for it, and once you learn an instrument, there is nothing wrong with learning more.

I do it for my own amusement, and I think that Twiliscael has the point, an electronic piano can imitate many instruments, it is said that it's easy to learn, therefore this is my actual decision, but I know much less than you regarding this topic, if you have a better advice, I'll take it.

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Well because i can't be a creative and can't play instruments like you lucky ones can, i don't play any... Its all because i can't and when i try i fail every time.

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I know how to play the piano and the accordion...but I would recommend the Piano first...and then if you love playing music, you could get yourself an accordion and start playing that.

I am not as experienced in the accordion as I am in the piano...and I am also not that fantastic at the piano...I also don't take lessons, I play by ear so...eeyup.

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(edited)

BEST THREAD EVER. Anyways; I play several instruments. My best is my violin. I also play guitar and a little keyboard. I have the knowledge of playing Viola and Cello and Ukulele; I just don't don't own any. I'm hoping to expand over to bass guitar soon. Go learn all of them! lol just kidding; but violins are really fun.

Edited by Spiders Phobic

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I'd say learn the violin. Just like the piano it can be played for a sad, somber type melody for when you're just a bit down, or you can play upbeat, peppy type songs for when you feel like messin' around :)

 

I myself played a bunch instruments back in school (ie - clarinet, bass clarinet, alto sax, tuba, keyboard, tried learning flute *didnt happen :|*, trumpet) and soon I'm hoping to by a drum set. It may take some time, but everyone finds the instrument that they love to play.

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(edited)

The clarinet is fairly easy to learn once you figure out how to make your first sound. The finger locations are all very intuitive (well... until you get to the really high register tongue.png). I still play it off and on, but I haven't really been as dedicated to it as I was back in the high school band. I think I might go play it now, actually...

 

I got discouraged from the piano when I was younger because I was forced to play it, playing the clarinet was my own choice. If you have the chance to learn the piano, I'd give it a shot.

Edited by Celtore

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Well, mostly jazz and classical, so, wind instruments and piano, but I think that blowing an instrument can be really exhausting.   

 

 Trust me, "blowing an instrument" is not exhausting. You're basically just breathing into it so unless you are doing marching band you don't have to get worried about tiring yourself out. 

 

I honestly find the piano to be one of the more difficult instruments if only because it requires you to read two different staffs and cleffs at the same time. Of course, I started out playing the saxophone (which looks way more complicated than it actually is) so that may explain why I see it this way.

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1) Find a teacher you like, and get along with. It's important that you feel comfortable and happy playing.

 

2) Play everything you can get your hands on. Don't limit yourself.

 

3) Force yourself to stick to it. There have been plenty of times when I wanted to quit. I'm really really really glad I didn't. It's OK to drop it for a while and pick it up later, but try to get into a habit playing.

 

4) It gets better. Moving up to the next level is difficult, but it's worth it.

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In days gone bye, you were started on the recorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recorder_(instrument)) to learn the basic concepts of music mainly because they are dead cheap and if you decided against continuing you hadn't really put much investment into it.

 

In my experience keyboard is the best next step. Modern electronic keyboards are extremely flexible allowing you reproduce a lot of stuff, and for some reason pianists seem to have an easier time moving to other instruments when they are in the mood.

 

If you're wishing to continue I recommend guitar for the next step. The problem with guitar is that past the basics, there is so many different ways to play it that it can get confusing. Especially as guitars themselves are usually specialized for the playing style. Classical, Spanish, flatpick; 12-string, 8-string, 6-string, so on and so forth.

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I agree with what Righteous said. Don't stop after playing for a week or so.

 

You may not have the initial talent as some people do, but it may just be potential, and can take some time to be fully uncovered. You'll just be playing one day, and something'll hit you. 

 

I've been trying to sing for years now, and I can say, that I have gotten better from when I first started *though I am probably the most self-critical person you can meet* and there have been times when I've been singing a song and I've had a "eureka" moment, that something became clear to me.

 

Everything takes time, even if you don't think you're good, you can BECOME good.

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I have to say I have always admire the versatility and potential the Piano has over almost all other instruments, the bad thing about is that you kind of need a truck to share your music or feel limited of what you can do using the keyboards.

