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Do people go to college for the wrong reasons?


LED Dasher
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We all know that college education has value. However, I have come to a realization that there is something wrong with the approach that people take to getting a degree. 

 

Around the age of 17-19, most people graduate high school. Afterwards, many of them are "encouraged" to go and get a degree. Many of them take on plenty of debt and don't have a real idea of what they want to do in life. They study subjects that they believe are interesting or that they believe will help them make a lot of money. After graduating, many of these people have a difficult time getting a job. Even if they do, there's a chance they may not like the job. They may think that they should have done something different or something more practical if they had a chance to go back.

 

Do people go to college for the wrong reasons? I believe that many students are "encouraged" by their parents to go to college and earn a degree. These same students may not have much life experience and may not understand what their interests are and what they can do with those interests. I believe that people who have had life experience and work experience possess a much better idea of the real world and tend to make more informed choices. 

 

 

 

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I think the people that are told by their parents to go to college, but don't make the right choices might be going to college for the wrong reasons if they keep making the same mistakes. I believe that a lot of people have the right to go to college, but they have to learn how to take care of themselves and handle their business first.

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I do also think people go to college for the wrong reasons. Society now basically has made it to where college is almost required to get anywhere in life and they make it to where everyone can go to college, cutting off our base work force that a functioning society needs to operate. 

 

In short, people go to college for the wrong reason because society has put it out that it is absolutely needed. 

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One of the most frustrating things I found about eduaction beyond high school is that in many classes, the same topics are discussed over and over. Take Darwinism for example, survival of the fittest, finches with different shaped beaks, etc. Even if you don't agree with it, in the United States, you have to learn it. In college, I believe I "learned" this about 8 time. Now, in that amount of time, I could have learned loads of other things, but because it pertained to that specific class, it had to be gone over again.

 

Relearning the same concepts over and over again is one of the biggest failings of our current school system, and if you never feel you are learning anything new, why go?

 

Don't get me wrong, I think that educating yourself is always a great idea, buy why does it have to be in such a narrow scope? Why is it only classified as finishing your education if your butt is in a chair? I think more emphasis should be on intern and apprenticeships, allowing you to learn the field you want to go into, or find the one that is most fitting with what you want to do.

 

What does one do after high school? Well, more school obviously. After 13 years in school already, you're tired of sitting in desks having people talk at you.

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My philosophy is: if you can't afford it, don't go until you can.

Granted you didn't get straight A's and a full ride scholarship. If it's free, go for it.

If that's not the case, take all the spare time you have now that you're out of high school to both think about what you really want to do, as well as formulate a budget. Spending your whole paycheck on an xbox or an iphone or a 3DS isn't the best idea.

Currently, I'm researching how credit SHOULD be used, as well as considering getting involved in stocks.

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I think more emphasis should be on intern and apprenticeships, allowing you to learn the field you want to go into, or find the one that is most fitting with what you want to do.

 

You have no idea how much I agree with this statement.  A classroom can only teach you so much.  I wholeheartedly believe that if you really want to learn, you need to be out in the field.  The problem with that though is that there are too many companies who don't take interns seriously, so it's often a complete waste of time.  I don't really blame them; having an intern do 'real' work can be a huge risk, and the benefit of the intern doesn't necessarily benefit the company.  It just sucks to be the unpaid intern who does full-time busy work.

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Indeed, it does, but again, that's a failing within the system. Often, you can turn that around though,as the interns don't take it seriously for several reasons, one being daddy got it for me and said I had to. The other being well, it isn't paid, so why should I do it.

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(edited)

I do also think people go to college for the wrong reasons. Society now basically has made it to where college is almost required to get anywhere in life and they make it to where everyone can go to college, cutting off our base work force that a functioning society needs to operate. 

 

In short, people go to college for the wrong reason because society has put it out that it is absolutely needed. 

