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If a Human was born in space or a planet Would they be a alien?

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(edited)

Hey y'all, heres a Mind Blower for you!

 

If a pregnant woman gave birth to a Human Baby on a different planet than Earth, would that make the Baby a Alien, since he/she did not come from Earth?

 

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Edited by Nye1254

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Uh, yes. If the baby was born on a different planet that isn't Earth at all, then the baby would be considered an alien but it doesn't look physically like an alien.

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Sorry to rain on your parade but it's not really a mind-blower. 

 

An alien is basically just a foreign person in a land that is not of there own origin. So yes they would be an alien, but not in any drastic way that would destroy the world. It's just like moving country to country. 

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:huh:  Ummmm... Well, they're human, so they're not exactly a different species which is what most people think an alien is. But as for the other definition of alien, meaning a foreign person going to a place that isn't where they were born, then yeah, that kid would be technically 'an alien' everywhere he went. :unsure:

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Depends on your definition of alien.

Alien species = No.

Alien person = Yes.

 

Alien just means foreigner/outsider. For example, Xenophobia is a fear of foreigners. Xeno is Latin for Alien, if my memory serves me.

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Well, the definition of an alien is life that doesn't originate from Earth (according to good ol' Wikipedia) but seeing as humans have always had their roots on Earth, it's a perspective issue. The individual would be alien, of course, but because they'd be a human, their race wouldn't.

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Let's say that he is born on an american base in Mars. I'm pretty sure that, like seafaring vessels, the base or a spaceship would be considered sovereign territory of it's country of origin. But there is also the nationality of the parents to take into account.

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If that were to happen(which will never happen with today's technology), the baby would be an alien. It's the same way if a baby is born in a different country. For example, if an american has a baby while on vacation in Europe, that baby is an alien to America.

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i say no if a human is born on lets say mercury ( fo shitts and giggles)

 

it is still part of a species that originated form earth so no 

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The concepts of differentiating between being an alien person as opposed to an alien species are really not that hard to grasp. The answer is yes in the former, no in the latter.

 

Think Mass Effect. Kids born not on Earth (primarily in space stations) are known as Spacers. They aren't considered aliens.

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In a considering manner, but in a physical manner, no. Of course like @MichaelxXxTrixie said, it's like moving to another country.

 

The word alien is defined with three terms

 

1. A species outside earth with a different, strange appearance

 

2.Someone who does not belong in earth

 

3. (Government) Someone from another country who transferred without permission

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This is not as complicated as you make it sound. In reality, if a colony was placed on another planet or space, it would likely fall under the jurisdiction of the country that founded it.

 

Besides, where you are born does not really determine who you are. Would a human baby born in a submarine be considered a sea mammal? I think not.

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From a legal standpoint...probably not, although some nations handle it differently than others.  They would most likely be a citizen of the nation that their parents were.  Americans born abroad (or in space) are still American citizens.

 

Now, if they were born in a part of space that was considered sovereign territory of some other government, then they might be considered a born citizen of that nation.  But that's a little ways down the road.

Edited by NLR Information Minister

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Yep. The baby wasn't born on Earth, so technically it would be considered an alien. Not an alien as in a different species, but an alien as in a foreign person in a land that's not their own.

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Well yes and no. Technically if they are born in space...they're a Spacer. If they're born on Mars, they're a Martian. and so on so forth. I think if you were to be born on the moon you'd be a Lunarite...since our moons name is actually Luner, or Luna... something like that :P

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They would be an alien person, technically, but not of an alien race. I have thought this through many times before this, and, um, er, yeah.

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I don't think so. It depends on how you define alien. I believe that alien can mean both an entirely different species coming from somewhere other than our world, or in a political/xenophobic sense, someone born from any country or nation other than you(that's all in relativity and perspective though).

 

So yeah, you could consider a human born in space an alien in relativity to everyone else, but they would not be of alien species obviously.

 

So yes and no. I guess it depends on how exactly you define it. :P

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Assuming Realistictm technology (i.e. no magic "gravity plating" in floors of spaceships), a baby born in a colony on Mars, the Moon, or an asteroid base could well be an "alien" in both senses.  The child would have gestated in, and would grow up in, much lower gravity.  If they're in a rotating habitat (to produce some level of artificial "gravity" by centripetal force), they would be growing up with Coriolis effects we do not experience on Earth.  Children growing up with lower gravity or no gravity would end up adapted to it in various ways.  They would have less bone and muscle mass because their bodies don't have to work so hard to stand up, and their hearts would probably be less muscular because it doesn't take as much force to pump blood up to the head.  "Spacers" born on habitats or long-range space vessels would probably have a lot more exposure to microgravity than Mars or Moon colonists.  Even if their habs or ships had rotating habitat sections, a lot of the work of maintaining them, prospecting on asteroids, etc. would take place outside of the rotating sections, in microgravity.  Prolonged exposure to microgravity causes things like loss of bone mass, and blood pooling in the torso and chest area instead of the legs.  A child growing up in space might become noticeably taller than Earth-born humans.  They would likely be noticeably thinner.

 

Assuming that humans can survive for the long term in colonies on Mars, the Moon, asteroid bases or long-range spacecraft and stations, children born in those environments would grow up adapted to them.  If they could visit the Earth at all, it would require extended periods of acclimatization before they could do simple things like walk around under their own power.  They would probably look different.  They would probably be different psychologically as well.  They would grow up in cramped habitats/ships, taught from earliest childhood that "the outside" is deadly, that the walls and life-support systems were what provided protection from the Void, that any breach in the wall is a life-threatening situation, and what they should do if it happened.  Going "outside" would always involve a long and deadly serious ritual of suiting up and checking seals and testing for leaks.  To experience "the outside" without a wall or window or spacesuit between it and one's flesh (as people normally do on Earth) would probably be terrifying to a space-born person.