 

For me i always found DA Bass as the most fun and enjoyable experience, yes no pony notice you are there and most of the time you dont bring the hype but being a bass player is like being  a support character you know all this is for you and even when you dont get much of the spotlight it feels great to carry the band on your rhythm.

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I play the bass clarinet (and can play others in the clarinet family) and can say that the blowing part is no more exhausting than the physical activity of playing piano/violin/etc.  Sure, if you're playing non-stop for 2 1/2 hours, you're definitely going to notice, but the same would go for just about anything.

 

A note concerning pianos: Eb.  Now terrible music pun aside, piano can be easy to learn, but very difficult to master.  I, for one, (for the few times that I've played piano) have a difficult time when I need to separate the actions of the left and right hand (for example, if it's required that I play faster notes in the left hand then the right).  Of course, the same can be said of all instruments, though it's a little more difficult to realize for pianos since you're literally just pushing down a bunch of keys.

 

If you're looking for instrument versatility, I would actually recommend getting into percussion.  While there is a lot to learn about being a percussionist, once you learn it, it is very easily transferrable between different percussion instruments (even the keyboard-type ones, like the marimba or xylophone).  Again, the same could be said for many different instruments, but I feel like it is most noticeable in the percussion section.

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(edited)

Pianos are so mainstream, why not harpsichord? It's like the piano's crazy grandfather. The kind of grandfather that has a wonky hip and tells amazing (yet somewhat questionable) stories whenever he comes to visit. 

 

 

Woo! Look at it go!

Edited by Hansel

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Hey guys!I am thinking about learning in an autodidact way, what do you say about it? Is a music teacher a necessity or not?

Well because i can't be a creative and can't play instruments like you lucky ones can, i don't play any... Its all because i can't and when i try i fail every time.

It'll a blind leading the blind, but I suppose that you just haven't found the appropriate instrument for you.wink.png

 

 

I know how to play the piano and the accordion...but I would recommend the Piano first...and then if you love playing music, you could get yourself an accordion and start playing that.

I am not as experienced in the accordion as I am in the piano...and I am also not that fantastic at the piano...I also don't take lessons, I play by ear so...eeyup.

Yeah, accordions are nasty stuff with all those buttons, and even though you haven't mastered it, it must be fun playing that magnificent instrument!biggrin.png

 

 

The clarinet is fairly easy to learn once you figure out how to make your first sound. The finger locations are all very intuitive (well... until you get to the really high register img-1334411-1-tongue.png). I still play it off and on, but I haven't really been as dedicated to it as I was back in the high school band. I think I might go play it now, actually...

 

I got discouraged from the piano when I was younger because I was forced to play it, playing the clarinet was my own choice. If you have the chance to learn the piano, I'd give it a shot.

I wish I could play all those instruments you all have mentioned, and although I am entirely analphabetic, I'll work hard to learn them!

 

 

 Trust me, "blowing an instrument" is not exhausting. You're basically just breathing into it so unless you are doing marching band you don't have to get worried about tiring yourself out. 

 

I honestly find the piano to be one of the more difficult instruments if only because it requires you to read two different staffs and cleffs at the same time. Of course, I started out playing the saxophone (which looks way more complicated than it actually is) so that may explain why I see it this way.

But there can be awful things in the tube...sad.png About the piano, after an hour of trying, I don't find it difficult, I mean, it is, but I made progress. A few more days and I'll be a pro!Or not...

 

 

1) Find a teacher you like, and get along with. It's important that you feel comfortable and happy playing.

 

2) Play everything you can get your hands on. Don't limit yourself.

 

3) Force yourself to stick to it. There have been plenty of times when I wanted to quit. I'm really really really glad I didn't. It's OK to drop it for a while and pick it up later, but try to get into a habit playing.

 

4) It gets better. Moving up to the next level is difficult, but it's worth it.

Are you sure that I must get an instructor? They're evil. And even my former music teacher at high school (nah, we learnt nothing) had "sad" as her surname. And she was REALLY sad, always, never laughed or smiled. Irony of life, I suppose.smile.png

 

 

In days gone bye, you were started on the recorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recorder_(instrument)) to learn the basic concepts of music mainly because they are dead cheap and if you decided against continuing you hadn't really put much investment into it.

