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Episodes that DON'T revolve around anypony


FirePuppy
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Throughout the show, there are a lot of episodes, that according to TV.com, revolve around all of the ponies, when some of them to me, actually don't revolve around any of them, including the Mane Six.

So, what episodes do you think do not focus on any character whatsoever?

My examples are: Swarm of the Century, The Crystalling, Slice of Life, and just recently, Part 2 of the Season 8 finale, School Raze.

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8 minutes ago, FirePuppy said:

Throughout the show, there are a lot of episodes, that according to TV.com, revolve around all of the ponies, when some of them to me, actually don't revolve around any of them, including the Mane Six.

So, what episodes do you think do not focus on any character whatsoever?

My examples are: Swarm of the Century, The Crystalling, Slice of Life, and just recently, Part 2 of the Season 8 finale, School Raze.

The crystalling focuses on Starlight.

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Long list is long. Best Night Ever has no singular focus. Perfect Pear is a great example because there are three separate stories being addressed in one episode and neither has a singular character focus. Of course a good chunk of CMC episodes, though in some of them there is a primary focus (Flight to the Finish). 

Just now, Pip plup 3456 said:

The crystalling focuses on Starlight.

Not exclusively. You have B story in it that revolves around Flurry 

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9 minutes ago, Jeric said:

Long list is long. Best Night Ever has no singular focus. Perfect Pear is a great example because there are three separate stories being addressed in one episode and neither has a singular character focus. Of course a good chunk of CMC episodes, though in some of them there is a primary focus (Flight to the Finish). 

Not exclusively. You have B story in it that revolves around Flurry 

True but only for about 7 min.

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3 minutes ago, TwilySparky said:

True, but the episode doesn't exclusively focus on her though.

I’d say if the character of the episode has more than 60 lines than he or she is the focus of the episode Starlight had 61 lines in the 1st part. Therefore she was the focus. However if your talking about part 2 then I would agree with you about her not being the exclusively focus.

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People still use TV.com? :confused:

Like what's already been said, that's a list that would go on for far too long. The show is only relatively mainly about Twilight, at least in the impression I've been given. I think a broader description of the show's focus is the friendship experiences of all of the characters in Equestria. Episodes that do not revolve around anyone in particular often revolve around everyone in particular.  

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1 hour ago, Pip plup 3456 said:

I’d say if the character of the episode has more than 60 lines than he or she is the focus of the episode Starlight had 61 lines in the 1st part. Therefore she was the focus. However if your talking about part 2 then I would agree with you about her not being the exclusively focus.

That doesn't work with my standards of "who is in the spotlight of the episodes"

Read my blogs on my profile for more info.

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1 hour ago, Pip plup 3456 said:

I’d say if the character of the episode has more than 60 lines than he or she is the focus of the episode Starlight had 61 lines in the 1st part. Therefore she was the focus. However if your talking about part 2 then I would agree with you about her not being the exclusively focus.

1. Then why start your response with ‘true’ if you disagree?

2. Total words and lines are not a good measurement of who is the protagonist or main character. That feels like an arbitrary metric to base that off of, especial considering the copious examples when an actual main character is out spoken by a supporting character. Mute characters have been the main character in many stories before, unless you contend that Mr. Bean is not the main character in his pieces. How about The Piano? Edward Scissorhands? Miracle Worker? Pixar made a film where the main character bare speaks, and is definitely overshadowed by most other characters in terms of actual worlds spoken. 

The defense rests. 

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17 minutes ago, Pip plup 3456 said:

I don’t want to.

I never said you have to.

I said "read it for more detail". Which implies it's optional.

18 minutes ago, Jeric said:

1. Then why start your response with ‘true’ if you disagree?

2. Total words and lines are not a good measurement of who is the protagonist or main character. That feels like an arbitrary metric to base that off of, especial considering the copious examples when an actual main character is out spoken by a supporting character. Mute characters have been the main character in many stories before, unless you contend that Mr. Bean is not the main character in his pieces. How about The Piano? Edward Scissorhands? Miracle Worker? Pixar made a film where the main character bare speaks, and is definitely overshadowed by most other characters in terms of actual worlds spoken. 

The defense rests. 

I agree. For example, Fluttershy, being shy, is likely to have less lines than her co-stars even in an episode focused on her.

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1 hour ago, Will Guide said:

I never said you have to.

I said "read it for more detail". Which implies it's optional.

I agree. For example, Fluttershy, being shy, is likely to have less lines than her co-stars even in an episode focused on her.

