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Web Is Youtube/Video Making a Career?


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So over the years we've seen a lot of people rise to fame via youtube and other video services such as Twitch. There's been tons of criticisms of "this isn't a real career!" and many thinking they don't deserve anything. Now granted some people got insanely lucky like GradeAUnderA who obviously works on a budget of zero, but I would argue that most YTers actually have to put a lot more work and investment into their careers than people realize.

Many will say "they're just playing games!" (for the sake of this topic we'll keep it on Gaming youtubers since they are the ones most people are familiar with) but I don't think people know what kind of investment it takes to get started out. Like I do videos and here is my current set up and keep in mind this is not even "ideal" for videos, this is almost like the bare minimums for if you want to start getting serious about videos:

  • $4,000 iMac (Video editing usually takes a lot of RAM and a good processor, the PC equivalent would be probably around $3000 or so)
  • 8TB hard drive on top of my 3TB internal
  • A crap ton of accessories to optimize work
  • Elgato HD60
  • Studio Mic

All of this together costs well over 5 grand and most serious youtubers spend more than that. With the use of equipment, machines break down and require replacing parts too, so you're always investing. That's also assuming you don't get a team to make videos for you like GameGrumps do which will require buying more machines and paying salaries. Overall, it actually takes a lot of investment that you don't even know you're going to get a return on.

Most popular Youtubers record several hours of game footage a day and when they are a one man team like PewDiePie, that means they are editing the same footage almost right after. You get to a point where playing games becomes much more grueling over time and when you're starting out you have to buy all the games yourself.

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Spending time and money on a hobby does not make it a real or stable career. It doesn't matter if you spend 8 hours a day creating videos, or if you upload random vlog stuff in 1 hour. If people watch the videos then that is what matters.

Being an entertainer is risky. You don't know where you will be in 10 or 20 years. Actors or comedians or authors have a real talent. But I'm sorry, playing video games for people is not a talent.

The market saturates quickly because everyone wants a piece of that pie. That bubble could burst and then what? 

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If it makes you enough money that you don't have to do anything else besides that, I would say it's definitely a career. If it's someone just starting out and having very little popularity, I'm not sure if I'd call it one then.

As for that career possibly being short-lived, I don't think that's enough of a reason not to call it a career. It can go the same way in basically all entertainment, and even regular jobs aren't all necessarily that secure these days.

Edited by Tacodidra
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It is, but only once you reach a certain treshold. If your YT channel will be too small. If you will not be able to captivate your audience. If your videos will be on a niche topic etc, you will never be able to sustain yourself. Creating such channel and making it successfull takes hours and hours of work DAILY.

And only once your reach probably tens or hundreds of thousands of subscribers can you start hoping for sponsors/investors noticing you or something.

 

In general, there's definitely a place to make career there, in media entertainment. But as of now, the chances of doing so are extremely slim.

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I don't know what to say. I have 3 subscribers and I didn't even post anything. I have a friend who does YouTube and he gave his own opinions.

- Get a good computer and monitor

- Really good editing software like Sony Vegas Pro

- You need ideas

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I being a full-time YouTuber is a career, and it's one of the new ones too. Just even a decade ago being a full-time YouTuber wasn't even a thing, it was still just a side thing for many people. But as YouTube has grown and gained more viewers and users, it becomes easier for people to create content that will catch a lot of attention and therefore views, thus starting the rise of popular YouTube channels. Being a YouTuber is a risky business as you don't know what your income on a certain video will be, and with the pulling of AD's from many big channels over YouTube's new service terms, it has become harder and harder to create content that will make a decent amount of money, yet still be entertaining. I have a lot of respect for those YouTubers who's only income is YouTube and their videos, they put a lot of hard work into their projects and go in not knowing how much they would make off of the videos. Many of these full-time YouTubers even have schedules now that they work around, pushing out a certain number of videos at a time to meet their minimum income quota. Being a full time YouTuber isn't as easy as many of them make it look, but given the right things, people can create a full-time career out of making YouTube videos :twi: 

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6 hours ago, Key Sharkz said:

So over the years we've seen a lot of people rise to fame via youtube and other video services such as Twitch. There's been tons of criticisms of "this isn't a real career!" and many thinking they don't deserve anything. Now granted some people got insanely lucky like GradeAUnderA who obviously works on a budget of zero, but I would argue that most YTers actually have to put a lot more work and investment into their careers than people realize.

