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Anyone on here in or has been in Sociology? 'Cause I could really use some help figuring out which part of the ASA Code of Ethics the Stanford Prison Experiment broke. I already got them not allowing participants to leave, and I think not informing them of all the risks, though that last one is still a bit sketchy. Anyways, I need 4 CoE that they broke, if anyone can help!

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On 9/21/2017 at 3:07 PM, Superwholock said:

Anyone on here in or has been in Sociology? 'Cause I could really use some help figuring out which part of the ASA Code of Ethics the Stanford Prison Experiment broke. I already got them not allowing participants to leave, and I think not informing them of all the risks, though that last one is still a bit sketchy. Anyways, I need 4 CoE that they broke, if anyone can help!

Wasn't there an issue with how they concluded the experiment? It's been awhile since I've studied sociology but I know that there is a sort of "cool down" after an experiment that is performed to inform/assess the patient like a debriefing of sorts; both at a benefit for the experiment and for the patient. They did do something like that but it was years after the experiment "concluded" which made the results debatable and also not properly handling the mental/physical trauma that occurred.

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Yeah, it was like 6 or 7 years later. I managed to figure out the others and write my paper over the weekend, but I still appreciate your help :)

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Whoops, should've checked the date but I'm glad you figured it out! Sociology is fun, I have no idea why I picked Computer Science as my degree lol.

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I'm actually planning on going into Psychology, but this stuff is really interesting too

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Just want to put this here for anyone who may see it. 

If anyone needs help with math, please feel free to PM me. I can help with most everything up through multivariable calculus and elementary differential equations. I may be able to help to a minimal extent with linear algebra or other (basic) levels of higher math beyond calc 3, but I would need to consult other references to do so.

Additionally, I would be interested in receiving help from anyone with substantial experience with modern algebra, real and/or complex analysis, number theory and topology ranging from the elementary to intermediate level. (In other words, anything beyond a 1st or maybe 2nd course in one of those subjects would be way too far beyond my ability at this point in time.)

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@SCS I don't know why but I swear seeing you mention topology hit be with a heavy feeling of deja vu. 

And to anyone that sees this, I'll vouch for his skill set. I actually bemoaned not having access to him when I was trying to explain some harder Trig concepts to my youngest kid. 

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Im studying to become a teacher in social studies (sociology, politics, national economics etc. ) and I would love to test my teaching skills, if I help a friendn or 2 on the way the thats just awesome! 

Plees feel free to pm me whenever, I reply as fast as I can.

Dislcaimer:Social studies varies from one country to another, just be aware of that and please dont ask me about grammar, Im really bad at that. 

Edited by Purple sky
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On 15.10.2017 at 2:30 AM, SCS said:

If anyone needs help with math, please feel free to PM me. I can help with most everything up through multivariable calculus

How about change of variables and transforming differential equations to different coordinate systems?

On 15.10.2017 at 2:30 AM, SCS said:

and elementary differential equations

Do second (and higher) order ODEs with non-constant coefficients count? I can handle with first-order non-constant-coefficients equations, but higher-order ODEs with non-constant coefficients that are not Cauchy-Euler (aka equidimensional) equations are still causing a lot of trouble to me. Even as innocently-looking as this:  y" = x²·y
(inb4: Yes, I know that they can be solved by power series methods, but this is very cumbersome and the results are quite useless – it's like obtaining the formula for all the digits of √2 but not knowing that it is actually a √2. So I'm rather looking for some more exact, algebraic methods.)

Oh, and one more thing: TENSORS. If anyone here knows what they are and how they work, I would be glad to hear it.

Edited by SasQ
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On 10/14/2017 at 6:19 PM, Jeric said:

@SCS I don't know why but I swear seeing you mention topology hit be with a heavy feeling of deja vu. 

And to anyone that sees this, I'll vouch for his skill set. I actually bemoaned not having access to him when I was trying to explain some harder Trig concepts to my youngest kid. 

