heavens-champion

Why do some cultures glorify death?

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(edited)

I find this mentality very unusual. Why is it the some cultures glorify death to the point where they think death is salvation?

Edited by heavens-champion

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Because the world is sick and death is mysterious

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Do you have specific examples? Just asking because I do believe there is a difference between glorifying death and honoring the dead in a different manner, like Mexicans do during Día de Los Muertos.

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Could you provide a specific example? I ask this because different cultures view death differently. It’s not death, as such, which is a universal experience, but the expression of grief that differs so much between cultures. This article gives examples of how different cultures handle death: https://countrynavigator.com/blog/cultural-intelligence/death/

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Well, regardless of what you mean by glorify, I would think it's because death is really, really scary. Even just watching someone else die - or dead. When my father died, I suddenly understood why people are so desperate to believe in an afterlife.

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First thought that came to my head were the Spartans and the saying, "Come back with this shield or on it." because for such a militant nation, your death should have been a sacrifice in defending your land or enriching it in conquest, and I can respect those efforts.

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3 hours ago, heavens-champion said:

I find this mentality very unusual.

 

2 hours ago, PaulBron said:

Because the world is sick and death is mysterious

It's sounds like you guys aren't familiar with the day of the dead or Chinese new years..:bea:

 

28 minutes ago, Venomous said:

Could you provide a specific example? I ask this because different cultures view death differently. It’s not death, as such, which is a universal experience, but the expression of grief that differs so much between cultures. This article gives examples of how different cultures handle death: https://countrynavigator.com/blog/cultural-intelligence/death/

Exactly 

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(edited)

In America we have an entire night set aside to do this, it's called Halloween,  granted some people don't dress up as ghouls, grim reapers or zombies, I remember when I was about 10 years old

a neighbor dressed up as a tube of toothpaste my mom joked saying, that was one less item on her shopping list that she needed to buy.

Halloween is a day (or night)  that is "rooted" in the dead,  and the after life, does it cause harm spiritual or other wise? the jury is still out on that one.

maybe the word, "glorify" is a bit strong?

Edited by strongwilled_pegasus

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40 minutes ago, strongwilled_pegasus said:

Halloween is a day (or night)  that is "rooted" in the dead,  and the after life, does it cause harm spiritual or other wise? the jury is still out on that one.

maybe the word, "glorify" is a bit strong?

That would be wrong. The American tradition is a combination of Samhain/Calan Gaeaf, European Christian Folk-Lore and Dia de Los Muertos. One is a night to dress up and offer treats to confuse and appease the Fay Folk to avoid their mischief. The middle is a mish-mash of superstitions about witchcraft and lost souls with the older Galiec traditions. The final honors and respects those that have passed in a night of remembrance. None of this glorifies death. All of it seeks to protect the living or honor those that have passed. 

Finally there is not a scrap of evidence that any of it causes any harm. So the jury was not even summoned let alone sat on a trial and is now in deliberation. 

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It is because of religion, mainly. The majority of religious dogma views death as essentially the best thing to happen to a person, as it allows them to transcend to some magical place of perfection and no pain and suffering. You'll hear the religious say the phrase 'They are in a better place' a lot, a phrase I find to be hideous and insulting. It is a classic case of the glorification of death itself.

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Most do glorify sacrifice - at least in the context of giving one's life for some greater good. Admiral Nelson is the case that springs to mind for - he won a huge victory that kept Britain safe from Napoleon but was killed in the process, and now he's got a statue on top of a truly massive column in the middle of London. I'm sure other countries have similar examples.

As to why they are so glorified; it's in society's interests to do so. It's an inspiration to give more in service to that society and put its need above their own, which helps it endure and prosper.

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@heavens-champion

9 hours ago, heavens-champion said:

I find this mentality very unusual.

Your opening post is not very specific.

What exactly do you mean by "glorify death"? Frankly, the vaugeness you're making in kinda make cultures that respect death like Mexico seem like insane places and people, being pro-suidice, which they are not.

Try to be more specific in your argument if you're trying to share a point of view. 

This clip sums it up.

 

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Like Jedishy and Will Guide have explained well, it's not about "glorifying" death like some form of worship. Even today's science doesn't know everything about death, so of course our culture has a history of exploring the mysteries of death and the possibility of what happens after. Even your average joe who's into the occult doesn't actually worship death, they're in it most of the time out of a sense of curiosity and fascination. I don't see anything wrong with wanting to learn more about death. We all feel the incentive to look for answers. 

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Because that is how their culture has developed, they have chosen over time to lean towards certain aspects of the world around them.

We may aswell try to ask "Why is a tree a 'tree'?" ...someone at some point said "We'll call that a tree" and, I guess, the name stuck.

