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I'm doing a science fair project about how the interior of the Earth transfers energy to the surface. I've got a pretty good report down, but my teacher wants the project to try to solve a problem regarding the topic. I asked her and she told me something, but I completely forgot the term she used that she calls a problem. Someone quote me if you have an idea for me.

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@gamecubeguy214 Can't really help unless we have a clearer idea what the problem is.

First of all, can you describe the concept she talked about, even though you don't recall its name? If not, you should ask her to repeat it, maybe even write it down for you.

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The only thing I can think of here based on the above relates to conduction and soil heat flux density. Maybe that's the term you're missing? Mantle/hydrogenic convection, perhaps?

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Ok this topic has been bugging me and I wanna experiment here in this topic if you don't mind. I'll just give it as a test drive.

Basically I have these 8 problems that relate to a high level Math/Finance course (Theory of Interest), Actuarial Science level Math here, and these problems relate to these respective chapters in my textbook: Measuring Interest, Solving Problems in Interest, Annuities, and Amortization. Let's start with the first question here.

  1. At the same rate of non-zero interest, the present value of a level payment annuity-immediate of 6n payments of $R is 7/2 (or 3.5x) the present value of a 2n payment annuity-immediate with the same payment. What’s the present value of an annuity of 12n payments of $R in terms of the present value of the annuity of n payments?

For all you people struggling in lower level Math courses like Algebra and Geometry, they are nothing compared to Real Math (e.g. Linear Algebra, Abstract Algebra, Real Analysis, Probability and Statistics, and Theory of Interest) where every topic is so abstract and theoretical to the point of making your head spin. It would make you question if you really are a Math expert as you say you are. No wonder some Mathematicians suck at doing the kind of Math the common average person is familiar.

The Math I've been learning all my life is a lie (just like cake). I used to believe I was good at Math, but now... I'm not so sure anymore. :(

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@ZethaPondererWhy's the topic "bugging" you, and what "test" do you mean?
Am I right to assume you posted that question here just to see whether one of us will be smart?

This is a thread for those who're having difficulties doing homework, in need of some guidance.
Because it's easy to think you understand stuff you're told in class, if your teacher explains the reasoning clearly. But when it comes to trying to solve a problem, it can be tough to figure out which way the logic goes. Especially when you know many methods to seek an answer but aren't sure which one will be more accurate.

So, are you legitimately in need of guidance in answering that question you posted? The rest of your post sounds more like you're flexing about "Real Math" rather than asking for homework help.

And wth is this "Real Math" thing anyway, I've never heard it called that until now?
I could tell you about "Real Biology" because I've studied Population Genetics, learned about Illumina sequencing, done PCRs and phylogeny. I'm betting 3/4 of the memberbase here haven't heard of any of these notions until they saw my post. Does that mean they haven't been learning biology, that it was all fake?

I am genuinely confused by the wording of that post there... I understand it's much harder than middle-school maths, but why's this a "test drive"?

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@Feather Spiral Well it's both ways. Being skeptical while still being opportunistic enough to see if this topic is legit in the same manner as say Chegg or Wyzant, just to see if anyone can figure out a solution for it. Under what criteria does this topic specialize in tutoring people. From Pre-School Subjects to High-School Subjects? From Kindergarten to College level? Cause it's not clear.

Also, that was more of a vent rather than a flex since I feel dumb for not figuring out how to solve these 8 problems in my course to do well in. The reason why I emphasize the Math I'm learning is for "Real" is because this is hardly taught (since this is abstract and theoretical in nature) and I wish I would've learned this sooner. I feel cheated in my life for not knowing this.

I miss number crunching and having fun with Algebra. :( 

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Well it's tough to answer the question of which levels, because it's whatever level the person who responds is.

Now, if I'd taken your course and known terms like "annuity-immediate", I probably could've shown you a way to reword the problem. Once you could understand it easier, you could try to figure out a way to solve it.

I also had a similar problem of going down the drain after things got more specialized, so you're not alone there, friend.

(I'd try giving it a try now, but I'm exhausted and sleepless from a trip, so I'll leave it there for now. You need anything else, ask here and cross your fingers...)

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I'm doing a physics problem relating to electromagnetism, however I feel as though I don't have enough data to fully answer it. I'd love for someone to message me or quote me to help. Thanks so much.

The question goes:

A particle with a charge of +1.6*10^-19 and mass 3.9*10^-25 is accelerated from rest through a potential difference of 1.5*10^5V. It then enters a magnetic field of 0.15 T that is perpendicular to its motion. Find the radius of the path in the magnetic field.

Essentially, the bones of the question:

q=1.6*10^-19

m=3.9*10^-35

u=0

V=1.5*10^5

B=0.15

(theta)=90

r=?

