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Mikahlee

Books Let's Talk: Book Classics

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(edited)

I think there's a book section, but I saw no posts and it didn't let me make a topic so, I'm posting here. It seems to me everyone is posting about music, t.v, etc. so I feel a bit out of place (maybe just me). This is meh first topic/thread, so don't leave me hanging :'(

 

I've read some pretty great classics like Call of the Wild, Edgar Allan Poe stories, Great Expecations, The Odyssey, Animal Farm, etc. I guess in highschool, you're required to read the classics (but I still enjoyed them) and next year I'll be rquired to read Rasin in the Sun (I'm also in Pre-AP English). I hope to become an author and write great books, and I figure these Classics were so great that they passed on down to our generation. So what's better to read (and learn from) than the Classics?

 

So, I'm just making this to talk about the Classics of literature, how they influence your writing, what would you reccommend, etc. You can talk about anything on here, about all types of writing(from poetry to screenwriting, everything), just keep the book discussion on stuff you either really love(so much so they're your favorites), and mainly stuff that are considered Classics. Try not to discuss things too "mainstream" or modern.

 

Just some rules: 

- no manga/anime

- Respect and no flaming 

- try to give feedback, ask questions, make comments, give writing advice, etc. This is gonna be sorta like a "club" thread, so if all goes well, people will reply more and always find something interesting here to talk about

- to join this "club", all you have to do is participate regulary, get to know people, and have a good time smile.png To "leave", all you have to do is stop posting.

- Keep the books discussed PG-14 or lower;  if something is past PG(aka Parental Guidance)*, then state so.
- Keep discussion PG-13 or lower(no signifigant detail il; be courteous to younger viewers 

- no advertising

- if you wanna have your writing critque, do it at the right time. Do not critque one's writing by posting, but do it by PM

- Rules subject to change

*  =  have been changed/modified for better understanding

 

My booklist: Harry Potter series, Nurse Matilda(book that inspired Nanny Mcphee),

A Journey to the Center of the Earth, The Time Machine (H.G Wells), The Merry Adventures

of Robin Hood, 3 Muskateers, etc... 

 

I reccommend:

The Adventures of Pinocchio--- The original 1883 Italian book, long before

all the adaptations. Very good read, and my favorite fairytail, as good if not better

than the 1940 movie. (free ebook) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/500 or  http://manybooks.net/titles/collodic500500.html

Edited by Mikahlee

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(edited)

It's past PG but I'd recommend Nineteen-Eighty-Four because it has highly influenced all of the dystopian works that have come after it. It highly influences my more dark works. Also it's just generally a great book.

Edited by Harmonic Revelations

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I really enjoyed reading The Catcher in the Rye, but I'd say that that crosses into R territory. Holden, the main character gets drunk and smokes even though he's only 17.

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I would say that I'm currently enjoying Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. Great book of all sorts of neat philosophy, absolute classic. And the guy who wrote it was a genius. And an emperor of Rome. 

A book that I also really enjoyed was Catch-22, by Joseph Heller, I believe his name was. But that easily passes PG by far.

There are a couple of other classics I've read as well. Some were better than others.

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I'm A big fan of Dostoyevsky. Havent read all of his stuff yet but its very good. 
Also really like ancient greek literature. Havent even come close to finishing homers odyssey yet. :/
Also a big edgar allan poe fan. I have a giant black leather book thats his complete works with the title in gold leaf my grandmother gave me.  Must've cost a fortune.

 

I would say that I'm currently enjoying Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. Great book of all sorts of neat philosophy, absolute classic. And the guy who wrote it was a genius. And an emperor of Rome. 

A book that I also really enjoyed was Catch-22, by Joseph Heller, I believe his name was. But that easily passes PG by far.

There are a couple of other classics I've read as well. Some were better than others.

And to you sir, that is a great book. I would recommend "The Book of Five Rings" by Miyamoto Musashi if you enjoyed that.
Musashi was agruably the greatest samurai of all time who spent his later years as a buddhist monk writing.

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I'm currently reading through James Joyce's Ulysses. it's a great read, but it is a challenge. as someone that finds there is a great deal of pleasure to be had in analysing writings, i'm loving it. though i wouldn't reccommend it to anyone as a light read XD

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I'm currently reading through James Joyce's Ulysses. it's a great read, but it is a challenge. as someone that finds there is a great deal of pleasure to be had in analysing writings, i'm loving it. though i wouldn't reccommend it to anyone as a light read XD

I've read the Time Machine, it has long descriptions and such and a bit confusing-- not a light read, either, and I haven't gotten around to finishing it yet. I'd probably have to read Ulysses, since it does parrallels the Odyssey(so I've heard). 

 

It's past PG but I'd recommend Nineteen-Eighty-Four because it has highly influenced all of the dystopian works that have come after it. It highly influences my more dark works. Also it's just generally a great book.