 

Many jobs don't even require a degree. If you want to work at a helpdesk, become a teller at a bank, or work as a truck driver, you don't need a four year degree. Perhaps you may not like those jobs after a while, but after you get work experience you can get a degree and then have a higher chance of getting a more enjoyable job. College graduates without work experience will likely have to get an entry level position anyway.

 

One of the most frustrating things I found about eduaction beyond high school is that in many classes, the same topics are discussed over and over. Take Darwinism for example, survival of the fittest, finches with different shaped beaks, etc. Even if you don't agree with it, in the United States, you have to learn it. In college, I believe I "learned" this about 8 time. Now, in that amount of time, I could have learned loads of other things, but because it pertained to that specific class, it had to be gone over again.

 

Relearning the same concepts over and over again is one of the biggest failings of our current school system, and if you never feel you are learning anything new, why go?

 

Don't get me wrong, I think that educating yourself is always a great idea, buy why does it have to be in such a narrow scope? Why is it only classified as finishing your education if your butt is in a chair? I think more emphasis should be on intern and apprenticeships, allowing you to learn the field you want to go into, or find the one that is most fitting with what you want to do.

 

What does one do after high school? Well, more school obviously. After 13 years in school already, you're tired of sitting in desks having people talk at you.

 

I agree. People have to apply what they have learned, otherwise they will not retain that knowledge even if they keep learning over and over again.

Edited by LED Dasher
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Not really true, unless you are able to get into Havard, Stanford, UCLA or MIT.

Those people get into those universities/colleges, will get a straight job after graduation in which requiring you to get straight A and high SAT/ACT scores.

My goal is to get into one of those colleges,i will get the straight job after graduation if i make into one of them.

 

Many people who are unemployed after colleges, because of the reputation of the colleges they attended as well as their grades in college too. But the most important factor that equally contributed to get a great job is the experience of the job you dreaming to get into. To demonstrate the directors that you have the talent in that job! 

 

Ivry Colleges + Working experience + Talent + Devotion with passion = Bill Gates = Rich and wealthy!!!!

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I'm in my second year at university right now, it has to be one of the best decisions I've ever made, granted I'll be in debt to the tune of £20,000 by the end of next year but it's entirely worth it in my opinion.

 

My presents never told me to go to university, in fact they never made any of my choices in education beyond which school I attended, at GCSE when we pick our own classes, I picked them and then came home and told them what I picked, they had no say, when I went off to college (UK here, college is 2 years of non-compulsory education In a specific subject, generally you are there for the ages 16-18) I told them where I was going and what I was studying, when it came to university it was the same.

 

A university degree will not get you a job, a university degree gets you through the door and into the job interview, only you can get yourself a job.

 

 

The reason I like university so much is the connections I've made with like minded people, people whom I shall be working on projects with that may turn into businesses in the future.

 

 

Ivry Colleges + Working experience + Talent + Devotion with passion = Bill Gates = Rich and wealthy!!!!

Sorry, need to correct that.

 

Dropping out of college + meeting the right people + stealing ideas + reworking other peoples products = Bill Gates

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Not really true, unless you are able to get into Havard, Stanford, UCLA or MIT.

Those people get into those universities/colleges, will get a straight job after graduation in which requiring you to get straight A and high SAT/ACT scores.

My goal is to get into one of those colleges,i will get the straight job after graduation if i make into one of them.

 

Many people who are unemployed after colleges, because of the reputation of the colleges they attended as well as their grades in college too. But the most important factor that equally contributed to get a great job is the experience of the job you dreaming to get into. To demonstrate the directors that you have the talent in that job! 

 

Ivry Colleges + Working experience + Talent + Devotion with passion = Bill Gates = Rich and wealthy!!!!

 

Tell that to the unemployed JDs and MBAs from the Ivy League schools.

 

I'm in my second year at university right now, it has to be one of the best decisions I've ever made, granted I'll be in debt to the tune of £20,000 by the end of next year but it's entirely worth it in my opinion.