Many will say "they're just playing games!" (for the sake of this topic we'll keep it on Gaming youtubers since they are the ones most people are familiar with) but I don't think people know what kind of investment it takes to get started out. Like I do videos and here is my current set up and keep in mind this is not even "ideal" for videos, this is almost like the bare minimums for if you want to start getting serious about videos:

  • $4,000 iMac (Video editing usually takes a lot of RAM and a good processor, the PC equivalent would be probably around $3000 or so)
  • 8TB hard drive on top of my 3TB internal
  • A crap ton of accessories to optimize work
  • Elgato HD60
  • Studio Mic

All of this together costs well over 5 grand and most serious youtubers spend more than that. With the use of equipment, machines break down and require replacing parts too, so you're always investing. That's also assuming you don't get a team to make videos for you like GameGrumps do which will require buying more machines and paying salaries. Overall, it actually takes a lot of investment that you don't even know you're going to get a return on.

Most popular Youtubers record several hours of game footage a day and when they are a one man team like PewDiePie, that means they are editing the same footage almost right after. You get to a point where playing games becomes much more grueling over time and when you're starting out you have to buy all the games yourself.

I see a bunch of faults with this, especially with "bare minimum requirements".

You don't need to have a "$4000 imac", you can render videos relatively quickly with a decent computer ranging from $500-1000. Video editing does take up a bunch of space so I do somewhat agree with storage options, yet I don't really think you need a "crap ton" of accessories to do video editing. You seem to forget also that most people do go into YouTube thinking they will make it big but in reality, getting a sizeable fanbase is all up to luck. You would need to somehow advertise yourself to others or collaborate with others to get a fanbase and even then it would take a long while for that to happen.

tl;dr YouTube fame is mostly likely not going to happen for most of us do to the amount of people who want to make it big while only a few actually do.

(fyi, I do have 915 subscribers as of right now for music related stuff but I don't even know if you call that "making it big")

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I agree that it is, but I also agree that it's an insanely risky business that I'm never sure if I want to fully pursue. I have a channel with only 26 subscribers, and I put a lot of effort into said channel with playthroughs of hard games that I polished to the best of my abilities. Granted, I've always had to work on a budget of nothing, but right now, I only really view Youtube as a hobby for me.

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Not only can it be a career, it also can be one of the most luxurious careers out there. Horrendous Youtubers like Markiplier, Pewdiepie and Jackseptictank (That's what I call him) make MILLIONS from what they do. MILLIONS. All for making incredibly stupid Youtube videos. Not even videos that are thought provoking or inspiring in any way, just really bad let's play content and acting like toddlers. Youtube is so luxurious for many that is sadly is becoming a platform of greed and a never ending run to get the most views, to be as outlandish and stupid as possible. There are of course great channels that make a living as well, but it is crazy to me that there are people having lives of absolute luxury all for acting like a moron while exploiting video games.

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Yes and no. Making it big--as far as I'm concerned...is a roll of the dice. Career-wise, it's a real career - that needs real time invested. 

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being honest, from what i know.... if you're getting paid to do something, that you put at least two days of work into per week for five or so hours per day, it is a career.  those stipulations (in the country i'm in) makes it a "seasonal job", while working five days for four to six hours per day is part time, and eight plus would be full time.  sure, it's not something that can even hint at job security, but if the hours are being put in, and you are getting paid for it, then it falls into the same category as any other "competitive pay" job, which are all ladders into careers.