 

In my experience keyboard is the best next step. Modern electronic keyboards are extremely flexible allowing you reproduce a lot of stuff, and for some reason pianists seem to have an easier time moving to other instruments when they are in the mood.

 

If you're wishing to continue I recommend guitar for the next step. The problem with guitar is that past the basics, there is so many different ways to play it that it can get confusing. Especially as guitars themselves are usually specialized for the playing style. Classical, Spanish, flatpick; 12-string, 8-string, 6-string, so on and so forth.

To tell the truth, my father has a keyboard, he plays it sometimes, wouldn't mind if I used. So, there is no need for an investment. Oh, and he has a guitar too!laugh.png So much to learn, so little time to do so...

 

 

I agree with what Righteous said. Don't stop after playing for a week or so.

 

You may not have the initial talent as some people do, but it may just be potential, and can take some time to be fully uncovered. You'll just be playing one day, and something'll hit you. 

 

I've been trying to sing for years now, and I can say, that I have gotten better from when I first started *though I am probably the most self-critical person you can meet* and there have been times when I've been singing a song and I've had a "eureka" moment, that something became clear to me.

 

Everything takes time, even if you don't think you're good, you can BECOME good.

I won't stop, I promise!sad.png (Is it considered talent if I can play two lines of sheet after a half-an-hour of practice?)

 

 

I have to say I have always admire the versatility and potential the Piano has over almost all other instruments, the bad thing about is that you kind of need a truck to share your music or feel limited of what you can do using the keyboards.

 

For me i always found DA Bass as the most fun and enjoyable experience, yes no pony notice you are there and most of the time you dont bring the hype but being a bass player is like being  a support character you know all this is for you and even when you dont get much of the spotlight it feels great to carry the band on your rhythm.

Oh, don't worry, I'll need some time to reach that limit...wink.png

Do you mean bass guitar? Because those are enormous.

 

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I play the bass clarinet (and can play others in the clarinet family) and can say that the blowing part is no more exhausting than the physical activity of playing piano/violin/etc.  Sure, if you're playing non-stop for 2 1/2 hours, you're definitely going to notice, but the same would go for just about anything.

 

A note concerning pianos: Eb.  Now terrible music pun aside, piano can be easy to learn, but very difficult to master.  I, for one, (for the few times that I've played piano) have a difficult time when I need to separate the actions of the left and right hand (for example, if it's required that I play faster notes in the left hand then the right).  Of course, the same can be said of all instruments, though it's a little more difficult to realize for pianos since you're literally just pushing down a bunch of keys.

 

If you're looking for instrument versatility, I would actually recommend getting into percussion.  While there is a lot to learn about being a percussionist, once you learn it, it is very easily transferrable between different percussion instruments (even the keyboard-type ones, like the marimba or xylophone).  Again, the same could be said for many different instruments, but I feel like it is most noticeable in the percussion section.

Thanks, but once I was at my friend and he showed me his drums, let me try them, but it turned out that I have no talent at playing percussion.sleep.png

 

 

Pianos are so mainstream, why not harpsichord? It's like the piano's crazy grandfather. The kind of grandfather that has a wonky hip and tells amazing (yet somewhat questionable) stories whenever he comes to visit. 

 

 

Woo! Look at it go!

If I had the chance, I would play those huge organs, the ones which can be found in churches..And if something is not mainstream, it is hard to find teachers for them. Yeah, this is the cold reality.

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Violin. You can look like a boss carrying a violin case with something saying 'caution: machinegun inside' (scared the life out of the East Staines Massiv) and you can hurt somepony with the bow.

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I won't stop, I promise!sad.png (Is it considered talent if I can play two lines of sheet after a half-an-hour of practice?)

 

Don't think about it as "how much have I learned in the time I've been practicing". Think of it more as "how much MORE can I learn if I continue to practice". Depending on the piece, it can be tremendous if you can play it well. Also, don't over criticize yourself, depending on your talent *which everyone has* somethings may be more of an accomplishment than others. 

 

I wish you the best of luck, and more importantly...just have fun :), that's one of the crucial points of playing instruments.

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