 

In a nutshell, people born and raised in space would be "aliens" relative to people on Earth, and the environment of Earth would be alien to them.  Over generations, native-born Martians, Celenites, 'Stroiders, and Spacers would outnumber new colonists from Earth, interbreeding with each other and developing new cultures and customs suited to their new environments.  Their populations would be genetically isolated from the mainstream population of Earth.  New ecological niche + genetic isolation is basically how speciation (the formation of new species) happens.

 

Genetic Engineering:

 

Since space settlement on any scale is unlikely to take place for decades, perhaps even a century or more, the colonists may have access to mature sciences of genetic engineering and synthetic biology.  They may well find it desirable to use those technologies to better adapt themselves to their environments, becoming even more alien as a result.  Consider: Tardigrades are animals that can survive in the vacuum of space, endure radiation, and enter a state of deep suspended animation during which they can be dessicated and frozen to 0 degrees Kelvin--basically the temperature where molecular motion stops--then warmed up, re-hydrated, and revived.  If a sufficiently advanced science of genetic engineering (comparable, say, to the science of computer programming in our day) could be used to modify the genomes of humans and provide them something approximating the same abilities, the advantages for the space-born would be enormous.  For example, any long-range spacecraft for Earth humans has to carry heavy radiation shielding.  Every kilogram of rad shielding is a kilogram of cargo the ship can't take to its destination.  Alternatively, it means slower acceleration and deceleration (and thus, longer trips) for a given amount of propellant and payload.  A ship that didn't need to have radiation shielding, or even could use, say, half as much, would be a lot more capable (more cargo, faster trips, or both) than an Earth-based ship of equivalent mass. 

 

Spacers who could enter suspended animation like tardigrades could hibernate for long space voyages.  This would reduce the need for life support (since the crew would not need to eat and breathe and process wastes for years on the way to their destination), and provide subjectively instantaneous travel: go to sleep after launch--wake up in orbit of Saturn, or the Oort Cloud, or wherever.  If they experience some catastrophe, like a meteor hit on their ship, they can go into suspended animation while they await rescue. Now let's go a little further.  Imagine space-born people who have genetically-engineered themselves to have a carapace, or a thicker, tighter "skin" that functions as a living spacesuit so that they can survive outside of their ships and habitats, and perhaps not even need atmosphere inside.  Or, consider the possibility of Uplift--take some fairly intelligent creature from Earth with useful attributes, like octopi or squid, genetically engineer them to have longer lifespans, enhanced intelligence, and the ability to live outside of water.  They're already adapted to floating, have multiple arms, and can squeeze through or into tight spaces.  Perhaps it might be easier to engineer them with tardigrade abilities than humans, which might provide the motivation for their Uplift.

 

So yeah.  If we ever start exploring and colonizing space on a significant scale, we'll be spawning aliens before too long.  And that's if we don't just send robots instead of biological people.  Since machines are continually getting smarter and more capable--and astronauts aren't--the odds are pretty good that machines will lead the way.  They've already replaced humans for all space missions outside of near-Earth orbit, even though the ones we've sent so far aren't much smarter than a bag of hammers.  If we could launch rovers as smart as house cats--or even house flies--and as capable of "living" and reproducing in the environments of space (without needing life support or rad shielding), would we ever bother sending out fragile humans made of meat?  Whether they ever became as intelligent as humans (or more so?), they would certainly be more alien to us than the majority of "aliens" we see in science fiction.

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I've seen similar topic in youtube, where someone elaborates about "What if humans born in outer space"...

 

 

I've seen this same video since I was 17 years old...

Edited by Sunset Shimmer

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I knew someone would post a vsauce link this guy is just awsome :D
and yes I would call someone who was born in space an alien :P

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Well, the definition of an alien is life that doesn't originate from Earth (according to good ol' Wikipedia) but seeing as humans have always had their roots on Earth, it's a perspective issue. The individual would be alien, of course, but because they'd be a human, their race wouldn't.

 

I'm guessing though that they would be the first citizen of where ever they where born, so wouldn't that give them leadership over it and maybe some political power?

 

I wonder if they would be considered the "king" or something of where ever they where born... (and I mean more a place, space doesn't count in my mind for this)

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yes and no, in order to be a true alien you can't have any form of human genetics on the other hand yes because they would be the first non-earth citizen

 

also watch this, it has an excellent explanation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTL_sJycQAA

Edited by jorji

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Hmm, I never thought of that. It'd be pretty cool to not come from Earth.

Also, I'm not sure if you would be called an alien in a foreigner sense. Because doesn't that just mean different countries and the like?

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Technically it'd be dead.

But if it wasn't born on planet earth and still lived, then I'd say yes.

It works, but doesn't in a normal sense.

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12092__safe_rarity_animated_ponyville-co

 

The word "alien" is defined as a foreign person or object.  The term has been in use long before the concept of life elsewhere in the universe occurred to us.  You can even find the word in the Bible, for crying out loud.  That's how old it is.  And I don't think King David was talking about the martians.  God...might have been.  The Lord does work in mysterious ways.

 

To clear up confusion, a life form that originally evolved on another planet would be an "extra terrestrial".

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