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i would say so, but having a successful career on youtube is usually a hit or miss thing. you can put alot of work into your videos and spend lots of time on it like a career, but if you dont get many subscribers or views, you wont really get far with it

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I would say a career on you tube solely relies on your viewers subscribers and quality of content. Their is also a little luck that has to be involved in order for you to hit it big or for the right person to see you tat the right time. I wouldn't rely on it unless you can make a substantial amount of money and then I would keep my day job for the fact it could fall out. I also feel some of the you tube stars are getting money from somewhere else other than ads and you tube.

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9 hours ago, Key Sharkz said:

this is almost like the bare minimums for if you want to start getting serious about videos: 

No. no its not. The bare minimum is an Iphone. Unless you are talking about like...making skits or 3D animations.  Alot of people on twitch AND youtube, including myself start out with just an iphone. You could have an  8 grand set up and still have little to no subscribers like most people did when starting out. If being a streamer and tuber was a real career, why hasnt everyone done it? Simple:

Its all subjective and its all flooded. Furthermore its all superficial. Let me elaborate(dont worry, theres a tl;dr at the bottom):
Superficial:
take a gander at some youtubers and streamers....not the top 10 mind you, because there are different categories. Just research one based on what your interests are or what you like to see. For me, I do ASMR so i like to support fellow asmr artists. I noticed something about those streamers. Low cut clothing, makeup to cover up inperfections....no real talent....but man are those donations coming in. Go to chat and oh...its getting a little pg-13. I soon realized the better looking you are the more views you get. Not saying you gotta be a bombshell, but no one is gonna watch anyone with a bearded neck...unless your Boogie.
Its the same on Youtube. Some 'top endorsed' you tube comedians are usually model tier people with promiscuous clothing and stolen jokes.

It's Subjective:
I think JackSepticEye is hilarious, while others find him annoying. I dislike Ninja, yet there he is the number one twitch personality. Point is, theres gonna be a lot of people who like what you do and how you do it. At the same tiime, there will be a ton of people who dont. Course, there are also people who dont know you as a content creator exist. You can see this Pewdiepie. EVERYONE loved him as a lets player, but now that he does meme reviews, almost half has subs had a fit. However for Pewdiepie he has enough influence to negate any of that.
Which is another thing you have to work on, How influential you are to other people.

If you wanna be realistic, Youtube and Twitch is just a hobby. Thats how it should be looked at...not as a career, cause then it almost always crashes and burns. Many famous youtube personalities such as Markiplier, Jacksepticeye, Shane, and Pre-2015 Smosh have stated such. They started out as a hobby or something to pass the time, and then got a massive cult following either due to their formatting, or how captivating they are. Also it takes a while...so if youre banking on youtube or twitch money to fund your life, youre gonna be homeless and despot before you make enough profit. Most legit youtubers had jobs while youtubing to destress or just because.

so tl;dr
You can twitch or youtube with just your phone
Youtube and Twitch is subjective

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In my opinion, it's just being an entertainer, but on YouTube. If it's not bringing in enough money you'll need another job on the side and it's just a hobby for now. If, by some chance, you do succeed, you'll be able to make it your career. Then if you're smart (and don't make trash content) you'll be able to turn your YouTube fame into something outside YouTube.

Is it a career? Not necessarily. But it can be.

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If it makes them money, whatever, but I still am not going to take it very seriously.

I watched a YouTuber transform from just making videos on the side to help people out in selected games, to a full-time streamer who quit his real job and the final result just hasn't been as fun to watch. I just don't understand why anyone should be making money off of videos streaming them playing a video game. It's just silly to me.

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No more than a freelancing or a hobby. A lot is placed on a pure luck. Sometimes it doesn't even pay off.

So, if you are insterested to take such a career choice for good, here's my advice, as with any hobby: start small. Don't rush into grand spendings at once. That way you won't be as disappointed if you happen to fail.