So did Pinkie in Yakity Sax, and Big Mac in Break Up Break Down.

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If we go by the generalization that "episodes that don't revolve around anypony" refers to ensemble episodes (or certain episodes which alternatively prioritize other narrative aspirations, such as comedy or specific forms of worldbuilding, over character focus or development), the list would be analogous to:

- Swarm of the Century (Pinkie does play a vital role in the plot's resolution, but her screentime is surprisingly minimal throughout the first two acts whilst the episodes comically plays out the other five's interactions with the parasprite infestation)

- The Show Stoppers (the first episode to collectively focus on the CMC as a unit as opposed to providing insight on any one of them or employing them as a foil to another character (see also Stare Master))

- The Cutie Mark Chronicles (textbook example)

- The Best Night Ever (see above)

- The Return of Harmony Part 1 (Twilight is debatably the focal character in both parts, but this applies less in the former part)

- Hearth's Warming Eve (an episode focused on worldbuilding and the interactions between ponies and the aforementioned, therefore no single character has any major focus within the narrative)

- Ponyville Confidential (similar to The Show Stoppers)

- Games Ponies Play (the focus is exerted onto humourous antics over characterization here)

- Castle Mane-ia (borderline Pinkie episode, see Swarm of the Century)

- Appleoosa's Most Wanted (another narrative focusing on the CMC as a collective)

- Slice of Life (obviously)

- Fame and Misfortune (borderline Twilight episode)

- The Hearth's Warming Club (debatable, considering the third act's focus on Gallus)

- What Lies Beneath (basically a Student Six ensemble episode)

- School Raze (for evident reasons)

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  • 6 months later...
On 11/3/2018 at 2:13 PM, Them's Seeing Ponies said:

If we go by the generalization that "episodes that don't revolve around anypony" refers to ensemble episodes (or certain episodes which alternatively prioritize other narrative aspirations, such as comedy or specific forms of worldbuilding, over character focus or development), the list would be analogous to:

- Swarm of the Century (Pinkie does play a vital role in the plot's resolution, but her screentime is surprisingly minimal throughout the first two acts whilst the episodes comically plays out the other five's interactions with the parasprite infestation)

- The Show Stoppers (the first episode to collectively focus on the CMC as a unit as opposed to providing insight on any one of them or employing them as a foil to another character (see also Stare Master))

- The Cutie Mark Chronicles (textbook example)

- The Best Night Ever (see above)

- The Return of Harmony Part 1 (Twilight is debatably the focal character in both parts, but this applies less in the former part)

- Hearth's Warming Eve (an episode focused on worldbuilding and the interactions between ponies and the aforementioned, therefore no single character has any major focus within the narrative)

- Ponyville Confidential (similar to The Show Stoppers)

- Games Ponies Play (the focus is exerted onto humourous antics over characterization here)

- Castle Mane-ia (borderline Pinkie episode, see Swarm of the Century)

- Appleoosa's Most Wanted (another narrative focusing on the CMC as a collective)

- Slice of Life (obviously)

- Fame and Misfortune (borderline Twilight episode)

- The Hearth's Warming Club (debatable, considering the third act's focus on Gallus)

- What Lies Beneath (basically a Student Six ensemble episode)

- School Raze (for evident reasons)

Fame and misfortune is a Twilight only  episode. 

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3 hours ago, Twilight and Starlight said:

Fame and misfortune is a Twilight only  episode. 

No. It's not. It shows ALL the Mane 6 going through their own group of Fan Dumb.

Twilight: Her "fans" ask for autographs and not actually read the Journal, keeping them in "Mint" condition.

Fluttershy: She deals with Haters who believe she's learning the same lesson over and over, despite the reality that everyone goes through life changes at their own paces.

Pinkie Pie: Her "fans" treat everything she says as a joke, even when she's trying to be sincere and empathic.

Applejack: Her "fans" treat her "friends are family" lessons to mean "we are entitled to be treated like she owe us favors and requests"

Rarity: Has snobbish haters who believed she's never learned a lesson ever or did anything worthwhile.

Rainbow Dash: Her "fans" treat like everything she does like she's flawlessly perfect because she's already awesome not to learn anything. The fans even make Dash's overexcited and over-praising parents seem quiet by comparison.

Twilight's not the only one this episode is focused on. All 6 of them sang a song and even agreed among themselves that they shouldn't let what other ponies say or think of them affect them. Fame and Misfortune was truly a Mane 6 episode and not a Twilight only episode.

 

 

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