I'd have to read it, been hearing a lot of good stuff about 1984 by Ray Bradbury. I've read Fahrenheit 451 and this other short story by him about a man who gets arrested for walking at night instead of being home and watching T.V(I don't remember the name). I can understand why Bradbury disagrees with television, but you have to admit, the film industry introduced a whole new canvas for artists, actors, directors, etc. to work on. The filmmakers would want people to watch and enjoy their stuff, but not at the expense of their health when they watch T.V too much (at least, that's what I'd want if I were one)

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Ooh, classics, huh? I've read quite a few of them since I grew up reading weird fiction rather than the books developed for my age groups. :-p

I'm particularly fond of the work of Algernon Blackwood; he has greatly influenced the writing of the quintessential "ghost story", greatly specializing in them. His famous story, "The Willows" was one of his earliest and is highly praised by his peers, H.P. Lovecraft even citing it as the greatest supernatural tale. Of course I also have read many other authors in that genre.

Currently I am re-reading several "classics", including Cold Sassy Tree by Olive Ann Burns, Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (I have yet to see the film), and Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. Of course I have read many of the famous and popular classics, such as The Great Gatsby, Crime and Punishment, A Farewell to Arms, Emma, etc. 

 

Though one could not necessarily call him a "classic" and he is incredibly unorthodox, I have been heavily influenced by the works of Chuck Palahniuk, and also by the work of Neil Gaiman.

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Also really like ancient greek literature. Havent even come close to finishing homers odyssey yet. :/

Also a big edgar allan poe fan. I have a giant black leather book thats his complete works with the title in gold leaf my grandmother gave me.  Must've cost a fortune.

The Odyssey is great- I also like ancient Greek literature. I'm a fan of his, too; made a linoleum carving of E.A.P with a dragon; my avatar is a close-up of him. That was a really sweet gift your grandmother gave to you :) I've got his completed works all on my nook, but it sure doesn't beat the feel nor look of a real book. I also have H.P Lovecraft's completed works on there, too, have you read him?

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 I'd have to read it, been hearing a lot of good stuff about 1984 by Ray Bradbury

Wait, are you implying that you have heard great things about 1984 from Ray Bradbury, or that Ray Bradbury was the author? Because he didn't write it, Eric Arthur Blair (better known as George Orwell) did.

 

On the topic of Greek literature, I like it as well. Has anyone read Antigone by Sophocles? That's a good read, as are the works of Aeschylus, who was basically the father of the tragedy. 

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass will always be my favorite classic, but I'm also a big fan of Anne of Green Gables and To Kill a Mockingbird.

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Wait, are you implying that you have heard great things about 1984 from Ray Bradbury, or that Ray Bradbury was the author? Because he didn't write it, Eric Arthur Blair (better known as George Orwell) did.

 

On the topic of Greek literature, I like it as well. Has anyone read Antigone by Sophocles? That's a good read, as are the works of Aeschylus, who was basically the father of the tragedy. 

 

D: Whoops, I kinda get them mixed for some reason *shrug*. I don't know, I thought Ray Bradbury wrote something with the title a year, so I guess I automatically assumed it was Ray Bradbury's... Sorry.

 

I haven't read Antigone, but I saw a play about it at school. I might try it, but I remember it being good, a bit like Romeo and Juliet-- I didn't like Romeo nor Juliet, but the poetry was great. Yeah, I'm gonna have to give Antigone a try sometime, and Hamlet, heard they were really good. 

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I've read the Time Machine, it has long descriptions and such and a bit confusing-- not a light read, either, and I haven't gotten around to finishing it yet. I'd probably have to read Ulysses, since it does parrallels the Odyssey(so I've heard). 

 

I'd have to read it, been hearing a lot of good stuff about 1984 by Ray Bradbury. I've read Fahrenheit 451 and this other short story by him about a man who gets arrested for walking at night instead of being home and watching T.V(I don't remember the name). I can understand why Bradbury disagrees with television, but you have to admit, the film industry introduced a whole new canvas for artists, actors, directors, etc. to work on. The filmmakers would want people to watch and enjoy their stuff, but not at the expense of their health when they watch T.V too much (at least, that's what I'd want if I were one)

I'm talking about Ninteen-Eighty-Four which is not by Ray Bradbury, I have not had the opportunity to read whatever it is you're talking about.

 

I'm talking about this.

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I am surprised at how many people enjoy Greek literature. I always thought they dragged on a bit much. Not as good as the Roman literature, in my opinion.

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(edited)

I am surprised at how many people enjoy Greek literature. I always thought they dragged on a bit much. Not as good as the Roman literature, in my opinion.

 

I've never read much of Roman literature, but I still think the Odyssey was amazing, regardless of what type of literature it is. What Roman literature have you read? 

