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Do you Consider MLP a Defining part of the 2010s?


FloppyfluffyEars

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I joined the fandom in 2014 ish so I was active after the "peak" in 2012, however the way I remember seeing things and from everything that I have read about the fandom's early days, I feel that you could say that MLP definitely was a significant part of this decade. When I think back to that time a recall there being a  lot of similar themed media and tv shows started after MLP was created. I do not know if MLP had anything to do with that but there certainly was several huge productions that subverted the status quo. Steven Universe was one such show. It certainly showed that high art quality, deep storytelling could be done in a "children" show. Although SU went far beyond the "children" show title and is definitely up there, no doubt, as  one of the best show sever created. Gravity Falls also had a huge following and was similar to MLP in that it made immense use of a very simple animation style. Another cultural icon of the 2010s was Frozen, which presented well developed female characters who could be strong yet sensitive. I can't help but see Elsa and Anna as mirroring Celestia and Luna. Many people in the fandom made a similar connection.

MLP was certainly a show that presented female characters that were neither defined by clothes and accessories, or defined by violence or over-sexuality. MLP wasn't the only show up to that point that had good female characters, but I see a trend where after MLP several shows, several movies, and several franchises built on what MLP established and created characters who were complex and were not defined solely by their sex or by a single emotion. For example, Pearl from Steven Universe is a highly sensitive character yet she is a topline fighter and a good leader. Twilight is similar to this in that she is highly intelligent and an extremely productive leader yet she also had a weakness with anxiety and can be overly sensitive to criticism. It's not revolutionary, of course, but it is still pretty neat that Hasbro/the Hub/Discovery Family, didn't paint the ponies as being monolithic. They could easily have made Twilight extremely competent and tough which would have made sense given that there is such a push now to promote "strong" female characters. However, they choose to show her defined in many ways by her incompetence and weaknesses when it comes to stressfull situation. And on the flipside they could have presented her as culturally feminine yet they choose to make her overflow in traits that were for many years traditionally masculine; that is her aptitude in science, mathematics, and history. Even Rarity who, arguably is the most traditionally "girly" of the main six was shown to be willing to fight to the bone to protect the individuals that she loves--yet she is an overly dramatic and emotionally charged character. Another good example is Pinkie who is joyful and fun yet she harbors a fear of abandonment which is seen in Party of One. Of all the main six, Pinkie could have easily been a monolithic character yet she exhibits fears and has a grumpy/depressed/dark side to her bubbly personality. 

Finally, MLP and bronies countered many of the stereotypes that people had a men. When it first came out there a backlash people people found it ridiculous that grown men could watch My Little Pony unironically. Since 2010, many developments have been made culturally which have stretched out conception of gender. I will not get into them here since I don't want to misrepresent and offend others, however, I think that we have grown(at least in the United States) as a society and MLP certainly was a one of the wicks which burned during the fire of change. 

I am probably saying much that people already know, and maybe getting too deep; but these are my thoughts on this. I cam curious if you think MLP has been significant during this decade and if  you do in what ways do you think it has?

 

Thank you for allowing me to share. 

 

Happy New Year

 

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I think it was one of the many bigger cultural phenomenons at the 2010s as well. I wouldn't say as much it directly affected other cartoon shows as you said, but it was definitely one of the rare shows that was about butterflies and cupcakes where other shows did everything else but that for decades. And it was time for people to not being afraid to admit that they liked it. Even so, I think MLP fanbase is more minor than they want to admit.

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In terms of cartoons, MLP: FiM was definitely a defining part of the 2010s. In terms of my own life, it was also a defining part of my 2010s. Now, overall? Definitely not. So many other shows and cartoons stood out to more people than MLP ever did.

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I think the show itself was more of a niche thing, though I wonder how much of an impact it had on the target audience. I think it was less significant this decade than it was in the 80s, simply because colourful pony toys aren't a novelty anymore. I would say the "brony" phenomenon was the most obvious bit of mainstream crossover, for better and for worse. 

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It was with me for most of the way (late 2012 up to now) for the 2010s. My 2010s. I’ve spent a significant amount of time in here since I first joined and even met a couple of people from here at one point... yeah this is basically my internet home.

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Honestly, yes, Friendship is Magic is a defining show of the 2010's, for better or for worse. It may be a great show and the fandom may generally be nice, but the amount of toxicity left in its wake was unfortunately quite large, much more particularly on the hater side of the equation. I would be inclined to say for better, but somebody who didn't necessarily like the show as much as I or probably most of us do may end up saying that it was for the worse.

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In my life, yes. In general, probably not. Don't get me wrong, it left a significant impact in many places, but I'm not sure if that was enough to be considered a defining part.

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Without a doubt! :D

  1. Echoing @TheAnimationFanatic above, it revitalized a struggling brand once considered a massive representation of stereotypical femininity and turned into a $650-million brand.
  2. The brony fandom embraced the show, became passionate to a great degree, and helped expand the brand of FIM beyond just the show and a part of many people’s core morality. “Friendship Is Magic” isn’t simply a TV title anymore, but a motto.
  3. The success of FIM completely changed DHX Media’s, now WildBrain’s, fortunes. Once a smaller media company that bought others like DiC, the studio is much bigger in space and staff.
  4. After several empty years, It gave birth to western cartoon’s renaissance. Along with Adventure Time, FIM helped jump start the bolstering creativity of newer successes, and now an array of new high-quality cartoons are part of the lineup.
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9 minutes ago, Latecomer said:

A fine example of the major fallacy in play in this thread.

The show was still a pretty influential cartoon of the decade, so.

There may be a "fallacy at play" in the thread, but it's not as if we are wrong. :maud: A lot of people in this thread are saying it was influential to them, and isn't that what makes something a defining part of the decade? If it had a lasting effect on many, then it makes sense.

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22 minutes ago, applesjck said:

The show was still a pretty influential cartoon of the decade, so.

There may be a "fallacy at play" in the thread, but it's not as if we are wrong. :maud: A lot of people in this thread are saying it was influential to them, and isn't that what makes something a defining part of the decade? If it had a lasting effect on many, then it makes sense.

Their decade, or the decade?

I mean, there were probably people who were way into MLP last decade. Would you say it was a defining part of the 2000s on that basis?

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2 minutes ago, Latecomer said:

Their decade, or the decade?

I mean, there were probably people who were way into MLP last decade. Would you say it was a defining part of the 2000s on that basis?

If a large group of people say it, then it would make it the decade, and not just their own. It would make sense if only about 100 people were saying that, but for MLP it's hundreds of thousands. If that makes sense?

Yeah, actually! G3 was huge in the 2000s, and was very influential to many young minds (and older, I'm sure bronies existed back then as well) of the decade. :twi:

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6 minutes ago, applesjck said:

If a large group of people say it, then it would make it the decade, and not just their own. It would make sense if only about 100 people were saying that, but for MLP it's hundreds of thousands. If that makes sense?

Yeah, actually! G3 was huge in the 2000s, and was very influential to many young minds (and older, I'm sure bronies existed back then as well) of the decade. :twi:

I guess it's also a question of how mainstream something has to be to be "definng". Like, what else defines this decade in your opinion?

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