 

My presents never told me to go to university, in fact they never made any of my choices in education beyond which school I attended, at GCSE when we pick our own classes, I picked them and then came home and told them what I picked, they had no say, when I went off to college (UK here, college is 2 years of non-compulsory education In a specific subject, generally you are there for the ages 16-18) I told them where I was going and what I was studying, when it came to university it was the same.

 

A university degree will not get you a job, a university degree gets you through the door and into the job interview, only you can get yourself a job.

 

 

The reason I like university so much is the connections I've made with like minded people, people whom I shall be working on projects with that may turn into businesses in the future.

 

 

 

Sorry, need to correct that.

 

Dropping out of college + meeting the right people + stealing ideas + reworking other peoples products = Bill Gates

 

It seems you have an idea of what you want to do. That's great. However, many students graduate from the university to find out that their job is unlike what they have studied. If a student has worked in an entry level position (not requiring a degree) or had an internship, the student may have a better idea of what their career entails.

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Luckily for me my parents don't force to go to college because, they know that I want to go there by choice. In a few years I'm going to get a masters. If you don't want to go to college then don't go, it's your education not your parents.

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A degree is the new high school diploma. There is a growing population and not enough jobs. In addition, the quality of education has dropped over the last decade. The first purpose of post-secondary education is to reduce the number of people competing for jobs by increasing the standard. The second purpose is to find individuals interested and capable in a given field. The onus is on the student to choose courses that best suit their goals and interests, but also teach practical skills required in the workforce. I admire people who go to technical institutes to learn a trade. People in modern society tend to look down on jobs that don't involve a keyboard and 8 hours of being glued to a computer screen, but the trades are not only practical career-wise, but also in everyday life. The people I laugh at are the idiots who waste years and a small fortune going through an arts program, then whine that they can't get a job and are up to their ears in debt.

 

Long story short, post-secondary education is just a way for employers to ensure the quality of education of applicants, as well as to reduce the number of people competing for scarce careers.

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Tell that to the unemployed JDs and MBAs from the Ivy League schools.

 

I'd like to see such people.  Those who were at one point so promising and competitive that they made it into an "Ivy League" school, completed an extremely demanding program, and then (apparently) had no ability to get a job.

 

Right.  Still, if you have credible examples of (non-outliers) who fit that description, it would be noteworthy indeed.

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I'm surprised education is so expensive for you guys... While I avoid the "living fee" by continuing to live with my parents and providing pet care and tech support for them, my tuition is only around $3000/year and I'm completely free of debt...

 

But I believe students aren't necessarily prepared to go to college right after they graduate high school and are basically forced by their parents. In grade 12, I was struggling a lot trying to figure out what I wanted to do with my life. I wanted to make sure I chose the right thing, I didn't have much money to my name at the time so I couldn't afford to make too many mistakes.

 

I did end up making a mistake, taking journalism made me realize I didn't want to be a journalist because the industry is downright corrupt. Fortunately by the second year where I had dropped out, I had a strong financial backing because of my summer job. But what about other students stuck in this scenario with significantly higher fees that aren't as lucky?

 

Personally, I think there should be a small buffer between graduation and post-secondary. The student doesn't have to worry about studies, homework, projects or peer pressure, they just have a brief period for themselves after graduation to genuinely think over what they want to do. Time to research, to learn, gain some real world experience, or perhaps take up some real life skills like cooking.

Edited by Celtore
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I almost went to college, the only reason because my parents told me that If I didn't, I had to move out. That's the kind of stuff that shouldn't happen, I don't know how to pay bills, how a bank works, Idk what the stock market is really, I don't know how insurance works, or any of that, and they expect me to move out, go to college and work? I have a job now and am living with my family, but it's ridiculous that they expect us to know what we are doing when we are only eighteen. I plan on not going to college at all, and only working, I'm tired of school and don't want any more, I couldn't care less about graduating, but I almost felt like I had to simply because my parents were going to kick me out.

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my tuition is only around $3000/year and I'm completely free of debt...

 

...

