Ponibius

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About Ponibius

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  1. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    Thanks for having us! It has been fun. I hope everyone had their questions sufficiently answered.
  2. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    That is ultimately a question you have to answer for yourself. Because it's largely a judgement call. It might help to write a few chapters before publishing so that you have a better idea of where the story is going and prevent this from happening to start with. It also gives you something of a buffer to run on should you have a period where you're not writing much.
  3. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    For me, the worst episode is Spike At Your Service, an absolutely wretched and cliche episode that made everyone look like an idiot, and whose only redeeming quality was Pinkie with a mustache.
  4. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    I would say Season 2. Overall I think it had more episodes I liked, introduced Discord and Chrysalis, and had a lot of high notes. A strong season all around. One I'm going to write in the future. I do have plans for what I hope will be great stories, and I'm really looking forward to writing.
  5. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    I would say David Weber, Jim Butcher, and R.A. Salvatore. Weber for the worldbuilding, intrigue, and storylines. Jim Butcher for characters, interweaving story, and getting down first person and great action scenes. R.A. Salvatore very much influenced my way to do action scenes also and got me into the whole high fantasy genre. Throw two characters into a room together and have them interact. That's a pretty quick and dirty way to just get practice with dialogue and interacting. Look to my previous post to see where I get inspiration. Namely, from everywhere I can.
  6. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    Oh we've batted a few ideas around. The issue is that none of us are overly wild about Equestria Girls (or at least I'm not). The problem is that the high school genre is a plot wasteland of overused cliches and zero inventiveness. Once you've seen one high school movie, you've seen 95% of them. For the first movie, you had the interesting bit, the magic, the mystery, the ponies, and they cut all that stuff away to have a very generic, by the numbers high school film about beating the local school bully to win prom. So we aren't rushing to get into the EQG universe. There are things we can certainly do with it, but it would take going off in directions EQG wasn't originally intended to go.
  7. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    Oh certainly. It can be especially glaring when one aspect of a writer can be very good, but others are not good. For example. I think David Weber is great at making stories, but his characters tend to be relatively flat and same-y. While R.A. Salvatore can make some really interesting characters, but some of his plots can really fall flat, especially some of his later works where he clearly didn't want to write a specific character anymore, but was told to by his editor.
  8. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    That comes down whether that person is a good writer or not, and a person in general. I do think you should write what you want to write and stick to your guns. But also be aware that once you put something into the public sphere it will get criticism, and that people are allowed to have their opinions. For myself, I do listen to what my readers say about my story. Now how I take what they say depends on what they say, and I judge it by a case by case basis. Ultimately, it's what you're happy with when you're writing fanfiction, just be ready to reap the whirlwind of what you write.
  9. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    Shorter stories are easier to read and carry a smaller investment. Especially when you see a story that is over 100k and still unfinished. So naturally people are going to gravitate towards those. I know I'm more reluctant to dive into something like Game of Thrones, a very large series that is yet unfinished, versus something like Heart of Darkness, a relatively short book. I think it just comes down to the investment on the part of readers and reviewers.
  10. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    Write the story you want to write. At the end of the day, it's your story, and you own it. If you're not happy with how the story is then you have a problem. It's okay to take suggestions from readers if you really like them and can work them into your story smoothly, but don't feel compelled to do so by any means. If you wrote the story you wanted, then you can hold your head up high for that. At least for myself, I would feel a lot worse caving to reader demands and it messing up my story as a result. You know the story your writing, where it is going, and how it will end. Stay the course as you desire. I would say whatever works, works. Though be very careful when you break with conventions. You better know what you are doing or you will fall on your face in a very messy way. The English language is a messy, disfigured hybrid of an abomination, so you can get away with quite a bit.... technically. So stick with conventions unless you really know what you want.
  11. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    When the narrative demands it. Find the best places in your story to break and switch to different characters. On cliffhangers or when a miniplot point have been reached are good places to switch perspectives. Look at some of the stories you have liked that had multiple perspectives and see how they handled it. See what type of events happen that percipitated shifts in perspective.
  12. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    I tell myself to sit down and write. I'll turn off the TV, close Youtube, turn off my music, and so on until I'm in a dark room with nothing but the GoogleDoc in front of me so that I can concentrate and write if that's what it takes. For me, writing is all about momentum. The first word is always tougher than the next five hundred. I try and write at least a little bit each day, with my daily goal being 500 words a day, but I prefer to see 1,000 words a day. Noramlly I try and set aside a period of time to write, though it can depend how the mood strikes me. Some days I just don't feel like writing, and so don't. I also spend my breaks at work writing, considering there are few distractions then, and I can normally get out 300 words during my lunch break, which slowly adds up.
  13. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    Living with them, eating with them, working with them, and holding full conversations with them. It's a very crammed place in my head. I can think of numerous instances where I've put down logical arguments by straight up villains, and make it sound reasonable from a certain perspective.
  14. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    But I do like a little bit of everything! But seriously, I like classical, metal, some rock, and some pop. At least that is what I listen to most of the time.
  15. Ponibius

    Fandom Q+A Three Winning Writers Q&A

    Some writers whose work I enjoy are shameless self promoter Trinary, AestheticB, Capn_Chryssalid, Ponydore Prancypants, Cold in Gardez, Paleo Prints, The Descendant, Eakin and Visiden Visidane.