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About this blog

Just what may become a collection of thoughts of mine on writing, including ways that I think can improve a story. Maybe they work or not, maybe you agree or not, but they work for me  so maybe they can help another too.

Entries in this blog

Walmart Words

(Or, words I will never ever use in a story) Spoopy Lit (as in “it was lit”) Fire (as in “this is fire”) Emojis (and the word emoji itself) Bae Boomer (“Ok boomer”) Low-key Yeet  Dead-ass   (to be continued too groggy to remember more banned words)

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Screenwriting

We've talked a lot about the standard mechanics of story writing. I think it's time for us to start to explore the world of script writing. I know what you're thinking. "Mr. Tuna! I know how to script write. It's so easy! You just write the character name, then the dialogue!" I'm afraid not. If you write a script like that and try to send it to someone, they'll take one look at it and they will toss it in the garbage. However, since it's a lot easier to picture something by showin

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Critique

Criticism is a good writer’s best friend and a bad writer’s bane of existence. Some people use it as an excuse to just be an ass about your writing. Others legitimately want to help you. So let’s play a game. Is the following excerpt an example of constructive criticism or being an asshat: Woah, okay. Your pacing is way too fast here. What happened? Why does everything feel wonky here? You were doing okay before. Slow it down some. Critique Asshat Let’s try another one:

Editing

So now you’ve finished writing a chapter or a story. You’re tired, fried, you want to rest and let your mind wander. If you’re a hobbyist, you’re tempted to just upload what you made and be done with it. What about editing?  Editing is a mostly lost art nowadays. Most people just assume their work is fine and they would have caught any errors while writing. I speak from experience when I say unedited material may seem okay from memory, but you can have a whole different animal in executio

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Amenable List of Banned Clichés

(Unless you positively nail it) Skaters Misunderstood edgy characters Bleeding heart overly sad characters  Retconning “It was only a dream.” Perfect fighters Everything must end in romance Dark and stormy nights Villainous parents The Chosen One Gods who cannot defeat non-God related villains Plot armor (parenthetical rants) Misunderstood fighters/heroes/musicians who instantly have a huge fan base

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

References, Outside or Otherwise

One of the most refreshing things I’ve found as a writer is the ability to add in references to outside media, current events, etc. A well placed reference is fun to toss in, rewarding when found by the reader, and can give your ego a good pat when it’s recognized by the reader. Most of the time trivia and references are just added for extra “flavor,” though building a plot using a simple reference is not unheard of.  However, as with everything else, it’s possible to overdo or ham up a ref

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Stone Cold Steve Tuna

Horror

Sometimes less is more. A proper description in the right spot can help make a story. Too much description, however, can cost you.  Oddly enough, it can really cost you in a horror story. The trap beginners fall into is the idea that gore = fear. That’s not necessarily true. The right amount of blood, the right amount of description, and the right amount of direct action can make a horror story. The wrong amount can leave you with something like Jeff the Killer. Why does less

Grammar

Grammar is mad important and u need 2 tak it srsly cuz no1 wants 2 reed a story when it looks like dis. We’ve talked about plot lines, we’ve talked about characterization, and we have talked about Writers Block. Now we should talk about the thing everyone loves to make fun of, and that’s grammar. You could have a great idea for a plot, but it means nothing if you can not convey it properly. If the plot is the life of everything you’re doing, the grammar is the frame work.  It should not hur

Writers Block is Serious And You Don’t Have It

Who could ever forget writers block? It’s the unseen phantom that plagues us as writers and drains us of our ability to progress our stories because we can’t think of how to proceed. It’s a real story killer that has ended more than a few really promising works of fiction. It’s just too bad writers block does not exist. What do I mean by that? Well, is there really a faceless phantom out there actively hunting down writers and keeping them from proceeding with a story? No, of course no

Characterization

If the plot is the thing you are writing for, your characters are some of your main driving forces to achieve your goal. It’s impossible to write a story without at least one character, as a first person or omnipotent narrator can be considered a character themselves.  A plot-line often uses the characters in its universe to tell its story. We see the story unfold with them, for them, through them, and at their expense. Whatever must be done must be done to tell your story. There is very li

Plot

The most important part of a narrative story is the plot. It is the central focus of your writing and the reason you write in the first place. You are trying to fit a plot to your story to fulfill it and complete it. If you have a weak or incomplete plot, there is only so much to be done for the writing. Everything in your story exists to serve a purpose; to tell the story of the plot. This means you may come to aspects of your writing with a degree of callous. You can not let your emotions
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