Thank you so much, Jeric, I really appreciate your kind words. :) 

I think I may have mentioned topology in our discussions in the past -- that branch of mathematics has long held a particular intrigue for me. 

That's very kind of you, thank you. :) If I can ever be of help with trigonometry or anything else, please always feel free to send me a message about it and I will gladly do all I can to help.

 

On 10/17/2017 at 9:51 AM, SasQ said:

How about change of variables and transforming differential equations to different coordinate systems?

Do second (and higher) order ODEs with non-constant coefficients count? I can handle with first-order non-constant-coefficients equations, but higher-order ODEs with non-constant coefficients that are not Cauchy-Euler (aka equidimensional) equations are still causing a lot of trouble to me. Even as innocently-looking as this:  y" = x²·y
(inb4: Yes, I know that they can be solved by power series methods, but this is very cumbersome and the results are quite useless – it's like obtaining the formula for all the digits of √2 but not knowing that it is actually a √2. So I'm rather looking for some more exact, algebraic methods.)

Oh, and one more thing: TENSORS. If anyone here knows what they are and how they work, I would be glad to hear it.

Regarding the differential equations topics you mentioned, I have had a decent amount of exposure to them but those are among the most challenging concepts for me personally in the study of elementary differential equations. Admittedly, while I have out of interest looked at 3rd order and higher ordinary differential equations, I have little to no experience attempting to solve them. I do have some experience with change of variables, power series methods and ODEs with non-constant coefficients, but these were topics I learned toward the tail end of the class I took and among some of the most challenging. Please feel free to PM me any time if you would like assistance with any problems or these topics in general, and I will gladly do so -- I may just need to review the subject further and do a couple practice problems just to make sure my understanding is sufficient.

In regard to tensors -- they are definitely an advanced topic. I don't know what level they are introduced in a physics or engineering class setting, but in regard to approaching them from a more purely mathematical angle they are typically omitted from first courses in modern algebra or related subjects, unless you're taking a very advanced first course. I would recommend studying linear algebra first, at minimum. Possibly some abstract algebra as well. I have read about tensors out of interest, but my mathematical maturity isn't at a point yet where I'm able to fully understand what I'm reading. The main thing I've gotten out of it so far is that they build on more fundamental notions of vectors and scalars and allow for deeper study and generalizations.

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Molecular biology major here, so if you have any biology questions (particularly genetics), you can ask me. Although tbh I've only recently been visiting this place again, not sure I'll go back to the level of activity I had before my years-long break.

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Currently working towards my English major, and I am a literature enthusiast, so any questions pertaining to Language Arts, I'll be happy to help!

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Does anypony have any tips on how to learn 2 tables of Greek noun endings in three days?

 

image.jpg

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16 minutes ago, Midnight Blaze 98 said:

Please give useful revision methods! :P

Not my country, but I am familiar with what other have told me works. You about five weeks out? Have you created a timetable and schedule? 

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On 11/13/2017 at 6:13 PM, Midnight Blaze 98 said:

Please give useful revision methods! :P

Practice is what works best, I find.

Instead of trying to retain tables with dozens of suffixes, try learning an example for each. You could even make sentences, if possible with all of them. Or a sentence for each part of the table (say, a sentences with only definite singular articles, etc).

Better still, make a sentence with only those suffixes; when learning German in France, that's how the teacher taught us the Perfekt prefixes. This mnemonic sentence: "Cerbère gémit en enfer" literally means "Cerberus whines in hell" in French, but it also sounds like a chain of these prefixes: zer-, be-, er-, ge-, miss-, ent-, emp-, ver- (I cited all of them from memory, and believe me I have a shit one).

The more you group things together, the fewer objects there are to memorize.

Edited by Feather Spiral
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@Feather Spiral @Obi-Quiet Thanks- I learnt them all in time.

On ‎13‎/‎11‎/‎2017 at 5:31 PM, Obi-Quiet said:

You about five weeks out?

Nope- we just got given a very short time to learn them. :( 

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Hey folks...