 

taking journalism made me realize I didn't want to be a journalist because the industry is downright corrupt.

 

You bring up some interesting points.  First, it IS possible to get a good college education without spending $40k/year.  Do your research, find something that works as a balance between your wants and your practical limits, and stick with it.  You nailed that part.

 

Second, it sounds like you committed to a field without really knowing what it entailed.  Happens all the time.  If you had read one of the dozens of "worst paying college degrees", you would know that Journalism (on average) isn't very satisfying, isn't highly regarded, and doesn't pay for shit.

Edited by NLR Information Minister
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I'm in my second year at university right now, it has to be one of the best decisions I've ever made, granted I'll be in debt to the tune of £20,000 by the end of next year but it's entirely worth it in my opinion.

 

My presents never told me to go to university, in fact they never made any of my choices in education beyond which school I attended, at GCSE when we pick our own classes, I picked them and then came home and told them what I picked, they had no say, when I went off to college (UK here, college is 2 years of non-compulsory education In a specific subject, generally you are there for the ages 16-18) I told them where I was going and what I was studying, when it came to university it was the same.

 

A university degree will not get you a job, a university degree gets you through the door and into the job interview, only you can get yourself a job.

 

 

The reason I like university so much is the connections I've made with like minded people, people whom I shall be working on projects with that may turn into businesses in the future.

 

 

 

Sorry, need to correct that.

 

Dropping out of college + meeting the right people + stealing ideas + reworking other peoples products = Bill Gates

 

Let's me correcting you again!

 

Dropping out of college + meeting the right people + stealing ideas + reworking other peoples products = Steve Jobs.

I'd like to see such people.  Those who were at one point so promising and competitive that they made it into an "Ivy League" school, completed an extremely demanding program, and then (apparently) had no ability to get a job.

 

Right.  Still, if you have credible examples of (non-outliers) who fit that description, it would be noteworthy indeed.

 

Sadly about nearly 1% of those people are umeployed, almost of the graduates from Ivry League are paid with high salary.

They are like genius! They instantly hired to get into big companies.

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I have often thought things along these lines. It seems like a lot of people just go to college because it's expected of them, even if it doesn't end up doing them any good. Honestly, if you don't know what you want to do, you probably shouldn't be going to college, except maybe if you go to junior college or take general education classes online until you decide what you want to do (I'm in junior college myself because I'm still trying to figure things out).

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I can't say that I'm dissatisfied completely with the time I did spend at school beyond high school, but I also had stellar grades, skipped 10th grade, and was given a fatty scholarship to a state school.

 

While Journalism isn't highly regarded, and tends to be corrupt, for some people it is their passion, and really enjoy it, no matter what their pay, and I say good on them. However, it is easy to be disillusioned by it, because it's seen as glamourous on TV. This discussion isn't about journalism though!

 

The main point I really wanted to make is that you can't just sit in a holding pattern either. You can't find a crap job and work it, and hate it, and consistantly complain if you do make the choice not to go to school. It's unfortunate that college has become the norm, but the fact of the matter is that these days there are two choices for high paying jobs: Get really lucky, or get educated. A lot of times both.

 

Which doesn't say that a high paying job and a lot of money will make you happy. The number of people that are truly happy is something like 1/3 of the population.

 

Ungh. This topic is making me sad.

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Let's me correcting you again!

 

Dropping out of college + meeting the right people + stealing ideas + reworking other peoples products = Steve Jobs.

 

Final correction.

 

Dropping out of college + meeting the right people + stealing ideas + reworking other peoples products = Bill Gates.

 

Dropping out of college + meeting the right people + stealing ideas + reworking other peoples products + Making them more shiny + over pricing everything = Steve Jobs.

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Well to be quite honest, it's very hard to get a job in most countries WITHOUT a degree...often, it doesn't even matter what it is!

We're forced to do it because of society, not our parents.

 

But it's very tough to find something you like, and I think people need more time to chillax and decide, not rush straight in.

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