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass will always be my favorite classic, but I'm also a big fan of Anne of Green Gables and To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

I never really got the chance to read Alice in Wonderland nor Throught the Looking Glass, and I enjoy ancient/old children's literature like Winnie the Pooh and Pinocchio (excellent classics, in my opinion). How did it compare to the movie? Was it as good or much better?

Edited by Mikahlee

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I'm surprised nopony here's mentioned "The Count Of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas yet.

 

I can't help but feel sorry for Villefort in the end; no sympathy for Fernand or Danglars, though.

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Huge Orwell fan-Animal Farm and 1984 were great reads, and still applicable as object lessons today.

 

Read a lot of H. Rider Haggard growing up-King Solomon's Mines and She, along with the sequels. Rudyard Kipling,( Jungle Book, Rikki Tikki Tavi) obviously and Roald Dahl (Charlie & the Chocolate Factory, Tales Of The Unexpected). Loved Tolkien also-who doesn't?

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I've never read much of Roman literature, but I still think the Odyssey was amazing, regardless of what type of literature it is. What Roman literature have you read? 

Metamorphoses by Ovidius

The Twelve Caesars by Seutonius 

A History of Rome by Livius

Meditations by Marcus Aurellius

Various poems in both English and Latin by Catullus

I tried to read the Odyssey once. In fact, that book is where my distaste of Greek literature originates from, mainly.

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I recently reread The Great Gatsby, and it was pretty good. Depressing commentary on American society, but it was still good. =P To Kill A Mockingbird is another classic that I love. The Poisonwood Bible is a more modern book, but some could make the case for it being a modern classic. Either way, it's just about the best novel I've ever read. That's a short list of favorites. I'm hoping to discover more awesome classics soon. As a future English major, it seems almost inevitable. :B

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Would Herman Melville's Moby Dick be considered a classic? Besides To Kill A Mockingbird and The Great Gatsby, it's the only curriculum-required reading that I've actually enjoyed. I especially like Melville's long, extremely detailed sentences.

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One of my favourite classic writers is Alexander Dumas. The Count of Monte Cristo was the first book of his that I read and it captured my soul in a vice grip and to this day refuses me even an inch of freedom.

 

However, one book that destroyed my heart was Anna Karenina. Oh my goodness gracious was it so... Russian. And by that I jokingly mean depressing and dark.

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Would Great Expectations by Charles Dickens be considered a classic? Because I love it. I read a couple years back, but unfortunatley I haven't re-read it. Maybe I should.

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@ Sky Song - I know, right? TCOMC is, to this day, my favorite original literature of all time.

 

P.S. - Who do you think ultimately gets the worst of the Count's wrath? Villefort, Fernand, or Danglars?

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I loved The Odyssey. There's just so many wonderful subtleties to the story, and the translation I read just had some really amazing writing ( and he who moves all day through heaven, took from their eyes the dawn of their return). Makes me wish I could read Greek - I wonder what kind of dual meanings are lost when translated into English. I've read it a couple of times now and there's just something new each time. I've also read The Iliad, but didn't get into it as much.

 

 

As far as the Greeks go, I also enjoyed Sophocles' Oedipus Rex and Plato's Symposium. Symposium is a relatively short read and it's fairly entertaining - it reads very much like a play. 

 

Speaking of plays, Tom Stoppard's The Death of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern ​is one of my favorite plays (in addition to Hamlet). The writing is just really bizarre and clever. 

 

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek - not a classic, but the book is inspired fairly heavily by Thoreau's Walden, but mixed with some really interesting Heidegger-esque philosophy and written in more interesting narrative. It also mixes fiction and non-fiction. I don't really know how to adequately describe this book - but it's brilliant, and some of the chapters just really got me thinking in new ways. 

 

If anyone has an interest in Latin-American literature, Borges is fantastic and probably has some of the most bizarre and sublime short stories around. Try Ficciones - it's a collection of short stories with some interconnecting themes."Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius," "The Circular Ruins," and "The Lottery in Babylon" were some of my favorites. 

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(edited)

For me, the best classic was Catch 22 from an enjoyment standpoint, but on the literary/thinking side it' definitely Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. It's basically the antithesis of 1984 (which I hated).

 

To Kill a Mockingbird is another favorite of mine ever since I read it way back in junior high. I haven't read TCOMC (which I know I should), but I have read the Three Musketeers, It was only okay IMO.

 

As for Greek Literature, I read both of Homer's classics (and vastly preferred the Iliad) as well as Oedipus Rex, which disturbed, since I was only a freshmen in high school. The Aeneid is also my favorite Roman poem.

 

I haven't read Great Expectations because I had to read A Tale of Two Cities in eighth grade and I died a little inside. I had a similar experience with Shakespeare and Julius Caesor (though I had to read both Hamlet and Rosencratz and Guildenstern afterwords).

 

Another great poem not mentioned is Beowulf. It's like the Iliad on steroids.

Edited by Foreigner and Lover

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