You know what I've just found out? I can do my homeworks 3 times faster, if I turn off my phone. I noticed that every time I get any notification and grab my phone, it breaks my focus. Then I start again... new notification... it's a vicious circle. Now I doing homeworks is less time-consuming and much enjoyable and productive. Btw, these tips also help  http://studywatches.com/2017/12/25/homework-for-christmas-holidays-the-tips-to-get-them-fast/

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I know a bunch about science,but I am baffled by this!!!

C4DDB0CD-4A26-4528-9B98-E9CEFFDB5766.jpeg

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I don't expect this to do me any good, but I desperately need help understanding trigonometry. Specifically, applying the sine, cosine and tangent operations to right triangles. I have 3 math classes, 2 after-school tutors, and I've read several articles online, and my brain refuses to comprehend any of it. I have a test next Wednesday and if I don't absolutely ace it, then I don't graduate.

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On 5/11/2018 at 5:55 PM, GeekySonic said:

I don't expect this to do me any good, but I desperately need help understanding trigonometry. Specifically, applying the sine, cosine and tangent operations to right triangles. I have 3 math classes, 2 after-school tutors, and I've read several articles online, and my brain refuses to comprehend any of it. I have a test next Wednesday and if I don't absolutely ace it, then I don't graduate.

Shorten these words to their initials: Sine, Cosine, Tangent, Adjacent side, Opposite side

Write down this "word": SOCATOA

Separate first part into pairs, leave the last three letters together: SO-CA-TOA

Add H for 'Hypotenuse' at the end of pairs: SOH-CAH-TOA

Expand into:

  • SOH -> sin = Opposite/Hypotenuse
  • CAH -> cos = Adjacent/Hypotenuse
  • TOA -> tan = Opposite/Adjacent

If that don't work, then idk... but generally reducing things to single words/phrases/sentences can help, like our German teacher did by turning a list of German adverbs into a coherent French sentence. In any case, I wish you the best on your math exam, because if you're having as much trouble learning as it sounds, you'll need every bit of support and courage you can get.

Edited by Feather Spiral
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On 5/11/2018 at 10:55 AM, GeekySonic said:

I don't expect this to do me any good, but I desperately need help understanding trigonometry. Specifically, applying the sine, cosine and tangent operations to right triangles. I have 3 math classes, 2 after-school tutors, and I've read several articles online, and my brain refuses to comprehend any of it. I have a test next Wednesday and if I don't absolutely ace it, then I don't graduate.

How did it go? I guess it's too late for help.

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14 minutes ago, Feather Spiral said:

Shorten these words to their initials: Sine, Cosine, Tangent, Adjacent side, Opposite side

Write down this "word": SOCATOA

Separate first part into pairs, leave the last three letters together: SO-CA-TOA

Add H for 'Hypotenuse' at the end of pairs: SOH-CAH-TOA

Expand into:

  • SOH -> sin = Opposite/Hypotenuse
  • CAH -> cos = Adjacent/Hypotenuse
  • TOA -> tan = Opposite/Adjacent

If that don't work, then idk... but generally reducing things to single words/phrases/sentences can help, like our German teacher did by turning a list of German adverbs into a coherent French sentence. In any case, I wish you the best on your math exam, because if you're having as much trouble learning as it sounds, you'll need every bit of support and courage you can get.

 

7 minutes ago, BronyNumber42licious said:

How did it go? I guess it's too late for help.

Thank you kindly. I did get some additional help here, and I somehow passed the test. I'm ending the year with a high C, which is, given that I've surfed the year between D's and F's, a miracle.

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10 minutes ago, GeekySonic said:

 

Thank you kindly. I did get some additional help here, and I somehow passed the test. I'm ending the year with a high C, which is, given that I've surfed the year between D's and F's, a miracle.

So you finished HS? Going to college? I recommend learning as much math as possible. Get some books.

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53 minutes ago, BronyNumber42licious said:

So you finished HS? Going to college? I recommend learning as much math as possible. Get some books.

For a number of reasons, I won't be going to college.

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