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If you're good enough. It's not just having the tech to do it, but having the charisma, enthusiasm and skill to make good and entertaining videos. Hell, you can suck at video games but if you're fun to watch and listen too(and not acting like a whiny bitch like DSP), people will come and watch

5 hours ago, Kyoshi said:

Not only can it be a career, it also can be one of the most luxurious careers out there. Horrendous Youtubers like Markiplier, Pewdiepie and Jackseptictank (That's what I call him) make MILLIONS from what they do. MILLIONS. All for making incredibly stupid Youtube videos. Not even videos that are thought provoking or inspiring in any way, just really bad let's play content and acting like toddlers. Youtube is so luxurious for many that is sadly is becoming a platform of greed and a never ending run to get the most views, to be as outlandish and stupid as possible. There are of course great channels that make a living as well, but it is crazy to me that there are people having lives of absolute luxury all for acting like a moron while exploiting video games.

Someone sounds really salty people managed to be successful playing games on Youtube

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Just now, Whomps said:

If you're good enough. It's not just having the tech to do it, but having the charisma, enthusiasm and skill to make good and entertaining videos. Hell, you can suck at video games but if you're fun to watch and listen too(and not acting like a whiny bitch like DSP), people will come and watch

Someone sounds really salty people managed to be successful playing games on Youtube

You bet I am salty. Thanks for pointing out the obvious. Of course I am salty that some people get MILLIONS OF DOLLARS doing something that doesn't fucking deserve it. All while they exploit and make a mockery of video games, something that I actually have passion for. Something these brain dead, soulless Youtubers know nothing of. They don't know what passion is, they only see those sweet dollar signs. 

So yeah, total salt, so if you think you are creative for saying something so bland and uncreative, you're not.

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3 minutes ago, Kyoshi said:

You bet I am salty.

You misspelled envious. 

3 minutes ago, Kyoshi said:

All while they exploit and make a mockery of video games, something that I actually have passion for.

How exactly are they making a mockery of video games? 

5 minutes ago, Kyoshi said:

Something these brain dead, soulless Youtubers know nothing of. They don't know what passion is, they only see those sweet dollar signs. 

Didn't all of the youtubers you mentioned start with their youtube channel as a hobby? I mean, there are like a ton of ways to make easier money than to do what they do, so  doubt that they are solely in it for the money. 

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1 minute ago, Yamet said:

You misspelled envious. 

How exactly are they making a mockery of video games? 

Didn't all of the youtubers you mentioned start with their youtube channel as a hobby? I mean, there are like a ton of ways to make easier money than to do what they do, so  doubt that they are solely in it for the money. 

Envious, salty, both. I won't hide that fact. Honesty, another thing these Youtubers don't know about. Them making a mockery of games is easy. Because they play it for the money. The joy is secondary, the money is first. The joy is probably even better for them because they know they are getting more money than most people despite doing less AND they have an army of fans ready to treat them like a god. And they dd what again? Oh, they play video games and it is so corporate too. Amazing. Now, would I take the opportunity like this if I somehow could? Totally, but I would actually be honest about it. These people didn't start to get the money, but you think they will EVER go to something else? Hell no. Once they started getting that money, they probably realized how much of a money machine it all is and it is way more luxurious than stuff that the common peasants do. Working at a factory or playing video games, making even more money and people licking your toes all the time for doing basically nothing. You won't believe how many comments there are for these people telling them that they are basically a savior of mankind for playing video games and acting like an idiot. If they ever feel down they can make a video for easy sympathy money and millions of people will compliment them, stroke their ego and tell them how great they are. Me? I wake up every day WISHING I could throw my worthless body off of a bridge. So it seems a tad disheartening to see all of this bullshit.

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Well, if someone make enough money of youtube/twitch to live on I would call it a career. 

51 minutes ago, Kyoshi said:

They don't know what passion is, they only see those sweet dollar signs. 

How do you know that? Pewdiepie, Markipiller and Jacksepticeye all genuine seem to like making vidoes. 

 

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