 

 

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@Cximia Take a look at this website. There are formulas that you can find useful, with pictures. It pretty much combines the Lorentz's force formula with the formula for centripetal force (which is magnetic force in this case). Be careful not to confuse lowercase "v" (velocity) with uppercase "V" (electric potential, or voltage). The latter is used in calculations of the particle's velocity when it is accelerated through electric potential difference.

@ZethaPonderer I don't think your problem is with mathematics or applying it. It might be more about understanding the problem you're trying to solve. I'm not an expert on finances, so I don't understand the finances-specific terms used in your question, but I understand words such as "rate", "percentage", "value" etc., and it sounds like a problem of compound interest, so maybe take a look on that.

If it is indeed about compound interest, then the formula is pretty simple: Kn = K*(1+r/n)^n  where r is the percentage rate at each moment you calculate the compounding, n is the number of compounding moments, and K is the initial amount of money you start with. So Kn is how much money you get after n moments of compounding. It pretty much multiplies the initial amount K by the entire parenthesis n times. The value in the parenthesis is pretty much 100% of the previous value (that's the "1") plus another r percent of the previous value – actually an nth part of it, because you're distributing the entire rate r over n steps.

But if it isn't about compound interest, the formulas may get somewhat more complicated, especially when calculus is involved (rates of change than can change over time depending on some conditions along the way). Maybe if you explained the specific terms used in your question and give us some context of what they mean and how are they used, it would be easier to come up with some math. Because once you understand the problem, the math part is usually the easiest. (Well, unless you're doing some quantum physics – then the math can get really ugly, with complex partial differential equations & stuff :q ).

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On 11/12/2017 at 10:49 PM, Midnight Blaze 98 said:

Does anypony have any tips on how to learn 2 tables of Greek noun endings in three days?

I can only say that learning them by memorizing tables is the worst possible way of doing it :q  Even if you somehow manage to do it, you'll forget them in a week or two anyway.

The way I learn conjugation / declension is this:

I learn each case in separation, one after another, depending on the order in which I want to grok the language.
Usually I start with genitive case, because it already allows me to form some simple phrases such as "Twilight's book" or "your mother" or "The Elements of Harmony" (genitive is often used for origin, material, source etc., think of an "away from" motion.)
Then I learn the accusative, because it is the most important one if you want to make sentences with direct objects (direct objects are in accusative). This allows me to form simple sentences, such as "The diamond dog chases Rarity."
The next one to learn is dative, which is used in sentences for the indirect object with bi-transitive verbs. This allows to form sentences such as "They gave the Elements to the Tree", but it often works for constructs like "this gem is for Spike" (think of "towards" motion, giving something to someone, pointing at directions, describing purposes etc.).
If there is locative case, it is usually used with prepositions, for describing time and place, so stuff like "Cloudsdale is above Ponyville" etc.
Vocative? Not many languages still have them. They usually use the nominative form for both. But if they distinguish vocatives, I learn them as last, because it is least useful, unless you need to give people commands or address them directly very often.

I learn each case separately, using it in simple phrases and sentences, in which only one element changes (I substitute different nouns into the same sentence to get the pattern), but the ending stays the same.

Try remembering only what CHANGES from one case to another, basing on what you already know about the cases you learned previously.

You can also try finding some patterns in those endings, based on their PHONETICS, not spelling (languages are first spoken, then written down).
For example, I see that the masculine forms are built around the "o" vowel (the "omega", or should I say "o mega" = "the big o", is also an "o" sound, just a bit longer and deeper), while the feminine forms are built around the "a" vowel (sometimes changed to "eta" due to sound changes caused by accents). This pattern is quite predominant in Latin & Greek and their derivatives (shared with Indo-European languages in general). The accusative ends in "n" ("nu") in all declensions, but you've already spotted that, from what I can see. The genitive case uses "sigma" endings (the "s" sound) in first declension (feminine) and "upsilon" in second declension (non-feminine). The dative makes the sounds longer (which changes notation and accents).

A good idea might be to colour the letters with different colours (the same letter with the same colour) to make those patterns more evident at a glance. Try to use similar colours for letters that sound similar. (Remember, phonetics first.)

But still, practice makes perfect. It is better to use those endings in speech or writing sentences than just memorize tables. After all, you learn languages to use them, to be able to express your ideas in them, or read other people's ideas from books. Therefore using the language to express your own ideas by talking in it, is crucial.

Good luck!

Edited by SasQ

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I quite enjoy doing my homework except for essays. I realize that writing essays helps you understand the concepts on the subject you're learning but its so boring for me. Sometimes I even use top rated essay writing service to get help with my essays or just to receive a sound critique.

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