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(edited)

Hello Everypony!

 

Sooooo.. I was just curious. The world is vast. And the Earth is, too. There are many countries, and many more languages and dialects! So, what does "biscuit" translate into your language and (optional: dialect)?

In Malay, the word "biscuit" translates into "biskut", but in my dialect, the Kelantanese dialect, we call them "Sekut" (you'll have to press it on the S for it to sound right. But not too much that it sounds weird and absurd. e.g. SSekut) Well whad'ya know, you learn new things everyday! Twilight must've been proud of us! ^_^

 

Image result for biskut

 

Well, I didn't know these translated into soo many different words! Diversity makes us different, yet it NEVER sets us apart. And it wouldn't ever! :pinkiecutehat:

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If we cannot now end our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity.     

John F. Kennedy

 

 

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Edited by McFlurryHeart

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32 minutes ago, McFlurryHeart said:

In Malay, the word "biscuit" translates into "biskut",

:o  Do we share the same language?

Not too sure how they say it in the Terengganu dialect though.

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In American English, a biscuit is like a firm bread roll, that crumbles rather than squishes down. However, we also would call a hard condensed dog treat a biscuit, and cereals such as Frosted Mini Wheats are also called biscuits, so I'm not sure what the definition is, but I imagine it requires baking and limited rising agents.

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In Ukrainian biscuit (cookie) is печиво (pèchyvo), and it’s an uncountable noun. We also have a word similar to “biscuit” — бісквіт (biskvit, -vit is stressed), but it means “sponge cake”.

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I’m from the US so....biscuit is just biscuit here. :mellow: And it refers to these....

Homemade-Buttermilk-Biscuits-5.jpg?fit=1

 

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Well I natively speak English only,
but in my country's true language (Scottish Gaelic) it would translate to Briosgaid i believe

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I only speak English, but if I were to use my parents' language it would translate into "biskaṭ ekak".

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here we speak Spanish and it's called "bizcocho"

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3 hours ago, SharpWit said:

In American English, a biscuit is like a firm bread roll, that crumbles rather than squishes down. However, we also would call a hard condensed dog treat a biscuit, and cereals such as Frosted Mini Wheats are also called biscuits, so I'm not sure what the definition is, but I imagine it requires baking and limited rising agents.

In the UK, what the US calls a biscuit is a scone, although also technically what we call a biscuit shouldn't be (because we only cook them once :D)

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1 hour ago, CypherHoof said:

In the UK, what the US calls a biscuit is a scone, although also technically what we call a biscuit shouldn't be (because we only cook them once :D)

You've made me really want a scone now

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Just now, Sherbert MGS said:

You've made me really want a scone now

Sadly, being stuck in Manchester these days, the odds of a decent cheese scone are very low - they only do the dried fruit ones down here.

Americans apparently have them with gravy, which seems odd, but then, Americans....

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Just now, CypherHoof said:

Sadly, being stuck in Manchester these days, the odds of a decent cheese scone are very low - they only do the dried fruit ones down here.

Americans apparently have them with gravy, which seems odd, but then, Americans....

that's a shame, I prefer a sultana scone or a chocolate one or something like that myself

there more wrong way to eat a scone!!!!

 

and also in my local dialect of Glaswegian we'd say it more like "bisgit"

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Just now, Sherbert MGS said:

that's a shame, I prefer a sultana scone or a chocolate one or something like that myself

Well yeah - especially if you can get some of the cornish clotted cream, and a bit of jam.

But the american "biscuit" is explicitly a savory scone, and the southerners don't see to do those.

 

Just now, Sherbert MGS said:

and also in my local dialect of Glaswegian we'd say it more like "bisgit"

aye, a ken that.

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I only speak English, but some of my great grandparents knew German, and apparently it translates to keks.

 

Ok, that's actually pretty funny to be honest. :laugh:

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Biscuit... lol

Maybe it might be called a roll but it can be either way.

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(edited)

I’m surprised no americans here said that it’s a “cookie” yet... :P 

(Well the Ukrainian did, but I suppose I’ll confirm :derp:)

1 hour ago, CypherHoof said:

In the UK, what the US calls a biscuit is a scone, although also technically what we call a biscuit shouldn't be (because we only cook them once :D)

I do love scones! Cherry almond ones... :nom: 

Edited by SparklingSwirls

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1 minute ago, SparklingSwirls said:

I do love scones! Cherry almond ones... :nom: 

Good choice :)

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12 hours ago, Lulaypp said:

:o  Do we share the same language?

Not too sure how they say it in the Terengganu dialect though.

Oof. I believe so :pinkie:. I forgot how they say it in the Terengganu dialect though. But Terengganu and Kelantan are very close on the map, so I'd say their dialects won't stray too far from each other.

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5 hours ago, McFlurryHeart said:

Oof. I believe so :pinkie:. I forgot how they say it in the Terengganu dialect though. But Terengganu and Kelantan are very close on the map, so I'd say their dialects won't stray too far from each other.

Yeah. Generally the dialects are very simmilar with sometimes different stresses. I am told that there was a place in Pahang that shares a bit of Terengganu's dialect because it is closely located.

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3 hours ago, Lulaypp said:

Yeah. Generally the dialects are very simmilar with sometimes different stresses. I am told that there was a place in Pahang that shares a bit of Terengganu's dialect because it is closely located.

Oh, yeah! I wonder where that place is? :o

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On 6/8/2019 at 11:30 AM, Lucky Bolt said:

I’m from the US so....biscuit is just biscuit here. :mellow: And it refers to these....

Homemade-Buttermilk-Biscuits-5.jpg?fit=1

 

I couldn’t have said it better myself!

  • Brohoof 2
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Keksi or pikkuleipä which literally means little bread

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22 hours ago, McFlurryHeart said:

Oh, yeah! I wonder where that place is? :o

:P Can't quite remember where exactly.

I asked my sister, and yup! Terengganu's way of saying biscuit is the same as Kelantan's!

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2 hours ago, Lulaypp said:

I asked my sister, and yup! Terengganu's way of saying biscuit is the same as Kelantan's!

:yay: yay! 

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Here in the land of the free and the home of the whopper, we call them cookies. 

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