To die for something you believe in, to die a noble death is held dear in may cultures. Whether you've died in battle (Vikings and Valhalla, Nelson, The Unknown Soldier) or been martyred.

It's how some are.

 

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I really wish you'd be more specific with your posts instead of just leaving a question without any actual information...…  Could you please articulate what you mean?  Which cultures are you talking about?  What do you mean by "Glorify death"?  Is it just an assumption you've made over how a culture mourns the passing of a fellow?  I'd rather have a block of text with information than just a vague question that anyone can gather a different meaning from?????????????????

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(edited)
On 2/4/2019 at 5:01 PM, Kyoshi said:

It is because of religion, mainly. The majority of religious dogma views death as essentially the best thing to happen to a person, as it allows them to transcend to some magical place of perfection and no pain and suffering. You'll hear the religious say the phrase 'They are in a better place' a lot, a phrase I find to be hideous and insulting. It is a classic case of the glorification of death itself.

Honestly, It's not death I'm fond of so much as their being life after death.

What's so insulting about an afterlife?

Edited by heavens-champion

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On 2/6/2019 at 3:58 PM, Thuja said:

I really wish you'd be more specific with your posts instead of just leaving a question without any actual information...…  Could you please articulate what you mean?  Which cultures are you talking about?  What do you mean by "Glorify death"?  Is it just an assumption you've made over how a culture mourns the passing of a fellow?  I'd rather have a block of text with information than just a vague question that anyone can gather a different meaning from?????????????????

Basically, I'm curios as to why certain people would think death was a good thing.

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On 2/21/2019 at 12:13 PM, heavens-champion said:

Basically, I'm curios as to why certain people would think death was a good thing.

From someone who's been suicidal, it can be a way to release all mortal pain and cease the agony within. Though, I don't think this is what you mean. I'm going to say you're probably referring to warrior culture where dying in battle is highest glory one can achieve. There is much to be said about that mindset. It comes from a place of pride in knowing that you did your duty and perished doing what you believed was right. There is also reverence for the dead, which is a part of Mexican culture, among many others of course. It's more remembrance than glorification. Few cultures, outside of warrior cultures, have genuinely glorified the idea of dying or death.

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On 2/21/2019 at 11:13 AM, heavens-champion said:

Basically, I'm curios as to why certain people would think death was a good thing.

You need to give examples because you have yet to provide any evidence or example that any of what you have posted is true

Warrior culture glorifies the sacrifice of yourself for a greater good. Not the death itself but what you are doing it for and they honor that loss. 

Some believe in an afterlife that is free of suffering but again that is not feeling the death itself is good but what comes after. 

So what cultures actually think death is a good thing and are not merely 1) remembering the dead or 2) honoring the sacrifice made for other, or 3) celebrating that a person is past mortal hurts now. Because so far NO culture I have seen that I can remember thinks the act of dying is good/noble but rather that what comes before it or after it can be. 

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(edited)
25 minutes ago, Jedishy said:

You need to give examples because you have yet to provide any evidence or example that any of what you have posted is true

 

Cultures that practice martyrdom. Cultures that say "If you die, you're saving yourself."

Edited by heavens-champion

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Just now, heavens-champion said:

Cultures that practice martyrdom. Cultures that say "If you die, you're saving yourself."

Already broke down martyrdom. They do not view the death as good they view the sacrifice for others or your beliefs as good. They do not generally believe that you should try to die but that some things are more important than death. So no they do not glorify or thing that death is good. They think standing strong and sacrificing for what you believe in is what is good. 

And what culture says "If you die, you're saving yourself."

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10 minutes ago, Jedishy said:

Already broke down martyrdom. They do not view the death as good they view the sacrifice for others or your beliefs as good. They do not generally believe that you should try to die but that some things are more important than death. So no they do not glorify or thing that death is good. They think standing strong and sacrificing for what you believe in is what is good. 

And what culture says "If you die, you're saving yourself."

Just some self-righteous extremist group from the Middle East. Well, one member of it said that in one article.

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1 minute ago, heavens-champion said:

Just some self-righteous extremist group from the Middle East. Well, one member of it said that in one article.

Ok no source so no context thus this can be tossed out. But if I had to give it context it sounds like martyrdom to me and again I covered that. It's not the death that is good but what the lead to death or what is gained by it. 

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1 minute ago, Jedishy said:

Ok no source so no context thus this can be tossed out.

Meh, I didn't feel like talking about it, anyway.

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Just now, heavens-champion said:

Meh, I didn't feel like talking about it, anyway.

You created the topic with no real support for the question but did not want to talk about it? :blink: Ya have me confused. 

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